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  1. #1
    flash32
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post traashline in front bumper

    I am trying to figure out how to lay the hose in the front bumper so that when you pull it out it all comes out at one time. Any suggestions would be appreciated. thank you for your time.
    Be safe out there.


    ------------------
    Adam J. Dorn

    These are my opinions and not of any group or org. that i belong to.

  2. #2
    Neptune 33
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Whew, how do I describe this? we have ours on it's side in the well on the bumper, so if we pull up at a wreck, with no fire, and we don't need all the hose, we can disconnect it, and hook it up, so we don't have to repack all of it. but, at a working car fire, it all comes out and we flake it. It seems to work very well.

  3. #3
    trumpeter75
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We triple lay our front bumper on our engine. That way, it ALL comes off when you pull it. I'm not a real big fan of triple lays, but it works OK for the trash line. Triple lays are a pain to repack, though.

  4. #4
    LHS*
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We stand our donuts on end pulls out like a booster reel very slick

  5. #5
    MB1213635
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    100 ft. Each 50 ft in a Double Donut Roll. That way you grab the nozzle and the coupling and go. Everything rolls out nicely.

  6. #6
    LtStick
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We have two ears on ours then fold the hose on top of the ears in two layers. you just grab the ears and pull and it all comees out of the well. Then you just flake it out and your ready to go. We use a 100 feet of hose and it works well.

  7. #7
    mike021
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We use the triple pack on all our lines, you pull the nozzle with the fold through the lever and you pull all the hose at once

  8. #8
    gunnyv
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We carry 100' of rubber 1 1/2 in the bumper. The first 50' is laid in accordion style, and the top 50' is bundles with a seatbelt. You pick up the bundle and take it where you want it, unclip the belt and flake it out.

  9. #9
    Icerader
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We have 75' bumper lines. We paint a white line at half way. We lay the hose in back and forth flat with a short pull loop at the half way point. When we use the line, we grab the pull loop and nozzle and it pays out real nice. Works good for us!

    Capt. Bill

  10. #10
    LHS*
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    If you use 1" hose instead of a 1 1/2" or 3/4" you'll find the line is easier to deploy. Use a 1" female to 1 1/2" increaser and use whatever 1 1/2" or 1 3/4" nozzle you normally use. On a 100 or 150 foot trash line you'll easily flow 100 gpm.

  11. #11
    EastKyFF
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I've seen several references to the triple load. In case you're not sure what they're talking about, some of your old veterans may call it the Baker load.

    Stretch the hose out to full length. Then just flat lay it on the ground where it's in three layers. Hold those three layers together as if it's just one layer and then bed it back. (The hose will resemble a flat S that gets bedded back as another flat S.)

    When you get done, you'll have a loop of hose that lays under your nozzle. Poke that loop through the handle on the nozzle, then when you deploy it you can grab loop & nozzle and just run 1/3 of the total hose length. Pull the loop out and drop it, and when the line is charged the S will un-flatten.

    It is slow to load, but deployment is extra super quick.

    I think another good choice is the double doughnut, where you double the hose over with the nozzle at the truck, then roll from the bend at the middle. It deploys pretty darn quick as well.


  12. #12
    jizumper-5
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Arrow

    Same as Lt Stick...Works very well.

    ------------------
    Keep Safe!

  13. #13
    NozzleHog
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Two sections sit side by side in the bumper tray:
    1st 50' - horseshoe w/ an ear on each side.
    2nd 50' (w/nozzle) - double donut roll.

    Nozzleman grabs the donut roll, goes towards fire dragging the 1st section behind him. When the 1st 50' is stretched, he rolls out the donut roll and is good to go.

    It's easy and quick to deploy, and to re-rack.

  14. #14
    RescueCoFireman
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Does anyone use a booster hose reel anymore? On the pumper we have no pre-connected hose lines, we just pull off however much hose we need. That way we don't have to repack the entire load. Typically for a car fire,or an outside rubbish fire, one length (50') of 1-3/4" line will work fine. The pumper just pulls close to the fire and we draw off of our booster tank. If necessary the Chauffer will hook in a 3-1/2" supply line to a fire plug to keep the booster tank full.

  15. #15
    NozzleHog
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Booster hose, what's that?
    Oh...you mean that garden hose looking stuff? Some of the antique apparatus still has it...see 'em in parades all the time!

  16. #16
    RescueCoFireman
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Nozzle Hog,
    I got the sarcasm, but a booster hose reel isn't a bad thing nor outdated. True it's not common on apparatus today but look at it's benefits: Easy deployment and easy to take up; It's use on fires such as dumpster fires, car fires and washdowns at MVA's is great.

