1. #1
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    trout run pa
    Posts
    11

    Default LODD-HEART ATTACKS

    I see that there is alot of us dying of heart attacks at emergency calls or just returning from one. Does any one know of any studies being done to see if there are any reasons for these happening other than just stress and/or heart problems? It just seems to me that too many are happening to people to be just related to stress and/or problems. Any insight on this matter.

  2. #2
    Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Monona, WI
    Posts
    77

    Default

    This is what I see myself, and it in no way reflects or substitutes for any study that was or could be done.

    I know several people who work out hard to prepare for a department (ie physical abilities tests). Once they're on, they kind of lax with the workout. This, coupled with standard firehouse "grub", the stress that's simply inherent in the job (its can be hard for an out-of-shape body to handle sudden jumps in adrenaline, in my opinion) and inactivity between calls - it all adds up to a heart-attack (or other health problems) waiting to happen.

    I work part time as a personal trainer. I've worked with a few guys and gals who are firefighters. What I try to do is put them on a program that takes little time - quality over quantity (firefighters can't afford to expend all their energy in working out...you never know when you'll get "the big one"), whether it be basketball, lifting, etc.

    Aerobic activity is equally as important as muscle. You can have the biggest muscles in the world, but if your body doesn't use oxygen efficiently, muscles won't work to their potential. I also offer diet suggestions that they can take to the firehouse.

    Like I said, this is just from my personal experience. No one has to be in prime shape for the Firefighter Challenge to be a good firefighter...but a steady exercise program and smart (notice I didn't say "STRICT") diet is a must. I reccommend to ANYONE "The Firefighter's Workout Book". Many of its contents are nothing new...but the motivation, goal setting suggestion, and the simple explanations of kinesiology kind of put the whole program together.
    We're all in this together. FDNY 9-11-01

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Mornington Peninsula.Victoria.Australia
    Posts
    135

    Default

    I am a voll and work in IT - so my opinion may be way off key, however could this be related to rosters?
    My experience from IT is while working for Telstra I was put on 24 hour call. From Thursday evening to Monday I had 3 hours sleep in between calls. On the Monday I had an appointment at the local blood bank. Didn't feel to bad so went down there. I was rejected (the first time in over 60 donations) My blood pressure etc was 80 over 50 - every other time was 130 over 80.
    Regardless of physical fitness - I am mid forties and reasonably fit - it only takes a few days without sleep to put you into a dangerous category.
    With the financial pressures we all have, could this be affecting those on shift work? Quite often we do not know when to quit or our employers how to treat staff. I sacked from this job 2 weeks later. Perhaps they overheard my comments on return from the blood bank.

    Any firefighter with a second job and domestic and financial problems could end up in the same situation.

    ps not a union member but should be.

    Other variables which could be a contributing factor -
    1. The increasing age of the work force - not only applies to the fire service but is probably affecting the emergency services more now as the labour market is very tight for those in mid-life. Emergency service workers used to take a pension at 20 years and go enter the corporate world with 20 years of working life to go. This is not an option anymore.

    2. Lets get over this thing that fitness will make people imune from cardiac arrest.
    This is not true. It is a taboo to mention that drugs may be a contributing factor but the fire service is not immune. Whether it be amphetamines to enable longer duration - say in the above example or steriods to enhance physical ability it is possible that some of the CJ Hunter type dietary supplements are leaving their mark.
    All major sports have had to deal with this problem. I know several former profesional cycalists from the mid 70s and all that are still alive have had major heart to correct the effects of EPO, the others are all dead.


    [ 07-08-2001: Message edited by: Wombat ]

    [ 07-09-2001: Message edited by: Wombat ]
    Disclaimer
    These views are my own and not of either my brigade or any other organisation.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Gonzo, there is a short article in Fire Engineering this month that talks about a study in which 74 fire fighters (paid) were followed for six years. They found that they had an abnormally high cholesterol level and a higher level of heart disease. The study was published recently in a cardiac journal. My wife is a cardiac nurse and I am trying to get the article.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Gonzo, there is a short article in Fire Engineering this month that talks about a study in which 74 fire fighters (paid) were followed for six years. They found that they had an abnormally high cholesterol level and a higher level of heart disease. The study was published recently in a cardiac journal. My wife is a cardiac nurse and I am trying to get the article.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

  6. #6
    EuroFirefighter.com
    PaulGRIMWOOD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    831

    Default

    "The 'new-wave' uses of water-fog have been proven to reduce the physiological stresses placed upon firefighters, dramatically reducing heart rates, body core temperatures and time spent in the fire compartment".

    Possibly even reducing the number of heart attacks amongst firefighters?
    http://www.firetactics.com/US-NAVY.htm

  7. #7
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Hepburnville, PA
    Posts
    7

    Default

    I agree. There are alot of deaths that are listed as heart related - way to many. I too wonder if there are any studies. We read the LODD list at the end of each monthly meeting we have. The number of heart related deaths are startling. Unfortunately, we need to change the way we do things in order to prevent these kinds of LODD. We must start finding answers now. My department's municipality does not allow an individual to participate in incidents for a period of 5 yrs after a heart/circulatory problem unless the doc is willing to give a clean bill of health before. I do not know of any doc that will put themselves on the line and do that.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    hctrouble25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Posts
    356

    Default

    J. Wade Womack of Texas A&M did the study on fire fighters and how the lack of exercise we do contributes to the heart attack rate. The study is very interesting. I have always said that it amazes me that we are required by OSHA to wear certain gear to protect our lives, but that no one makes us stay in shape to protect our hearts, and to keep us living healthy. I know many fire fighters who have chronic lung problems and who smoke and all of this contributes to the heart attack rate as well. I am not saying you shouldn't smoke - hell I did for 12 years and just quit at the beginning of this year - but certainly some healthy things like having gyms in the department, cooking healthier meals, etc. would help. I have started a fitness program along with quitting smoking and I have never felt better. I find that I can work longer, and do more at the fire scene without putting so much strain on my heart and my body. My air lasts longer, I am capable of doing more lifting, and I don't worry about the EMTs checking me out after I come out of the fire anymore. I used to hide from them cause my pulse and bp would be so crazy.
    Never forget those who went before and sacrified to make us better and stronger as a fire service and a nation. 09-11-01 forever etched in time and our memories. God Speed Boys!

  9. #9
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    trout run pa
    Posts
    11

    Default

    What I'm getting at is there something some where either in the smoke or air bottles we use that is contributing to heart attacks that the docs are missing. I read one or twoLODD's and they said Large Heart as the cause of death???

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register