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Thread: Region 9 jobs

  1. #21
    Forum Member DullChainz's Avatar
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    From my experience it's your previous supervisors they'll be interested in talking to.


  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by fire49 View Post
    do not put your girlfriend, next door neighbor, teacher or the like, I like to hear from firefighters or people you have worked with
    These are all firefighters... one of which was my Chief. Can I put my cat down as a reference? lol
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  3. #23
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    I'm a bit late to this, but you have already received some very good advice.

    As far as making your resume look good, have somebody read over it who has fairly decent writing skills. It might seem trivial to worry about spelling and grammar when you are being hired to push dirt, but having a resume that looks like it was written in crayon will put you in the not this year pile.

    Take the time to explain your work history. You don't need to write a book, but give enough that someone reading it will understand what kind of work you do.

    If you tailor it to the job, make sure you get the agency name right. If you are applying to the United States Forest Service, don't put down National Forest Service or United States Department of Forestry.

    I got a fairly decent resume from a candidate last year, including a cover letter telling me what an honor it would be to work for the California Department of Forestry. Nice letter, but I was hiring for the United States Forest Service. Again seems trivial but an error like that doesn't send the message that you are serious about the job.


    Absolutely agree with Dullchainz, get out there and talk to some captains. Those who are too far to visit, get online and find some office numbers and at least give some a call. We literally get hundreds of applications and probably 80-90% look the same on paper.

    I do call past supervisors and listen to what they have to say. I also listen to what they don't have to say.

    As far as the pack test, get out there and start doing something. It is an awkward test, a very fast walk with weight. I know of people who struggle with the test but are mountain goats on the fire line. Have also run across people that can smoke the test, but don't do so great in the field. Personally I find using a treadmill set to 4 mph is a good way to get used to the pace. While that may help you pass the test, if you think you are out of shape you probably are. Start getting some regular exercise. I would aim for being able to complete a 3 mile run and start working on your hiking with at least 20 lbs.

    You will be given the pack test when you arrive for work. If you fail, you have no job so you want to know you will pass before you show up that first day.

  4. #24
    Forum Member DullChainz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Here and there View Post
    I'm a bit late to this, but you have already received some very good advice.

    As far as making your resume look good, have somebody read over it who has fairly decent writing skills. It might seem trivial to worry about spelling and grammar when you are being hired to push dirt, but having a resume that looks like it was written in crayon will put you in the not this year pile.

    Take the time to explain your work history. You don't need to write a book, but give enough that someone reading it will understand what kind of work you do.

    If you tailor it to the job, make sure you get the agency name right. If you are applying to the United States Forest Service, don't put down National Forest Service or United States Department of Forestry.

    I got a fairly decent resume from a candidate last year, including a cover letter telling me what an honor it would be to work for the California Department of Forestry. Nice letter, but I was hiring for the United States Forest Service. Again seems trivial but an error like that doesn't send the message that you are serious about the job.


    Absolutely agree with Dullchainz, get out there and talk to some captains. Those who are too far to visit, get online and find some office numbers and at least give some a call. We literally get hundreds of applications and probably 80-90% look the same on paper.

    I do call past supervisors and listen to what they have to say. I also listen to what they don't have to say.

    As far as the pack test, get out there and start doing something. It is an awkward test, a very fast walk with weight. I know of people who struggle with the test but are mountain goats on the fire line. Have also run across people that can smoke the test, but don't do so great in the field. Personally I find using a treadmill set to 4 mph is a good way to get used to the pace. While that may help you pass the test, if you think you are out of shape you probably are. Start getting some regular exercise. I would aim for being able to complete a 3 mile run and start working on your hiking with at least 20 lbs.

    You will be given the pack test when you arrive for work. If you fail, you have no job so you want to know you will pass before you show up that first day.

    But no matter how many times you say you work for the Forest Service, it will always be the "forestry service" and you jump out of airplanes.

  5. #25
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    Speaking of cover letters, necessary or not? And is it appropriate to write them as non-tailored-- I am applying to the NPS, BLM, Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife service-- all through USAJobs, so I figure something generic might make more sense than to try and tailor them.

    I went through my resumť a couple times (had a few things change on me after I wrote the bloody thing!), and I am a decent writer-- I chose my finest marker to write it in; crayons are so last year! Maybe I will have someone review it though: it can't hurt!

    Yeah I absolutely understand about the test, I may actually have to start hitting the gym. Been running outdoors when the weather is good, but out of the last week, it has snowed atleast 3/4's of that! lol

    Thanks so much!
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  6. #26
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    No a cover letter is not required, and in fact they are actually rather rare.

    Applying for the Federal agencies is quite different than almost any other job, because it is almost entirely based on your application package. It is possible for you to be offered a job with your only interaction being, I'm calling to offer you a job, yes or no.

    Because of this it is very important to
    A) make some contact with those who are hiring so they know you are interested.
    B) make sure your application package tells the hiring officials everything you want them to know about you, because that may be all you get to say.

    I know this sounds kind of dumb, but there are people who apply for jobs that they actually are not that interested in. I have had people turn down a job offer. Usually it was because they are really hoping for a different job and they decide to take their chances, but some don't really understand what the job they applied for is all about. Had a guy a few years ago, and after talking with him for a bit, he told us that he doesn't really like getting dirty, doesn't like hiking and is used to be the guy in charge. He also had a family and didn't want to be away from them too much. After describing the job to him he asked to be taken off the hiring list.

    Anyway, cover letters, no you don't need to do one, and yes if you decide to do one, a generic type is acceptable. I would say the benefit to a cover letter would be to take the time to tell us why you want the job, what you have done to prepare yourself for the job, and why we would want to hire you.

    I would also highly recommend you have someone look over your resume for spelling / grammar and awkward sentences. You would be amazed at the stuff that can slip past you. You know what you meant to say and your brain will often read what you meant to say, not what you actually wrote.

  7. #27
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    Seems like a funny job to just apply to... I mean I can see the transition from someone in Marketing to Accounting perhaps, but not from that kind of a sedentary managerial lifestyle to grunt work... People lol.

    Not sure if you can shed some light for me, but how does USAJobs work? I mean like who reviews them, and how long does that take? And is it someone else who reviews them first before forwarding them on to the actual hiring official? All my applications say received, but under the little (?) there's a bunch of categories like 'referred'-- how long does it take to be referred.

    Sorry I hope that's clear, couldn't figure the best way to say that!

  8. #28
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    When you apply for the job your application package goes to the agencies HR office where it is rated. That person doing the rating most likely knows nothing about the job you are applying for. They have a list of requirements that must be met, and that is what they go off of. This first step is why you really need to spell out what you did in your jobs, the exact titles of your training etc. The rater does not know about the job and can not assume anything. If it is not clearly stated you didn't do it. I've seen people with several years of firefighting experience not qualify for a position because they didn't put anything on their resume about fighting wildland fires. I believe this is where the referred part comes in. It just means you have been rated and meet the minimum qualifications.

    The next step the local unit (park, forest etc) requests a list of qualified applicants. This is usually where the individual supervisors get involved with temporary hiring.

    Permanent hiring has a more complex process and the supervisors have less input.
    Last edited by Here and there; 02-17-2014 at 01:42 AM.

  9. #29
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    Double post

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