1. #1
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default plastic cribbing use

    Who is using plastic cribbing? What is working best for you? Ever had a piece fail?

  2. #2
    BatCom401
    Firehouse.com Guest

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    We are using it in Southlake, Texas. Just purchased "turtle plastic" cribbing and loaded it on the engines. Haven't had an opportunity to use it yet but it appears to be a solid product.

    Ricky Black

  3. #3
    pvfd56L7
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    We have used it for the past couple of years in Pleasant Valley, NY. We have 8 of the turtle-plastic step chocks and use them quite frequently. The only slight problem we have had is that they tend to slide on the pavement when it's raining, so you have to be sure that you've got a good placement and they're secure.

  4. #4
    RSQ6MAN
    Firehouse.com Guest

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    Sirs, Last year our department needed to up date our cribbing on our rescues and other equipment. A Captain friend of mine and myself conducted some tests using both types wood and plastic type. I have always used wood style cribbibg in the past (18 years). and have yet to have a failure when using it. The department wanted to purchase some that was already made and of course lighter.
    We went to our training center and placed cars in diffrent positions,roll over,on side,on wheels etc. We placed chocks of both types in the usual places needed and both faired well, but wood had a bite advantage.
    In wedges, wood also had a better out come.
    In the building of cribbing boxes both were strong and without failure.
    We found the advantages were that due to the natural properties of wood that it had an advantage in the fact the it will bite and not slip on each other, it could be cut in sizes to fit the needs of the scene without costing 4x as much to replace. The wood chocks did not slip on the asphalt and stayed in place during extrications without needing as much adjusting during the extrication. It was cut to fit the compartments sizes of each unit within a standard length of 18-22 inches. A replacement stock pile was also made to replace lost, left,and contaminated or damaged peices. Leaving the peices behind on a scene to keep it stable or unretrievable items is not a cost factor due to the inital cost. Again these were our findings and they fit our needs and budget. Like it or not everyone has a budget ours is over 40 million a year and we still have to "fit the budget".
    Wood has a better bite and works well with other materials. We did buy plastic step chocks due to the weight factor only and realized it will slip!
    During the usage class we went over the advantages and compairson with the diffrent Fire companies and most seemed to like the wood better. Well thats my 2 cents if you need more info e-mail me at the address given.

    RSQ6MAN

    [This message has been edited by RSQ6MAN (edited 02-01-99).]

  5. #5
    RoadwayRescue
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    I would like to add a couple of items of note. My dept. has been using plastic chocks, lock blocks & cribs for 3 years now. Both materials, wood & plastic, have inherent advantages & disadvanges. Both CAN slip. Both can fail under certain conditions. They are like any other tool- you must know the tool you are working with and use it to your advantage.
    Having used both materials, I prefer plastic chocks for a number of reasons. Weight is one. The ability to intigrate tire deflation tools into the chock is another. Durability far exceeds wood. And most of all, I feel that vehicles stabilized on them stay "locked" in place better due to the fact they sit in a "pocket" on the step (notice on plastic chocks the step is lower than the front of it) If they get oil or gas on them, hose'm off and they're ready to go. And in all honesty, I've yet to have one slip where a wood wouldn't have. As to box cribbing, I think that wood is better. Plastic on plastic is inherently slick, let alone put it under a load that might shift. Lock blocks on the other hand can be excellent in certain instances. They make a solid column that is very strong. That my thought for now!

  6. #6
    RoadwayRescue
    Firehouse.com Guest

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    Since we are on the topic of plastic cribbing, I'd like to tell you all about a "new" version of an old item that has recently appeared on the market. Res-Q-Tech (Code3) has developed a plastic chock called a "Rapid Stair". I saw these in use in the UK this past Aug. when I judged their national competition and had the opportunity to use them with out team in Rockford this past year. Basically it is a two part crib, the base much like a standard step chock except the "steps" of the chock is replaced by an incline plane w/very small steps in it. The second part is a "wedge" with an opposing angle to match that of the base, also with very small steps built into it. The wedge however is pretty wide (8"x8"I believe) and has a long line attached to it in a loop. It works the same as a step chock for placement however it works by pulling the wedge line, making the wedge slide up the base wedgeing in tight between the base and vehicle. The wedge & base stay locked together during the sliding movement due to the small steps built into both. Using tire deflation & these chocks, we found that vehicle stayed more solid on the cribbing than normal chocks, eliminated wedges and actually increased contact with vehicle and the roadway due to the base & wedge surface being larger. We did notice drawbacks with them. The higher you went on the base with the wedge, the wedge tended to wobble. And they were harder to remove afterward since they "locked" in much tighter than normal chocks.
    Just some thoughts to share!

  7. #7
    ccc530
    Firehouse.com Guest

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    We had purchased some plastic step chocks. We found that they slipped during training and were very undependable. We immediatly went back to our tried and true wood.

  8. #8
    rshaw
    Firehouse.com Guest

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    While resently working on a project in Dallas, I tried the plastic step blocks, these worked fine. The plastic cribbing on the other hand was slick, I think that the natural give of wood has the effect to bite into each other adding to the stability.

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