Like Tree3Likes
  • 2 Post By SBLGFD
  • 1 Post By FWDbuff

Thread: Platform Must-Have Option

  1. #1
    Forum Member
    efd281's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    El Dorado, Kansas
    Posts
    225

    Lightbulb Platform Must-Have Option

    We are preparing to go to bid for a new AP and before we finalize our RFP, I wanted to see if you all would shoot me your thought. All brands, models, and materials aside...(Read as: I don't care what flavor you like your Kool-Aid.) what is the single most beneficial option that you either have or would put on your AP. We are a smaller department and don't get to order $1m trucks often, so we want to make sure we don't miss out on something great. Thanks for your suggestions in advance!!
    I have but one ambition in life and that is to become a firefighter.

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,756

    Default

    Based on what we are currently going through with my Departments......a good local service company.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    North East Wi. USA
    Posts
    267

    Default

    Good lighting.

    Don't skimp on the lighting - around the truck, beyond the truck - (flood style) and lighting up the ladder and around the basket. We went with all LED and its been very good. A mix of 12 volt and 110 volt LED floods due to amount and limitations of 12 volt circuits up the boom was required.

    Also went with a very tight LED spot mounted left and right in line with the rotation of the tower. Light is used for spotting where the rotation point of the ladder is on the building. We wanted some type of what could best be described as a laser light but at that time could not find anything that was applicable. So we sent with the LED tight spot.

    SBLGFD
    MemphisE34a and RangerJake72 like this.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,954

    Default

    Three sided lip edge on the bucket. No matter what you'll find that you can't get a perfect position every time, and those buckets with just a front lip make ingress/egress to and from upper windows and roofs it a bit dicey. The three sided edges allow you to always be able to place footing very close the the building, far less acrobatics to and from the bucket.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SBLGFD View Post
    Also went with a very tight LED spot mounted left and right in line with the rotation of the tower. Light is used for spotting where the rotation point of the ladder is on the building. We wanted some type of what could best be described as a laser light but at that time could not find anything that was applicable. So we sent with the LED tight spot.

    SBLGFD
    Idea I'd never heard of. Is this to assist getting into position before dropping into the building?

  6. #6
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    North East Wi. USA
    Posts
    267

    Default

    The idea - and it works pretty well - is you can see where the rotation point of the ladder is in relationship to the building as you are coming onto the scene. The lights are controlled from the drivers and officers seat.

    Would work better especially in the bright daylight if it were more of a laser light, again we couldn't find anything like that at the time.

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SBLGFD View Post
    The idea - and it works pretty well - is you can see where the rotation point of the ladder is in relationship to the building as you are coming onto the scene. The lights are controlled from the drivers and officers seat.

    Would work better especially in the bright daylight if it were more of a laser light, again we couldn't find anything like that at the time.
    Ahh I get it, this helps line the turntable up with the objective. Pretty interesting idea, is yours mid or reamount?

  8. #8
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    North East Wi. USA
    Posts
    267

    Default

    Rear Mount

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,456

    Default

    skylights in the ceiling/roof of the cab, for the Driver and Officer to look up and out on either side of the main to see wires and other overhead obstructions to help spot the rig.
    RangerJake72 likes this.

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    efd281's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    El Dorado, Kansas
    Posts
    225

    Default

    FWDbuff, this is a great idea. Do you have any examples of this or is this just something you wish that they would do?

  11. #11
    Forum Member
    efd281's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    El Dorado, Kansas
    Posts
    225

    Default

    The skylight, multi-point lip, and pin-point spot options are great suggestions. Keep them coming.

  12. #12
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,456

    Default

    When I was a federal firefighter (Dept of the Army) I worked on two 1991 Pierce Arrow 100' Quints (US Army spec) that had these "skylights" in the cab roof. Never saw them on any other ladder again. I can tell you I used them religiously and found them to be of great value.

