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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricUlner View Post
    A TPB provides its own impact absorption. Impact absorption also takes place via:

    -hardware flexion
    -tightening of system knots/bends/hitches
    -friction of rope across edges and/or carabiners, and/or pulley bearings.
    -"sloshiness" of body receiving impact
    -elongation of rope
    -elongation of webbing, including harness
    So that basically sounds like a no its not necessary but it can't hurt if you really wanted to put it on?


  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynBravest View Post
    So that basically sounds like a no its not necessary but it can't hurt if you really wanted to put it on?
    As a general answer to that question, and in the rescue world where 2-person loads are often the case, I say leave the additional shock absorber out of the equation. In belay systems, give careful consideration to fall distance, especially with 2-person loads. The last thing you want happening to dude(s) on the end of the rope is to hit something that protrudes into the fall path, or the ground/floor (whatever the case). With many belay systems, especially with 2-person loads, the impact absorption qualities within the system can allow the load to hit the ground when within 10-15 feet of the ground. It is often counter-intuitive for folks, but the most dangerous part of an op is typically not 50 or 150 feet off the ground. It's the bottom 10 or so, where the belay is primarily for looks only. And this is especially the case if you're using nylon rope, as oppose to polyester. Another significant variable that I didn't mention earlier is the amount of rope in service between the belay mechanism and the load. The more in service, the more stretch. Something to think about, especially in industry where there is often the temptation to redirect the belay back to the floor level for convenience purposes.

  3. #23
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    Awesome answer thank you.

    Regardless I iust discovered our 3 screamers that we even own were put in service in 97'... Obviously it promptly took them out of service.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricUlner View Post
    A TPB provides its own impact absorption. Impact absorption also takes place via:

    -hardware flexion
    -tightening of system knots/bends/hitches
    -friction of rope across edges and/or carabiners, and/or pulley bearings.
    -"sloshiness" of body receiving impact
    -elongation of rope
    -elongation of webbing, including harness
    All true and correct. I have caught 500 lb loads on a 1 meter drop using tandem prusiks with no screamers, load limiters, load releasing hitches, etc.

    Mike

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynBravest View Post
    In NY, the roof man brings a single bag of 150-200' of rope to the roof with a lowering device. Safety lines aren't put into the equation for whatever reason. Probably because the roof man is carrying so much weight as is. Its being brought to the roof for everything not just if a rescue is called. Its always there as a proactive measure.
    With just a single line the MPD would be a good way to go. Assuming you get 12mm rope...
    Last edited by MichaelXYZ; 02-12-2014 at 04:13 AM.

  6. #26
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    In NYC every member is equipped with a gemtor harness, PSS and XL ladder carabiner on the waist. The XL carabiner is used for multiple things the main one being as a lowering device/rappelling. We only carry 150' of braided nylon rope to the roof. Granted every member is trained in the operation and is supposed to practice the evolution every Monday and Tuesday.

    In my volunteer department, aside from all the technical rope equipment we have a bag of rope that's meant to be taken in the same manor, problem is nearly none of these guys is trained in using it and until I went through it, all that was in the bag was a rope with no hardware whatsoever.

    I kind of tasked myself with trying to teach the simplest method of giving these guys a bare minimum method of getting a quick roof operation done. Every member has a harness but no means of lowering like FDNY does. I would have to pick the best option to put in the bag, right now it's a rescue 8.

    Granted there is very few places ropes could have potential use in my home town, there no reason they shluldnt know the most basic operations.

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