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  1. #21
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    Feb 2006
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    Default brands of pumps

    I used a Disetronic from 1993 to about 2004 I believe. Disetronics were a good model for a while. I'm now on a minimed 712. I've liked it because of the carb wizard.


  2. #22
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    Knoxville Iowa
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    Default

    those help out alot. i got my pump in the mail, but i won't get it set up until march 1st. mine has a carbsmart type thing too with 500 different choices. pretty cool

  3. #23
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    Default pump brands

    I've found that also the mini med has been very good for dealing with physical activity in that I can immediatly cut things down quickly for when I need to get out there and more or less get into physical activity quickly. I would more or less cut the pump down to around half or more when exercise was involved and I was very glad that I had the flexability to do that.

    Will

  4. #24
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    I have been looking for a forum like this for sometime. Im a 30 yr old FF/EMT. I have been on the job for three years and the only other Diabetic FF that I have met was retired. He worked for the Transport company that I worked for when I was a Volunteer. I think that it is a great forum to keep up, especially right now with all of the innovations they are making with meds and pumps.
    I was denied a job as an ARRF at a major Florida airport due to being a diabetic. This was after I passed the written test that 150 other hopefulls took. Then passed the physical agility test in full gear and on air. Blew through the interview and stress test. When I told the testing doctor I was Diabetic he did everything he could to talk me out of continuing with my testing and then denied me to the chief.
    We need a forum like this to let other firefighters know that not everyone that is diabetic is like the ones that have given up that we run on in the middle of the night. Hell, I am in better shape then 75% of the guys in my Department. Anyway, Im glad this forum is up, I don't feel so alone now. If I can help anyone with any questions I would be more then happy to. I have been Type 1 for twenty years now and have picked up a trick or two. And remember Novolog can be taken after you eat and can withstand higher temps so you can bring it with you.

  5. #25
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    I am diabetic but I dont use the pump. I have been a firefighter since 2003. I started out after Fire Standards as a Vol. and then moved to part time. Once a full time spot was open I was offered it. I work 24 on 48 off. My crew and most of the department knows about my diabeties. If you find a department that has a chief that is enducated and you work hard to watch your sugars you will be successful. If you have any questions shoot me back.

  6. #26
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    Feb 2006
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    Default more healthy than others

    I've been exercising and eating right and since March have lost around 69 pounds. I can now run (on a machine) 1.5 miles in 16min and 34 sec. Besides carb counting I'm now doing 3 miles almost every day and making sure that I keep active.


    Quote Originally Posted by Escottie
    I have been looking for a forum like this for sometime. Im a 30 yr old FF/EMT. I have been on the job for three years and the only other Diabetic FF that I have met was retired. He worked for the Transport company that I worked for when I was a Volunteer. I think that it is a great forum to keep up, especially right now with all of the innovations they are making with meds and pumps.
    I've been looking to get into this kind of work. Of course 10 years ago more or less this wasn't thought of....if it was 10 years ago I'd be doing it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Escottie
    I was denied a job as an ARRF at a major Florida airport due to being a diabetic. This was after I passed the written test that 150 other hopefulls took. Then passed the physical agility test in full gear and on air. Blew through the interview and stress test. When I told the testing doctor I was Diabetic he did everything he could to talk me out of continuing with my testing and then denied me to the chief.
    We need a forum like this to let other firefighters know that not everyone that is diabetic is like the ones that have given up that we run on in the middle of the night. Hell, I am in better shape then 75% of the guys in my Department. Anyway, Im glad this forum is up, I don't feel so alone now. If I can help anyone with any questions I would be more then happy to. I have been Type 1 for twenty years now and have picked up a trick or two. And remember Novolog can be taken after you eat and can withstand higher temps so you can bring it with you.
    I'm on novolog and have been type I for 20years also. I've been working computer jobs more or less the last years but feel its time for a change. I guess I'm trying to figure out where to start with any of these things. Any suggestions are great. Thank You

