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Thread: 10 ways to prevent cancer. Help make a list

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    Default 10 ways to prevent cancer. Help make a list

    I'm making a flyer to post around the station since I have noticed many thing that we can do to help prevent cancer. Some are so simple but many do not even try to do them. Please give me you options on simple things we can do to help our brothers and sisters out.

    My list so far.

    1 wash gear after all fires. Including your helmet!
    2. Shower after fires. Cold water first to rinse yourself off. Not hot first since it will open your pores up.
    3. Keep idling to a minimum in the bays. If you are idling in the bays have both bay doors open all the way. If prolonged idling move out of bays.
    4. Use SCBA during overhaul. Use air monitoring to know when it's safe to remove SCBA

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    STOP USING TOBACCO. ALL OF IT.

    The smoke stinks, and the spit is just friggin' gross.

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    At the earliest opportunity that you know that you will no longer need full PPE, immeidately remove your hood. Contaminants in the hood are pressing against your throat. Sweat, open pores and such will cause you to absorb carcinogens. Wash your hood ASAP, and use a second hood, if available. Your thyroid will thank you.

    Edit:

    Do not bring any of your gear into any living areas inside the station, even for a minute. Look into having plymovents installed in the station to capture diesel exhaust, and clean exhaust technology for new apparatus.
    Last edited by O501; 01-26-2014 at 09:32 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mowgli25 View Post
    I'm making a flyer to post around the station since I have noticed many thing that we can do to help prevent cancer. Some are so simple but many do not even try to do them. Please give me you options on simple things we can do to help our brothers and sisters out.

    My list so far.

    1 wash gear after all fires. Including your helmet!
    2. Shower after fires. Cold water first to rinse yourself off. Not hot first since it will open your pores up.
    3. Keep idling to a minimum in the bays. If you are idling in the bays have both bay doors open all the way. If prolonged idling move out of bays.
    4. Use SCBA during overhaul. Use air monitoring to know when it's safe to remove SCBA
    How old are you? How long have you been on your department? What is your rank?
    RK
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    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

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    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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    While you cannot PREVENT cancer you can MINIMIZE your risks and you hit the nail on the head with the ones you've suggested. I am a huge stickler on wearing SCBA during overhaul and showering after every fire unless we get those damn back to back fires but what can you do. Another suggestion is to eat healthy or pick the healthiest choice when brown bagging it because of those back to back runs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsb View Post
    STOP USING TOBACCO. ALL OF IT.

    The smoke stinks, and the spit is just friggin' gross.
    Very good input. That is a huge issue in the fire service
    Quote Originally Posted by O501 View Post
    At the earliest opportunity that you know that you will no longer need full PPE, immeidately remove your hood. Contaminants in the hood are pressing against your throat. Sweat, open pores and such will cause you to absorb carcinogens. Wash your hood ASAP, and use a second hood, if available. Your thyroid will thank you.

    Edit:

    Do not bring any of your gear into any living areas inside the station, even for a minute. Look into having plymovents installed in the station to capture diesel exhaust, and clean exhaust technology for new apparatus.
    I never though of that with the hood. That's defiantly something to look into and get everyone a second hood

    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a View Post
    How old are you? How long have you been on your department? What is your rank?
    I'm sorry but I don't see how this affects trying to make a list of ways to minimize cancer in the fire service.
    Quote Originally Posted by firedan525 View Post
    While you cannot PREVENT cancer you can MINIMIZE your risks and you hit the nail on the head with the ones you've suggested. I am a huge stickler on wearing SCBA during overhaul and showering after every fire unless we get those damn back to back fires but what can you do. Another suggestion is to eat healthy or pick the healthiest choice when brown bagging it because of those back to back runs.
    If you wouldn't mind telling me at what point do you deem it safe to remove your SCBA. What is your department sop on air monitoring.

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    See your doctor regularly. Get yearly physicals, baseline blood draw followed by yearly blood draws.

    When the rig is parked in quarters after a fire, leave the windows down so the cab can air out.
    IAFF

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    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a View Post
    How old are you? How long have you been on your department? What is your rank?
    Yeah, I too am curious of the relevance of your questions regarding the OPs posting.
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    The eyes absorb chemicals and toxins the fastest. The genitals are second. What I'm getting at is WASH THE HANDS!!!
    Last edited by dfelix22000us; 01-29-2014 at 09:38 AM.

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    Don't eat or drink anything without washing your face and hands first.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Don't eat or drink anything without washing your face and hands first.
    A fire chief and a police chief were at a public safety conference. During a break they both used the restroom. The fire chief finished his business at the urinal at the same time as the police chief. The fire chief walked towards the door when the police chief threw a shot at the fire chief...

    "At the Police Academy, they taught us that we had to wash our hands after using the urinal"...

    The fire chief answered...

    "Well, at the Fire Academy, they taught us not to **** on our hands"....
    Last edited by DeputyChiefGonzo; 01-29-2014 at 05:52 PM.
    firedan525 likes this.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    You nailed most of them on the head.

    Dermal absorption of diesel fuel is an ongoing exposure when fueling apparatus. Wear medical gloves during refueling to reduce this risk. Use the locking mechanism on the fuel nozzle and step away from the apparatus while fueling to reduce exposure to carcinogenic fumes.

