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  1. #1
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    Default When fire hits home

    Does anyone have a rule or policy about firefighters responding to their own residence. The story in OH has brought up this topic, I can't help but wonder if the accident wasn't directly related to that FF's personal involvement in the incident. While I have empathy for this ff's situation and loss I feel that he shouldn't have been alowed on the rig.


  2. #2
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    They won't allow a doctor to operate on their own family for the same reasons. This guy should not have been DRIVING the truck. And once on scene, don't you think he's more likely to do something he shouldn't. It puts everyone else in jeopardy if they end up having to go in after him too.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Dalmatian90's Avatar
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    If it is your own property, Fire Marshal will ask (um, order) that you be taken off the fireground "behind the yellow tape" like any other property owner.
    IACOJ Canine Officer
    20/50

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber Engine58's Avatar
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    Yea our rules here are you cant respond to family members or your house if anything goes wrong. You may go there yourself but other than that you cant do anything just stand there like a normal civilian. Also with EMS your not allowed either...you may meet the rig on scene but if your at the building and the alarm goes in for your house or a family members you DO NOT step on that ambulance..IF the need be you may ride the rig to the house but your not allowed to do anything once we get there...and you sit up front on the way to the hospital just like any other family member would if they wished to ride in the ambulance.
    Andrew
    Firefighter/EMT
    New Jersey

  5. #5
    Member axman51's Avatar
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    Some Departments don't have any choice but to send there members to a call at there house of on a call that that involves a family member, I have done both, I responded to an electrical fire at my house that turned out to be a small fire, I also responded to my wife's grandmother having a major MI, I had the highest medical training so I had to choice but to do my job, it was the hardest call that I have ever had but she is still here today to thank me so If I would do it again if put in the same situation, I would rather do what I am trained to do than to sit and wonder if I did everything in my power to help my loved one in later years.
    "I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a fireman. The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we know the work which a fireman has to do believe that his is a noble calling."

    Edward F. Croker
    Chief 1899-1911
    Fire Dept. City of New York

  6. #6
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    All I would like to say is that the fire service was started to protect peoples homes, your own included. The whole reason bucket brigades began. If it is my home I am going to go.

  7. #7
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    Hard Question

    Yes we want to save our own home in the event of a fire, but this is where it gets hard. The year is 2001 and the insurance companys got burt to many times and will
    DO ANYTHING not to pay off a claim. If there is any dout about what started the fire they allways look at the home owner first. Now add a monkey wrench to the claim he is a firefighter who knows how and where to start a fire. cover up evidence, know's what the fire marshal will look for and not just what started the fire, but evidence of insurance fraud, like making sure your family and pets are not home at time of fire, The removeal of some personel items like photo's that insurance company can not replace, ect...

    Also he can slow down the Department resonse time by preplaning a few tricks like draining the air from the breaks in the fire trucks. By the time you figer that one out, if you Ever do, It repairs it's self. This is an old trick on drivers. Because they never look at guages when they start the truck, just get in an drive. but when it don't move they think the breaks are stuck or frozen so they pump the breaks or turn parking break on and off trying to free then but just wasting air instead.

    And if he makes a mistake on fire sceen and we all do, did he do that because he is human or did he want the house to burn down?

    Most of our firemen in our vol FD live in home's that cost anywhere from 125K to 500K and thats a lot of coin for the Insurance company to pay out, and if they think in anyway they can blame someone else they will and only pay 50 cents on the dollar...

    Just remember smoke detectors save lives...

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber NCRSQ751's Avatar
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    We had one of our firefighters houses burn down this year. He was at work at the time, but responded home for the blaze.

    I think excluding him would have not only left us short manpower, but it would have left him with the feeling that he may have been able to do something, make a difference.

    You have officers to monitor behavior. If anyone does something stupid or out of line, regardless of the circumstance they'd be taken out of the action.

    Why is this any different?

    Like Axman said, some departments can't afford to lose even one FF, especially during the day. We are definately one of those departments.

    He had no problems with his insurance by the way. He and his family are happily in their new home.
    Susan Lounsbury
    Winston-Salem Rescue Squad
    Griffith Volunteer FD

  9. #9
    Member Will24's Avatar
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    Our chief lost his house to a fully involved structure fire in 95 or 96, you bet your *** he helped on the scene
    There are three truths in life:

    1. Jews do not recognize Jesus as the Messiah.
    2. Protestants do not recognize the Pope as the leader of the Christian faith.
    3. Two Baptists do not recognize each other in the liquor store.

  10. #10
    OLE
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    I would like to think that it would be a benifit for the owner be a firefighter because who else would know every inch of space in their home??? But the other part tells me that they should stay away for insurance purposes...... I just may have to speak to my insurance agent....a fellow brother on the same department... I'll keep ya all posted.

  11. #11
    Forum Member LACAPT's Avatar
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    My house on fire! Damn straight I'm gonna be there

  12. #12
    Forum Member Trkco1's Avatar
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    An article in our local paper


    Judge chastises ex-volunteer fire chief for leaving crash scene

    Published in the Asbury Park Press
    THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    DEMAREST -- A former Dumont volunteer fire chief was "a jerk" for leaving the scene of an accident that injured a borough teen-ager, a judge said.

    James Molinaro was found guilty Tuesday in Demarest Municipal Court of reckless driving and leaving the scene of an accident.

    "I think you were a jerk," Judge Richard Donohue said. "I think you should get everything I could give you. If I could give you more, I would."

    The judge revoked Molinaro's driver's license for six months and fined him $600.

    Molinaro raced home on June 4 after hearing an incorrect report that his apartment was on fire. He was driving a Public Service Electric & Gas truck. Molinaro is a mechanic for PSE&G.

    He drove on the wrong side of the street, passing a line of cars stopped at a red light, then swerved to miss a turning car and drove onto a sidewalk, knocking down a bus stop sign that struck a teen-ager, police said.

    He got out of the car and asked if everyone was all right, then said he had to leave the scene because his house was on fire.

    When Molinaro realized it was not his apartment that was ablaze, he began screaming and cursing, a police officer testified.

    Molinaro declined comment after Tuesday's hearing
    FTM-PTB-EGH-RFB-KTF

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