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Thread: C.o.d

  1. #1
    Forum Member
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    Default C.o.d

    I am in the industrial field and we primarily train for rescuing a suspended worker in fall protection. With this runs the risk of suspension trauma so time is of the essence. Question is has anyone used or considered using edge rollers secured to the beam where the worker is suspended from as your C.O.D. Thus saving a fair bit of time instead of setting the anchor, connecting the pulley, carabineer and running rope through. We typically will then connect to the victims D-ring to do a quick raise & lower using a 4:1 inline. The most time consuming part is having the rescuer who is on the beam setting the C.O.D as he has to manage his own fall protection along with the equipment he is working with. To me this could be a very quick and efficient option if done properly. The angle coming in and out of it would have to be considered also as it would have to be pretty straight away as to not side load the roller and pull it off or create more friction. Just a different idea. And again, its not something I would use all the time but if the situation presented would you consider?


  2. #2
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    Default

    [QUOTE=livanh21;1398371]I am in the industrial field and we primarily train for rescuing a suspended worker in fall protection. With this runs the risk of suspension trauma so time is of the essence. Question is has anyone used or considered using edge rollers secured to the beam where the worker is suspended from as your C.O.D. Thus saving a fair bit of time instead of setting the anchor, connecting the pulley, carabineer and running rope through. We typically will then connect to the victims D-ring to do a quick raise & lower using a 4:1 inline. ]

    This where you need to stop rigging and do the rescue. I spend 90+% of my time teaching/working in industrial facilities all over the world. Two scenarios here. Dangling, conscious, uninjured victim or dangling unconscious or injured and can't assist in his rescue victim. You have access to his anchor point and lanyard. Lower a mainline and a belay line to him and have him hook it up to his harness. Raise enough to release his lanyard from the anchor point then either raise him up or lower him to safety. If he is unconscious or injured, use an extension pole to attach a carabiner and rope(s) to his harness. Same rescue procedure as stated above. If you don't have an extension pole triple wrap a Prusik around his lanyard and use same procedure.

    There are many times when you can't get a strap around a beam because it supports the roof decking, can't be reached safely as in your scenario, etc.

    Even though a lot of us have access to a lot of rescue equipment and talented people it all comes back to the basics. Can we make the rescue by another, safer means? #1 - can you set a ladder up underneath him and have him self rescue? #2 - Can you reach him with a man lift? #3 - if no man lift, can you reach him with a forklift with a pallet on the forks? #4 - last resort...send a rescuer over the side by rope to make the hook up and rescue.

    Keep it simple. I have seen way too many rescue attempts that looked like a nest of spiders because of so many ropes running so many different directions when a very simple raise or lower would have sufficed.

    Good luck.

    Mike Dunn
    Emergency Response Training

  3. #3
    Forum Member Fairfield's Avatar
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    Mike, so what is the answer to the rescue when you cant just reach with a pole, and lowering or raising will be impeded by pipes, cable trays, structure, or the victim is on aide climb? Mind you have asked this question to a few instructors that teach "industrial rescue" in the past and to their credit very knowledgeable and from reputable training companies. I don't know if I just expect more skill/ knowledge from them or I am just being unrealistic, but I am finding that "rescue instructors" from a fire background are becoming out of date on what is trending work wise in industry. Although rope access workers will rig for rescue prior to working, and in a lot of cases rig releasable anchors to back them self up with that as well, it still wont solve a good amount of problems that will start being seen. How many industrial rescue classes will teach how to rescue industrial climbers? Or get them familiar with their systems and techniques? Sorry for a bit of a rant, I started a large part of my climbing career in the fire service and see that the product being put out on that side now is becoming a bit of a joke IMO. I would never say I would not want their help when needed but I sure would be watching very carefully as to what they are doing.

    My thought on the original question though, if you place an edge roller you still have to secure that, so would you be saving time or just doing the same thing in a different way?

    I am not trying to bash fire rescue, just want the best from them.

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