1. #1
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    Question No more rechargable flashlights making the switch.

    Anyone one else making switch from the high price always dead rechargeable batteries to disposable alkaline for your flashlights. We have found alkaline is the only way to go. Walmarts open 24/7 batteries are always available. That not the case for the rechargables.
    Always a day late and a dollar short!

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    Quote Originally Posted by coldfront View Post
    Anyone one else making switch from the high price always dead rechargeable batteries to disposable alkaline for your flashlights. We have found alkaline is the only way to go. Walmarts open 24/7 batteries are always available. That not the case for the rechargables.
    Yes and on the new airpacks and pretty much anything else we can.

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    Ours are always kept in the charger, and I've had no real problems with them at all. Mostly Streamlight brand, some Pelican. Are you talking about AA, C, D type batteries BTW?? Our are the bigger lights.

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    We made the switch due to always finding rechargeable flashlights that fade away quickly while in use.Then they most be recharged.Alkaline an be change on scene.Many outlets like walmart are open 24/7.This allow a support person to re-supply use as needed.We still use the large litebox that our rechargeable but they fade away quickly.We switch to alkaline streamlight survivor series.
    Always a day late and a dollar short!

    Hillbilly Irish!

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    Take a look at the date code of the battery. If it's a NiCad that's more than 3 years old, then likely it's met the end of it's service life.

    Also, take a look at the charger. Is it a fast charger, or a trickle charger? A fast charger tends to harm the battery more. On Streamlight Survivor LED's, the 12V direct wire kit (90519, 90509 and 90528) are Fast Chargers. Put your hand on the light when it's been in the charger for a while, it's hot. That heat tells you that the charger is continually trying force electrons into the battery.

    On the other hand, the standard chargers (90513, 90503 and 90523), are slow rate chargers. When the battery is fully charged, the charger lowers the charging rate and trickle charges the battery. This will make your batteries last a lot longer.

    Also, most manufacturers are still using substandard battery chemistry. NiCad is the old standby, but it develops a memory effect. NiMH is a bit better, but it self-discharges if not used. Lithium-Ion is the good stuff. It has more milliamp hours by weight than other chemistries.

    Right now we're changing about 45 trucks from Pelican Big Ed's to Streamlight Survivor LED. The Big Ed is a good light, but Pelican over chargers for replacement bulbs, and they force you to buy a standard output, and a low output bulb together.
    The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened. --Norman Mattoon Thomas, 6 time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party of America

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    Most rechargeable batteries are capable of a limited number of charges.

    Depending on your usage, and the operation of the charging system, that's gonna come out to the three years tgxp mentions.

    Radio batteries can sometimes be put through a battery conditioner which deep-cycles them under controlled circumstances. A full reconditioning can take 24 hours, but can improve performance. But the conditioners aren't cheap, and generally don't exist for "consumer" batteries.

    I'm in the process of getting some replacement batteries for our LightBoxes. They're way over age and show it.
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

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