1. #1
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    Angry Rescues? Walk-in or Walk-around

    Our department is replacing our current rescue, an 84 chev 1 ton cube with single rear wheels, 8500 GVW. We are looking at a number of options. A 16 ft Grumman Kurbmaster with duals and 12000gvw. Or a heavy rescue. We run a fair # of MVA's here, and more field/brush fire than structural. We have looked on some of the used equpment sites, but most custom trucks don't look to me like they would off road well. Another option is to get a rescue body built to put on our 71 thibeault T-60 Chev. (17000mi, no rust, solid cab & chassis, pump next to toast). Thought we wanted a walk-in body, but I was wondering about a walk-around with a six seat crew area. Any input would be appreciated. We are a volunteer rural dept with 30 members in two stations protecting 2000 pop. over 500 sq mi. Only Station One runs MVA and Rescue. Station Two is fire only. So pros, cons, your experiences and input would be greatly appreciated.
    This is of course only my humble opinion, but then again, its likely the only one that matters.

  2. #2
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    Take a look at Kentland, Maryland (Station 33) Eng/Rescue 333. Very functional piece of equipment.


    WWW.Kentland33.com

  3. #3
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    We run a 97' International 4800 4x4 with a five person cab and BME body. It has full extrication, water rescue, ect., 350gpm rearmount pump, 500 gallons of water and a 40 gallon class A foam tank. It handles car fires very well and the 4x4 and pump and roll capabilities make it a pretty good brush rig.

  4. #4
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    Go to this wesite: http://youngstownfiredept.8m.com and check out Squad 33. It is set to be replaced here in the next 3 months. It might work for what you are looking for and the department would probably rather sell it to another department as opposed to either a dealer or scrap yard.

  5. #5
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    Smash, the old question of what to spec? It kind of gets the old answer of what are you going to do with it? First thing a heavy rescue is a type of rescue, its not called heavy just because it has a high axle weight rating. Heavy rescue is something like what FDNY, Baltimore, Philly, and Chicago run. I know there are alot of others that say they have true "heavy rescues", but usually they are just enormous rigs with a ton of equipment on them. Research some ideas...
    Question 1: Is this rescue simply for MVA/extrications?

    Look at a rescue pumper if it is. You get the benefit of a charged hoseline while you are cutting on a vehicle which has the potential to catch fire. Plus it would be less staffing to put eveyone into 1 truck instead of 2 or 3.

    I like the walk around. You tend to get bigger compartments on a smaller truck. Look at a Ford f-550 crew cab with a custom built walkaround rescue body. It maybe too small for you, but its worth a look, prices will be way reduced.

    If you feel you need the command post (as so many poor souls do) you may want to look at the walk-in, I don't have anything against them, if you build them right and keep all the "stuff" in its appropriate compartment. Plus in alot of walk-ins there is alot more room for people to ride/sit. Also excellent for re-hab!!!!

    I've been lucky enough to have speced out a few trucks, if you need any more info/tips send me an e-mail...

    By the way, good luck, in the end, when its in the station, you will love whatever it is!!!

  6. #6
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    Okay. We run our rescue on all calls. Both pumpers and our tanker have alleged 3 man cabs (If you're in streets). Pumper 3 is set up for vehicle ex and fire suppression. Pumper 2 is set up for structural calls. Rescue (squad?) carries extrication equipment that wont fit in compartments of #3, res q saw, 5kw generator, smoke ejectors, shovels rakes brooms etc for wildland and seats 6 hauls as many as get there on time. Rolls on all calls. It transports members from place to place at field and brush fires as well as scouting for where to attack next. So whatever we get needs a certain amount of off road capability. I have been playing this game for 18 years now and have now made Deputy Chief. I have a solid handle on what is required for pumpers but this rescue has me going in circles. Overloading scares me but I am not sure that I can justify a 3 - 5 ton chassis rescue. On the other hand I am not sure that a 12000 lb gvw van will be large enough and I don't like the fact that there are personel riding with equipment (no matter how well secured) in something that would crush like a can if it went over. Thanks for the input so far and I will work with it. This rural firefighting thing sure can raise some interesting challenges and compromises.
    This is of course only my humble opinion, but then again, its likely the only one that matters.

  7. #7
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    Thumbs up

    Another thing to consider is how much equipment you plan on carrying on this vehicle. From what I've seen your looking for something not only for Vehicle accidents but, a support vehicle for other types of calls. A International or Freightliner crew cab may be the way for you. If your buying new start working on specs. If you are looking for used then start scouring the web sites. As for the 1971 you could send it out and either get the pump redune and make it into a Rescue Pumper. I'm not sure if its worth it or not to have the pump redune and a new body put on it. It also depends on what your Department wants to spend for this unit.

  8. #8
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    For many reasons, get the walkaround.
    1. Bigger and deeper compartments that fit longer, bulkier items.
    2. Safety-with the crew cab, everybody can sit facing forward and together. With a walk in, you don't even know if he got in, unless it is open to the cab (more $) Too many guys, self included, stand up in the back and try to look out the window at what's ahead.
    3. We bought 2 20 foot walk-ins 12 years ago. The kept saying the walk-in was great as a command post or rehab area in bad weather. We have NEVER used them that way. They are 3 times as big as they need to be for what we do-mva's and air bottles. A 4dr F350 with a utility body could do it, ala "Squad 51"

  9. #9
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    Why limmit yourself to the F-350? Ford makes the Super Duty: F-450SD, F-550SD, F-650SD & F-750SD. All of these are aviable with "Regular, Super or Crew cab configurations. 2 or 4 wheel drive.
    NO, I'm NOT a Ford salesman, but DO own several Super Duties, & as a DIE-HARD Chevy man, I must admit that the Ford SD's DO kick *ss!!!
    There are several service-body mnf.'s who offer bodies that can be teamed up with a H.D. cab/chassie. Look at Knapphide Manufacturing Co.(Quincy, IL) I know they built a special Rescue body for their local F.D. a few years ago.
    Think "outside the box", especally if your $$$'s are limited.19-2002: Message edited by: DenverFarmboy ]

    [ 01-19-2002: Message edited by: DenverFarmboy ]


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