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Thread: PPE requirement

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    Default PPE requirement

    For a small gasoline tank leaking fuel (total fuel leaked out less than one gallon), what would be your level of PPE for personnel? Activities include putting oil dry out and attempting to plug the leak.

    Thanks!

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    Bunker pants and gloves. Wouldn't attempt to fix the leak. To much liability!

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    Quote Originally Posted by D.sinesi View Post
    Bunker pants and gloves. Wouldn't attempt to fix the leak. To much liability!
    I would add gloves and helmet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by D.sinesi View Post
    Bunker pants and gloves. Wouldn't attempt to fix the leak. To much liability!
    So you would allow gasoline to keep leaking, run downhill into a storm drain or worse- find an ignition source like the cat converter of the cop's car (parked too close of course....)

    What's a greater liability- stopping the leak by shoving a wooden dowel into the hole or some other kind of temporary patch method, or allowing it to do the above?
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    For the record, we only try to stop the leak as to prevent it from getting worse. This isn't am attempt to get them on their way with a "repair."

    I've always done bunker pants, helmet, and gloves depending on what I'm actually doing. The thought was brought to me about full bunker gear in case of a fire. Is that overkill? For this specific situation, wearing a jacket would have gotten it soaked in gasoline (attempting g to stop leak) and would have rendered the jacket useless to me (more like a liability to me) on the truck fire we had 15 minutes later at another location.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    So you would allow gasoline to keep leaking, run downhill into a storm drain or worse- find an ignition source like the cat converter of the cop's car (parked too close of course....)

    What's a greater liability- stopping the leak by shoving a wooden dowel into the hole or some other kind of temporary patch method, or allowing it to do the above?
    One gallon total.
    Absorbent used.
    I doubt there's a huge problem with flowing fuel.

    Flowing fuel can be diked to prevent it from getting away from us.

    I agree that a temporary plug or patch is a good idea to stop or considerably slow a leak.

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    The next call doesn't change what is safe or acceptable at the current one. If for some reason you can't go or are limited in what tasks you can perform, that's what the rest of the department and mutual aid are for.

    Full bunker gear, and if it were me, I'd even put on the SCBA. If whatever you were doing would have caused you to get gasoline on your bunker coat, did you not get gasoline on the areas that coat is designed to protect? What happens if a static spark or anything else causes an ignition?

    Fully geared, if the gasoline catches fire, your gear takes the brunt of the damage while your department tries to put you out. Anywhere you don't have gear on, your body is what is taking the damage.

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    I personally think full PPE with scba is a little bit of overkill for a less than one gallon leak that is contained with oil dry. Larger spills/leaks, possibly. With the leak being under the car and being way from it for the most part except for trying to stop the leak, I don't think you are facing any major challenges as long as you control your surroundings to ensure there isn't anything to create a spark.

    Also, for a small department like mine, you have to consider the next call. I would consider it quite foolish to intentionally allow your turnout coat to get gasoline on it knowing you may not get a chance to clean it. Not saying it won't happen, just saying if you can avoid it you should.

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    If there is no way to stop the leak without getting "soaked" in gasoline then I am not going to try and stop the leak. I will look to see which way the gas was flowing and put oil dry in place as a dike to block the spill. Then use either more oil dry or pads to clean up the puddle of fuel.

    A gallon of fuel is a piece of cake to clean up.
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    Why a helmet?
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bones42 View Post
    Why a helmet?
    meteors ------
    ?

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    We get those kind of calls at gas stations occaisionally. If you eliminate nearby sources of ignition (ie: cars) there's no real hazard. Bunker pants and gloves so you don't get the kitty litter dust on your uniform pants. If it's a relatively warm day, a gallon will evaporate before long, problem solved. Just block off the area until it does. We don't crawl under anything to stop a leak. If it takes anything more than crouching down, we don't mess with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slackjawedyokel View Post
    meteors ------

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