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  1. #1
    the rookie
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default Does the windshield or side windows really have to be removed?

    Why does the windshield of a car have to be removed. Does it stop the rescuer from doing a better job if left in place? Also, why break the side windows if it makes such a mess? Thanks to all who respond.


  2. #2
    e33
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    The windshield really only needs to be removed if you are taking a roof or pushing the dash up, or if it is in such shambles that it is safer to remove whats left of it. Any other windows should really come out if you are doing extrication. The stress that is put on the car can cause windows to shatter violently and send glass flying an extraordinary distance. Safer to get rid of all of it prior to any operations and aftet the patient has been protected.

  3. #3
    mfgentili
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    Excellant answer e33. It is always much better to control broken glass than to have it shatter unexpectedly on victims and rescuers. It also gives rescuers other entry points in which to assist such as applying c-spine traction, controlling bleeding etc.

    ------------------
    mfg

  4. #4
    the rookie
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    If possible, can the door windows be rolled down into the door instead of breaking them?

  5. #5
    e33
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    YES! In fact, you should try to do this whenever possible, saves alot of mess and flying glass.

  6. #6
    DD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    We used to try to tape tempered glass prior to breaking it. It worked fairly well when the glass was clean and dry, which was not very often. We have gotten away from the tape and now always try to roll down a side window. The main thing is to cover the people (firefighters too) in the car to protect them before breaking the glass. Many moons ago,when the 3/4 boots were in use,we had to be sure that they were pulled up or else we had a boot full of glass fragments.
    You only did that once!

  7. #7
    FireDan
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    Plain and simple....if you are going to do a rescue where you will be exerting forces on the body of the vehicle in an effort to make space for your victims or to enhance rescue efforts, by all means, remove the tempered glass. Depending on the nature of the rescue and the level of damage, removal of the windshield may or may not be a necessity.

  8. #8
    SBrooks
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    Woke up this morning to respond to a MVA on on the capital beltway. Driver's side impact, driver in driver's seat, injured, on all fours. Removed roof, 2 doors, and b-posts. As I recall the at least one of the doors were removed with the glass still in. My guess was that the guy assigned to take care of glass was still cutting across the lower 1/3 of the windshield, and the guy on the preconnected cutter simply cut the hinges w/o impacting the window area. I was busy setting up the simo pumps and only saw the door (and glass) later. seemed to work, as the glass was still intact. generally we like to roll down the window and let it break in the door when we performe the vertical crush. We almost never remove the windshield, but cut a line as low as we can across, near the dash, with a short upturn near the a-post, leaving some post to be pushed by the rams, if necessary. Windshield goes away with the roof. usually can get the roof off very nearly as fast as removing (and cleaning) the whole windshield.

  9. #9
    nbfd131
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    I agree with most of what has been said here. If you are not extricating and just removing patients, then you don't usually need to remove any windows. If extrication is being done. Either remove or roll down completely any window on the side you are working on. If you are going to break a window, try duct tape running across it in a checker board pattern. Works great for controling glass pellets from flying all over the place. Most of the time, if done right, the vast majority will come all together. Leave a couple of tape handles for you to grab onto and off you go. Try it sometime during training.

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