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  1. #1
    Islander
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Clearing snow for hydrant access

    I was wondering how different departments or municipalities ensure that hydrants are clear of snow during the winter months. Do you ask land owners to clear hydrants on their property or is this something your municipal outside workers are responsible for? How does your department or town enforce any bylaws or regulations about winter hydrant access?


  2. #2
    Captain Gonzo
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    We attach hydrant markers in the fall to make finding a hydrant in the snow easier.

    In our second segment of "The Fire Show" (a public affairs program that we do with the Marlborough Cable Trust about the Fire Department and fire safety), we covered a variety of winter sfatey issues, including keeping fire hydrants clear of snow. I find that a lot of people will "adopt a hydrant" and keep it shoveled out in the winter.

    ------------------
    And on the eighth day...God created Firefighters!
    Captain Gonzo

  3. #3
    Dalmatian90
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We flag them. And when neccessary, clear them ourselves. Fortunately we only have 10 or so to worry about Well, a few more at the jail but the inmates keep those shovelled.

    Most years we don't need to shovel any out; some years I've seen the crew going around with a tractor with a bucket!

  4. #4
    FFE3BFD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We have about 100 hydrants in our first due response district. We do make sure that they are cleared of snow after a significant storm.

  5. #5
    9C7
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    Since our hydrants are maintained by the water department, that means they are shovelled by the water department as well. Two passes with a bucket loader usually does the trick.



    ------------------
    Stay Safe.
    You asked for my opinion, now you have it. Any similarity to another opinion, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

  6. #6
    Poin
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We have aprox. 100 hydrants in the borough. If needed, we will put together a work detail to clear the hydrants of snow. We try to educate the residents to keep any hydrant on their property cleared. So far, this has worked rather well. We find more cleared than not cleared when we have to go out.

    ------------------
    Lynn Fernbaugh, Lieutenant 128
    Washington Fire Co. #1
    Mechanicsburg, PA 17055
    wfc@emergencypreplans.com

  7. #7
    Firelover
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Well, here in Dieppe, I've seen in the past the Full Timers going around checking to make sure the hydrants were cleaned off. If they weren't, the department will call the towns public works and they come out and clean it out with a back-ho. We also ask the public to help us out in shoveling out the hydrants. Of course, the public shoveling is totally voluntary, but appreciated.

    ------------------
    Joel

    If you sent us to HELL, WE'D PUT IT OUT!!

  8. #8
    RescueCoFireman
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    In our area the Fire Department is responsible along with the Public Utilities Department. The Public Utilities will attach florescent markers to the plugs in the fall. During the winter we share the responsiblity with the Public Works. Our department also utilizes a hydrant thawing unit that will clear out frozen plugs.

    GB

  9. #9
    WOODMAN
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    With about 350-400 hydrants in our town we do it ourselves.Did it this Sunday after 16 inches of snow took about 3-4 hours to do and sometimes we get lucky and someone did it for us but we do about 95%of them.

  10. #10
    CollegeBuff
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Speaking as a member of the public with a hydrant on our property, I've always made sure the snow is cleared away. One year the FD rolled past as I was doing it. Got a thumbs-up from the driver. I was ten, and my heroes had just "thumbs-uped" me. I was in heaven, hehe. This year though, I overslept. They had to stop and clear it. My family razzed me about it all day.

  11. #11
    FDMichiganMan
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    At school, I have seen the Grounds people clear snow from the hydrants that are on campus. I am not sure about the city.

    At home, I know that the Water and Sewer department clear around the hydrants. I have seen them out late at night shoveling around hydrants.

    Eric

  12. #12
    st34ff
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Red face

    I just had on the other night that fits in perfect with this topic. We were dispacted to a house fire. Chief got there and noticed that the hydrent had the top of it sticking out of the snow. He cleared it out so we could find it and they when we arrived with the engine, we got a shovel and finished shoveling it out. Then we layed into the fire. And of coures the neighbors asked us AFTER we were done shoveling, "need a shovel?"

    Kyle
    St 34 www.chalfontfireco.8m.com

  13. #13
    BayRidge60
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    The town water dept. marks them for us in the fall and they're responsible for digging them out in the winter

    ------------------
    Glenn Ralston
    Firefighter/EMT-D
    Bay Ridge Fire-Rescue
    ralston453@aol.com

  14. #14
    Mr.Meaner
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    My department has it's company Captains organize work details to clear our 500 plus muncipal hydrants. Department provides lunch, and members get LOSAP points.

    We don't do private; hydrants, standpipes, post indicator valves, or outside os&ys - we ask the building owners to do that - but they don't.


  15. #15
    axman
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    In my department we alpha page to get a crew out to dig out the hydrants if the snow gets to deep, usually we get enough people out for the detail.

    ------------------
    STAY SAFE ALL OF MY BROTHERS.

  16. #16
    ceno2749
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Wink

    Being a rural company, we are lucky-- we don't have pressurized hydrants to clear! We use tanker trucks for water and we send another engine out to find a pond or dry hydrant at a creek bridge to fill the tankers with. When we have to clear a dry hydrant, we just quickly shovel it out as it takes 2 men seconds to do. Some companies around us have 4WD pumpers which help out when we pump from a pond. Sometimes though, they still get stuck and we have to get an apparatus with a winch or call the local towing company to come and yank them out of the mud or snow!

    The towns around us that do have pressurized hydrants mark them in the Fall. The residents clear them out when they do the sidewalks.


    [This message has been edited by ceno2749 (edited 01-06-2001).]

  17. #17
    ffnbs
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Wink

    With 900+ hydrants in our city we get help from the courts community service program. We probably end up doing half of them ourselves. The community service program even painted all of our hydrants in the past 2-3 years.

  18. #18
    Tom Erwin
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    In our city the FD makes a canvass of all hydrants in the fall to check the hydrant markers. Any missing markers are reported to the DPW and they will replace the maker. After adequate snows have arrived the Fire Dept. uses a rotating schedule to check and shovel any hydrant needing it. Each company is responsible for a certain area and they must check off on a list each and every hydrant in their area as well note if it required shoveling. This process continues night and day until ALL hydrants are cleared. And it starts all over if more snows come. We also ask the local TV stations to ask residents to please keep "their" hydrant clear, sort of like an adopt a hydrant program.


  19. #19
    MPreb362
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    we get out the shovels and go to work. it not only makes sure that they are cleared but is good to learn where your plugs are for future reference. looking at a map is all and good but when you get to the scene and find out the plug has been moved without any notice to you, well you know. good luck and stay safe

  20. #20
    firecat1524
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    You mean it actually snows enough to cover hydrants? LOL Luckily we don't have that problem too often in SC, but while visiting the in-laws in Wisconsin, I wondered the same thing, but forgot to ask my brother-in-law what his dept does. Thanks for the info.

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