  7. #27
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    Jun 2005
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    I just found out last week that I am a type 2 diabetic. I was given a perscription and a meter. I also hve to go take a class. I am a Vol. FF and I am afraid to tell the chief or anyone else in the department about this recent health concern. I have a feeling that if they find out they will not allow me to do the things I love to do on calls. They all have a if you have something medically wrong with you, then you shouldnt be here belief. It is very difficult for me to even think that they could be so ignorant. What should I do? Is this something I am responsible to reveal to them tat Iam a diabetic?
    Stay Safe and live long

  8. #28
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    If you have been diagnosed as a type two while you are already on the job NFPA still protects your right to work as a FF. My suggestion would be to talk to the guys on your shift if you are assigned one, or the ones your closest to. Don't let it beat you down. So many people in the service relate all diabetics to the ones we constantly run on. Educate them. But if you are not ready to tell them don't. Just test your sugar alot until you get comfortable with your meds. You dont have to test out in the open.

  9. #29
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    Jan 2007
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    Gretna, NE
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    Default Firemen on insulin pumps

    I am also on an insulin pump and am glad to see I am not the only diabetic firefighter out there! I am using a minimed pump and have a frio pouch that allows me to wear it under my bunker gear and keeps my insulin cool and viable even in fire. I would highly recommend both the pump ( I have had one for 5 years) and the frio pouch. Another thing is to not be shy about being diabetic!! Make sure those you work with or volunteer with not only know that you are but what to look for when you start to go low. If you and your department take it one step at a time there should be no reason that being diabetic should be an issue.

  10. #30
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    Default cooler pack for pump

    Quote Originally Posted by GVFD73 View Post
    I am also on an insulin pump and am glad to see I am not the only diabetic firefighter out there! I am using a minimed pump and have a frio pouch that allows me to wear it under my bunker gear and keeps my insulin cool and viable even in fire. I would highly recommend both the pump ( I have had one for 5 years) and the frio pouch. Another thing is to not be shy about being diabetic!! Make sure those you work with or volunteer with not only know that you are but what to look for when you start to go low. If you and your department take it one step at a time there should be no reason that being diabetic should be an issue.
    Was wondering where you got your cooler pack for you pump at? I just recently joined the local citizens fire academy here and they said that we would be getting involved in some hands on items and using equiptment etc. So I'd like to know more about as to how you've used the pack with your equiptment etc. Thanks

  11. #31

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    Apr 2007
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    Default Firemen on Insulin Pump

    May 1, is the big day for starting out on the local paid on-call department. I survived the last four months of training and ready to go. I have been on a the pump for the last year and a half. I think that being on the pump will help as you can dial down the basal when the pager goes off and it is time to respond. I am sure that there will be some adjustments to be made but nothing in life is consistant and being a diabetic you just have to be able to react to alot of different situations.

  12. #32
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    Default adjustment

    Certainly so there. The other day in cfa we went to the top of the ladder on the truck and for me it was the first time. Also cut apart an old car of course. Must say it was a great experience. I'm of the opinion its probably good to check sugar before a run, check it at least 6 times a day (if you have a mini med you can get the continual glucose monitor option now btw). and also make sure you have some sort of carbs on you for eating just in case something occurs. I'm also of the opinion that if your sugar is around 150's or so, that's premium spot for being in the safe zone. To me being in the 90's even though that is considered normal with doctors, to me its like its on its way down usually. Even people from American diabetes group is now saying that you should treat if your glucose is in that range but not treat it with the same amount of carbs as something lower would be.

    Can't wait to gon on the scba run here when they smoke up the training building.

    Cheers

  13. #33
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    Default Cgm

    A new thing that I have started which has made like 100% easier was the Dexcom CGM. I use that with a Novalog pen. If you have the means I highly recommend using some sort of CGM. It takes the guess work out of your day and it sends alerts to you if your suger goes over 200 and below 80. So with that and a camelbag filled with a couple of PB&J's and a orange juice you don't have to worry about running calls all day and not getting back to the station for food.

  14. #34
    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakebty View Post

    you say " and has successfully become a firefighter" why successfully? under your rights, you can't be discriminated against because you have diabetes unless you have had problems on the job, otherwise your fine. but a pump would be a good choice. i'll get back to you about the pump though
    Young Jakebty... you still have to pass the entrace exam, CPAT, physical and psych exam if you are going to be a career firefighter. I think that is what he meant.

