1. #1
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    Default NFPA 1410 Engine Company Drills

    Hey, just wanted share six NFPA 1410 Engine Company Drills that I created for my blog. All the drills have been made into PDF files so that you can easily download, print out, and use for your next training night.

    The most recent post is Engine Company Drills in Review which gives an overview of all the training scenarios.

    The individual scenarios are:
    1. Forward Lay
    2. Reverse Lay
    3. Two Engines, Two Hydrants
    4. The Gated Wye
    5. Drafting with Two Engines
    6. Portable Water Supply

    Hope you like them! Would love your feedback!

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    Hi, I just noticed I had an error in the Reverse Lay post. The link to the PDF was not setup correctly.

    If you were not able to download the PDF you can get it by going here, for the Reverse Lay PDF

    Really sorry for anyone who clicked the link and got a page not found.

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    I don't mean to sound like a dick, but what are you offering that isn't available multiple other places?
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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    A valid point.

    The NFPA 1410 drills have been available for a long time, the first edition of the standard was released in 1966, and there are quick references provided by other sources (Fire Fighter Close Calls).

    But, the reason you see it in multiple other places is because this training is important. The act of referencing it shows it's importance, and might just increase the odds a fire fighter, fire officer or department that was unaware of this training finds it.

    This is my view of this training, presented in a different, more digestible, format. You are free to take whatever you want from what I posted.

    I am sorry that you apparently got no value from it. In the end it is my hope that someone learns something from it, and maybe operates with a little more knowledge and a little safer at their next fire.

    If you have suggestions for improvement let me know, my program lets me treat these training scenarios as a living document which can easily be changed or improved.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IncidentSmart View Post
    A valid point.

    The NFPA 1410 drills have been available for a long time, the first edition of the standard was released in 1966, and there are quick references provided by other sources (Fire Fighter Close Calls).

    But, the reason you see it in multiple other places is because this training is important. The act of referencing it shows it's importance, and might just increase the odds a fire fighter, fire officer or department that was unaware of this training finds it.

    This is my view of this training, presented in a different, more digestible, format. You are free to take whatever you want from what I posted.

    I am sorry that you apparently got no value from it. In the end it is my hope that someone learns something from it, and maybe operates with a little more knowledge and a little safer at their next fire.

    If you have suggestions for improvement let me know, my program lets me treat these training scenarios as a living document which can easily be changed or improved.
    First of all, I did not anywhere say there was no value. What I said was this is nothing new and that there are multiple versions of these already out there. It is like many things I suppose, most people prefer Heinz Ketsup but some like Hunts. Both do the same job but with a differing flavor.

    I do have a comment though, in your gated wye presentation please explain how you flow 100 gpm out of one line and 200 gpm out of the other.

    Good luck with your project.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
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    To achieve the recommended flow in the gated wye scenario some things would depend on the equipment your department uses in order to figure out the math.

    For my department we would be using 300' of 3" line to the gated wye, with a 150' of 1-3/4" for the attack line and 150' of 2-1/2" for the backup line, and combination nozzles on both lines.

    Running the numbers pressure would look something like

    100psi tip + 22psi 1-3/4" + 25psi appliance + 18psi 3" = 165psi required from the pump

    The friction loss for 200GPM out of a 2-1/2" (its about 12psi) is less than that for 100GPM of 1-3/4" so we would have a few extra pounds at the tip of the 2-1/2" but not enough that you would need to worry too much, you could always gate it back at either the wye or at the tip if you felt that it was too much to handle.

    The numbers asked for by NFPA 1410 are minimums, so you are always safe flowing a little more. If you wanted to be really scientific you could go out to the tips and use a pitot gauge at the end to test it out and adjust based on the gauge.

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    Running 2 different sized lines off from a wye is not something done in his area.
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    As such, you can run this scenario using two lines of the same size pushing at least 200 GPM out of both lines.

    Your 1-3/4 inch lines could potentially be run at 200 GPM. Your friction loss is getting up there being about 68 pounds of friction loss for 1-3/4 alone.

    You may find running it with two sets of 2" hose would work much better as your friction loss is only 36 pounds for 150'.

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    The town I live in runs 2 inch hand lines exclusively. We flow from 160 to 300 gpm through them out to 300 feet.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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