    Here in California we have cancer presumption legislation. Many are unaware that the initial burden of proof falls on the firemen to prove exposures on the job. Although this thread is how to prevent cancer, a successful cancer claim begins with records of exposures (fires) over the course of employment. The tracking can be personally done at the firehouse in a log book, or through a exposure reporting system. Either way, track them.

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    The problem with using the automatic shut mechanism for many trucks is by the time the nozzle senses that the tank is full diesel is spewing from the fill neck and now you have a diesel fuel spill to deal with.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    The problem with using the automatic shut mechanism for many trucks is by the time the nozzle senses that the tank is full diesel is spewing from the fill neck and now you have a diesel fuel spill to deal with.
    Not to mention the places where the auto shutoff has been disabled due to local regulations.

    A note on washing PPE - you need to document each time the gear is washed. And you should check with the gear manufacturer about how many times it can/should be washed.

    Don't forget the interior of the apparatus. When you jump in with your contaminated gear after a fire, some of that stuff "rubs off" onto everything your gear touches. Putting your hand on the seat as you're getting in, then touching your eyes is just as bad as anything else.
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by O501 View Post
    At the earliest opportunity that you know that you will no longer need full PPE, immeidately remove your hood. Contaminants in the hood are pressing against your throat. Sweat, open pores and such will cause you to absorb carcinogens. Wash your hood ASAP, and use a second hood, if available. Your thyroid will thank you.
    I'm sorry, but I've heard this before from my training department and have to say this sounds ludicrous. Supplementing your diet with a quality iodine supplement will do more for protecting your thyroid and testicles (also breasts, ladies) than removing your hood. I get jokes all the time over the handfuls of supplements I take every day, but I have countless hours of my own research, as well as consultation with my physician to back it up. Firefighter's diets suck. Avoid chemicals in processed foods, fast foods, and wash your veggies.

    I haven't run a fire in months, but last shift I sanitized my medical equipment, cleaned the bathroom, mopped, degreased some equipment... Take a long hard look at the cleaning chemicals your dept supplies and read the MSDS sheets. Degreasers, sanitizers, sanitizing wipes, glass cleaners, floor strippers/cleaners... You will find some dangerous ingredients with disturbing health effects. We have a common degreaser that is purple in color that contains a known teratogen. The MSDS basically says you should be wearing a respirator and Tyvek suit when you use it. We also have access to Simple Green, which is my degreaser of choice. Protect yourself from these chemicals. Exposure over a career adds up.

    So...
    Rule #1 Eat healthy and take the right vitamins
    Rule #5 Protect yourself from chemicals
    ...at this time.

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    Want to prevent cancer? Avoid everything on planet earth...that should just about to do it.

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    Daily documentation of all emergency and shift activity. Individual log. After each call, or at the end of the shift, each personal was suggested, (not ordered) to maintain a short call event summary, including a brief description of what he did, where he was, for how long, impressions, wind direction if possible, smoke conditions, etc..

    It made it easier to determine if personnel might have been exposed to particularly dangerous conditions, or conditions later determined to be dangerous. We all had a small daily fire activity diary. Individual. Years later it would be educational to just read through all the various activity. How you forgot what you actually did. HB of CJ (old coot)

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    Quote Originally Posted by HBofCJ View Post
    Daily documentation of all emergency and shift activity. Individual log. After each call, or at the end of the shift, each personal was suggested, (not ordered) to maintain a short call event summary, including a brief description of what he did, where he was, for how long, impressions, wind direction if possible, smoke conditions, etc..

    It made it easier to determine if personnel might have been exposed to particularly dangerous conditions, or conditions later determined to be dangerous. We all had a small daily fire activity diary. Individual. Years later it would be educational to just read through all the various activity. How you forgot what you actually did. HB of CJ (old coot)
    I started to do that when I first got hired but like so much else along the way it got sidelined. I wish I would have continued it because it would have been a cool thing to pass down to my sons.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    don't tell that to the guys that have passed or are battling thyroid right now,

    meant to quote the guy that said getting cancerous materials through the hood was
    'ludicrous"

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    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a View Post
    How old are you? How long have you been on your department? What is your rank?
    I think the intent here might have been to warn you about some backlash from the more senior members at the department. Sometimes these "new" or "safety" precautions can be met with some ridicule because the new generation "doesn't get it" or are "soft", at least thats what I think he might be eluding to, just a guess though.

    Just because the guys may ridicule the information doesn't mean its bad info and not worth posting, i say go for it!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mowgli25 View Post
    I'm making a flyer to post around the station since I have noticed many thing that we can do to help prevent cancer. Some are so simple but many do not even try to do them. Please give me you options on simple things we can do to help our brothers and sisters out.

    My list so far.

    1 wash gear after all fires. Including your helmet!
    2. Shower after fires. Cold water first to rinse yourself off. Not hot first since it will open your pores up.
    3. Keep idling to a minimum in the bays. If you are idling in the bays have both bay doors open all the way. If prolonged idling move out of bays.
    4. Use SCBA during overhaul. Use air monitoring to know when it's safe to remove SCBA
    +1 on washing all gear. Circul-Air offers a great washer and dryer; www.firehousegoods.com

    Mike

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