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    FFWALT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Our newest platform has LED spot lights that illuminate where the outriggers will be. Not the best in daylight but it takes some of the guess work out of where the outriggers will be at night, helps spot between vehicles and spot obstructions as well.
    Anchor points, you can't really have to many in a platform.
    In my opinion a pre plumbed waterway is a must. Some builders have them enclosed in the aerial structure and some have a "rescue" position that keeps it out of way when doing basic truck work. Just keep in mind that if they are exposed on the bottom and are not retractable they may provide a hindrance when trying to get the ladder close to the building.
    Along with the pre plumbed waterway, make sure your monitor(s) have a pressure gauge that is visible from the platform position. On our new platform they are built into the monitor, on our 2002 we simply put an inline gauge on the unused platform discharge. This way the members in the platform can relay to the pedestal position what their pressure is and the pump operator can adjust as needed. Eliminates all the potential variables in figuring friction loss.
    If you go with dual monitors look at one solid bore and one automatic that is designed to operate at 80 psi. Keeps everyone happy.
    Look at the means each builder provides to transition from the platform to the roof over a parapet. Some require attaching a roof ladder to brackets while others have ladders that are already in place and just need swung down. Not a deal breaker for any builder, just something to look at.
    Consider a storage box on the outside of the platform for ladder belts and hoses to connect to the aerial mounted air supply.
    I'm a fan of big engines. First, these babies aren't light. Second, with a pre plumbed waterway you can move a lot of water easily. If you chose to go with a pump on your platform it will allow you to get more than the rated capacity out of the pump provided you can get it in the pump.
    Think about how you want to store you equipment and spec the truck around it. If you only run one then this might not be as big of deal but standardization works great if you can do it. Even if it's from the "Old one" to the "New one".
    Not really an aerial specific option but consider putting a standard "West Coast" style mirror on the drivers side and a "Bus style" mirror on the officers side. Once you sit with a person in the officers seat of an apparatus with this mirror option you will truly understand the benefits of this set up.
    Good luck,
    Walt

  14. #14
    Forum Member
    Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,756

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FFWALT View Post
    ..Not really an aerial specific option but consider putting a standard "West Coast" style mirror on the drivers side and a "Bus style" mirror on the officers side. Once you sit with a person in the officers seat of an apparatus with this mirror option you will truly understand the benefits of this set up...
    Why not the "Bus style" for drivers side as well?
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bones42 View Post
    Why not the "Bus style" for drivers side as well?
    One of the things we'd learned (from our apparatus consultant) was that many places that get snow have issue with "bus" style mirrors. Apparently the wipers constantly throw snow/sleet onto the mirror? Subsequently, we have all "West Coast", so I cannot verify this. I'm not sure what Walt is speaking over with regard to an officer in his/her seat?

  16. #16
    Forum Member
    FFWALT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Bones42,

    When going for the pre build on our 2009 engine we saw a tractor for a tiller that had bus mirrors on both side. Took a look at them and really liked them because they are in your natural line of sight and make checking them instinctive instead of something you need to remember to do so we put them on our engine. When we got the truck in service we found that it can make using the drivers side mirror to back into the bay somewhat difficult. On that engine I find myself using the officer side mirror because it gives me a better perspective. Overall the members don't like the drivers side bus mirror because it is so different from the rest of the fleet. Just a personal observation but I've noticed when looking at new delivery apparatus there are a lot more running the split option that both bus style.

    RFDACMO2,

    Have you ever noticed when there is someone in the officers seat that it can be difficult to see the mirror? Even a smaller person can cause the obstruction. This is a problem we found on our customs and occasionally a commercial. With the bus style mirror it is in front of the A pillar, in your line of sight and the person in the officers seat basically can't obstruct it.
    We've been running the one engine with two bus mirrors since March of 09 and haven't had any problems due to wipers throwing hard water onto the surface of the mirror and we get snow and sleet. Another great argument for heated mirrors if it becomes a problem, let the stuff slide right off.

    Hope this answers your questions. Please let me know if you have others.
    Walt.

  17. #17
    Forum Member
    efd281's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    El Dorado, Kansas
    Posts
    225

    Default

    Thanks for the replies! We too have talked about the bus mirror on the officer side and the west coast on the driver. Currently looking into a platform mounted camera to relay live video back to the ground. Do any of you have any experience with this?

  18. #18
    Forum Member
    Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,756

    Default

    FFWalt, we switched out the standard mirrors for the bus style on our older engine and everything since comes with the bus on both sides. We experienced the officer blocking the mirror, which prompted the switch. As for harder to back in with the bus style....seems odd as we find them easier to use.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  19. #19
    Forum Member
    FFWALT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Bones,

    The bus style seem easier for driving but they provide a different perspective on the drivers side when backing. Nothing that can't be overcome, just a different point of reference than what you may be used to. Our department is happy with West Coast on the drivers side and bus on the officer side. I think we could get used to the bus on both but since we rotate through stations and have multiple apparatus we are certified on it might be the reason for the department preference.

    Each to their own. I think if we could swap the fleet we'd get used to it quick but you know how the replacement cycle goes.

    Take care,
    Walt

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Enabling PM option
    By FFEMT2159 in forum MembersZone Updates & Information
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-26-2010, 04:23 PM
  2. Which is the best option; Roth IRA or 457(b)
    By hendrixty in forum Career/Paid Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-15-2010, 06:59 PM
  3. Do we get this option......
    By tombstonE85 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 02-15-2008, 02:25 PM
  4. Shorts as a uniform option????
    By toddler71 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 184
    Last Post: 07-29-2006, 11:07 AM
  5. Stainless Steel Option
    By DeptJoe in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-08-2003, 03:04 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register