    GB



    [This message has been edited by RescueCoFireman (edited 04-05-2001).]

  17. #17
    flash32
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    Thank you for all of the replies. your suggestions are greatly appreciated.

    RescueCoFireman- I agree with you on your statement about the booster reels for dumpester fires and wash downs at MVAs. Although I may be wrong about that.
    But i do not agree with you about using them for car fires. Something may happen that a booster line may not be able to handle. There was a previous thread on this topic, "What size line to use on a car fire". Can't find it now though.

    ------------------
    Adam J. Dorn

    These are my opinions and not of any group or org. that i belong to.

  18. #18
    Brian Dunlap
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    We use Two 50' Donut Rolls {1 3/4"} inside the bumper compartment --- When we need it we roll out the line -- connect it and hook the nozzle on a little time consuming but we only trash line for dumpster and brush fires -- and some car fires depending on the size of the fire

  19. #19
    Eng522ine
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I'm going to agree with RescueCoFireman on this one. Booster line is suitable for ALMOST anything that doesn't have a foundation. It's tough to beat, no worries about getting kinks in it, no worries about having to flake 100' of hose on the side of a highway, no rolling hose on the side of a highway, no drying and repacking hose ... you get the idea.


    Nozzlehog... Just because something's old doesn't necessarily make it a bad thing. Doesn't necessarily mean its good but, in this case, the old timers had one hell of an idea and it works as well today as it did then. Just like anything else you have to know when it's appropriate to use and when it's not.

    Be Safe & remember the red rubber hose is still handy to have around!!

  20. #20
    fireman_1
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Ok, you hook the hose up to the connection and start it at the bottom and zig-zag it from side to side! Then you hook up the nosel up to the hose and when you pick up the nosel it all comes out in a nice manner! I've done it a million times, and it worked everytime! It's never let me down!

  21. #21
    NozzleHog
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Wow, it sure doesn't take much to get peoples feathers ruffled around here, does it?
    First, my statement about booster lines was meant to be a humorous, sarcastic, facetious, whatever you want to call it reference to the fact that you just don't see them much anymore (or at all, depending on the dept.) I have pulled a few booster lines in my day and didn't make any judgement about their merits or lack thereof, but since you got me started:

    "Booster line is suitable for ALMOST anything that doesn't have a foundation."
    Huh? I can't think of any fire that can't be put out faster and better with an 1 3/4" trash line flowing 150+ GPM as opposed to a booster hose flowing 25 to 50. Autos, trucks, dumpsters, outside rubbish, etc. The faster you put the fire out, the better. It's safer and we get back in service for the next run quicker. The only positive aspect of booster lines I can think of is on natural cover fires...they can be dragged through wooded areas easier. Only problem...I haven't been on a brush fire in two or three years.

    "no worries about getting kinks in it, no worries about having to flake 100' of hose"
    If you can't run a 100 foot 1 1/2" or 1 3/4" hose line on an outside fire without having problems flaking it out and kinks, maybe you should practice more. Preferably before you have to stretch 300' of 2 1/2" into a smoke filled taxpayer basement.

    "...and wash downs at MVAs"
    If your dept. is still washing vehicle fluids into storm drains you're wrong. These empty into streams, creeks, rivers, etc. Spills should be picked up with absorbent material and disposed of properly. Maybe you should ask your state's EPA or DOE.

    How do you sensitive guys survive the firehouse kitchen?

    [This message has been edited by NozzleHog (edited 04-06-2001).]

  22. #22
    dr inferno
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Booster Line and a Vehicle Fire?

    Am I glad I do not work for you.
    Any vehicle fire should be attacked with a minimum 1 and a 1/2 inch hand line and should also have a back line as well. (You can look it up in the IFSTA Essentials Fourth edition page 548 if you want.)As for the old guys having it right I do not think so or we all would still be using leather buckets!!

  23. #23
    PA Volunteer
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We have 50 feet stacked with a handle at the bottom and the second 50 feet donut rolled. Grab the donut roll and the nozzle, stick it under your arm, yank the handle out, walk as far as you need, drop the donut and you're ready to go. Fairly simple to repack also. Got the idea from Kentland ... thanks 33. Stay Safe.

  24. #24
    LHS*
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    http://www.geocities.com/Baja/Trails/7873/Index6.html

    Shows how we load our bumper lines and pull the bumper lines.

  25. #25
    oz10engine
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    What are you using it for? If your using it for trash,dumpsters,and autos who cares how it's packed cause you're really in no hurry to get the line in service. We donut roll the first 50' and flat the other 50' just so if we need only 1 section the coupling is easy to find.

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