    Earlier in this thread, I posted about having worked with 2 diabetic firefighters. One retired after a heart attack and has since passed away. The other is 19 year veterean and he has an insulin pump. It hasn't affected his job performance in any way.

    Also posted by you..
    i was gonna get the minimed, but we switched to Animas because minimed was taking to long to reply back. i have started thinking about insulin warming up or the pump melting. all of this has crossed my mind. i will try and find out what i can and let you know.
    Jake
    If the pump gets hot enough melt under turnout gear, you would already be severely burned!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  15. #35
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    Jul 2006
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    Default Levemir

    One injection in the morning with Levemir. This is great, so you don't have to worry about getting nocked out on a call without taking your dinner shot. For quick acting try Novalog. It holds up to heat better and comes in a pen so you can keep it in your pocket. If you want a compact, inexpensive meter try the One touch mini. It fits in a front pocket nicely

  16. #36
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    Aug 2003
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    Hello,

    I have been a firefighter since 1994. I began working as a career firefighter in 2003. I was diagnosed with Type I diabetes in 2001 at the age of 22. I used injections for a few years and then switched to the Minimed Paradigm 715 in 2005. Yesterday I received my new 722 and the Real-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring system in the mail. I have training scheduled with my healthcare provider in the next few days. Has anyone here had any experience with this technology yet?

    I'm super-psyched! It will be such a re-assurance during my 24 hour shifts to know my BG is at a decent level. Currently I do finger stick testing around 12 - 14 times a day while on duty. With the new CGM system I will probably be doing finger sticks about 4 - 6 times a day and still be reasonable assured that my BG is good and able to watch the trending.

    I'm not sure where I'm going to wear my new pump. With my 715 I wear it with the waist strap under my clothes and use the remote control to operate it. With the 722 I'm going to need access to the display so I'm going to try to wear it on my belt in the cordura nylon case and see how that goes.

    Any suggestions??
    Thanks

  17. #37
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    Mar 2008
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    Smile

    It's nice to see I am not the only diabetic aspiring firefighter!

    I'm currently training to be a firefighter and hoping that being diabetic will not disqualify me. I've been a type 1 diabetic since I was 16 (I'm 21 now). I'm on shots - Lantus and Humalog - and I have pretty good control. I have no issues recognizing when my blood sugar is getting low and have had very few diabetic emergencies. I'm otherwise quite healthy and in excellent physical shape.

    I have tried to find out whether or not my diabetes will be an issue as a firefighter, though I haven't really gotten a straight answer from anyone. I know the Americans With Disabilities Act is supposed to prohibit that sort of discrimination, but I also know that municipalities can make up all sorts of excuses and give you plenty of red tape if they don't want to hire a potential liability.

    I really, really want to make it through Fire College and become an official firefighter, so I am hoping nothing will get in the way of that. I do not know if any of the firefighters in my city (Gainesville, FL) are diabetic. If I do make it through everything, I'll tell all my colleagues about my diabetes and instruct them on what to do if something ever happens. I'm not shy at all about my diabetes, though I do not want to tell any more people than I have to (human resources and the health assessment people will obviously know) until I am officially a firefighter.

  18. #38

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    Apr 2007
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    Default Info Needed

    CMM10 I would like to talk to you about the real time glucose monitoring supplies if you don't mind. If you would send me an e-mail to jreed1974@sbcglobal.net I have some questions. I have been a type one diabetic for 8 years with a minimed pump. I have been a career firefighter for about 2 years and I am having a little trouble with my insurance. I would like to talk to you.

    Thanks in advance,
    jrjr10

  19. #39

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    Mar 2008
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    Default minimed and testing.

    Quote Originally Posted by PFraser View Post
    I'm also a type 1 on a pump have never had any problems with it while in service. The minimed is a good pump but I think the diestronic Htron plus is a tougher (also waterproof) pump that stands up to what we do a little better. also I carry the gluc tabs and in each truck there is my old stand by a 12oz DR Pepper and a pack of nabs. Also use Humalog and test 4x daily and as needed. Stay safe
    You test 4/day, i have a pump and test 8 to 10 times/day, and I never get to low, even with extended operations. Any one you know Have a implantable sensor.

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