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  1. #1
    DD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post Plastic cribbing

    Please post your experience with plastic cribbing. Is it worth the cost? I am especially interested in the interlocking design of some that I have seen.

    We have always used rough sawn hardwood. It is heavy, but very strong,readly available, and free or at very low cost.



  2. #2
    NVFD933
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question

    SAME HERE WE HAVE ONLY USED HARD WOOD. I AM CURIOUS TO SEE WHAT IS SAID ABOUT THE PLASTIC.

  3. #3
    firelouie
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    The plastic cribbing slips easily and the interlocking segments do not help. I have no idea what brand we use.

  4. #4
    skip rupert61
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I have used the plastic cribbing in a training environment only. It did rain during playtime and like the earlier post, we found it to very slippery. The department that used it liked it very much. They had about $800 worth (brand unknown to me). I didnt care too much for it. I'll stick to my wood for now.

  5. #5
    AJM108
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    In my department we have both wood and plastic the plastic step chocks work well but the wedges slip sometimes as for flat stock I feel that nothing beats a good old 2x4 or 4x4 that you know won't slip.

    ------------------
    AJM108



  6. #6
    Lt JACK JASPERSON
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    plastic cribbing works well if conditions are dry. watch out tough, this stuff has a mind of it's own when it gets wet. my advise is, keep the wood and buy a small amount of the plastic and train with it. you may like it. don't throw away the wood before you're sure you like the plastic.

    ------------------
    Lt Jack R Jasperson

  7. #7
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I've used plastic cribbig requently during trng. When wet or soied, it does become slippry. Most manufacturers are addin some type of slip resistant material to their pieces. That helps some, although not eliinating the problem. Stepchocks work well, wedges work relatively well when placed correctly, and the tensioned buttress works well. The brand I've used most is made by TURTLE PLASTICS and is advertised to be almost twice as strong as wood. The lock blocks interface with each other well, however to surface conatcting the load will become slippery if not managed well. Plastic cribbing cleans easily, is durable, and somewhat lighter weight. Expense is obviously higher than wood.

  8. #8
    Captain Hickman
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Can't say how well plastic cribbing works, have never had a chance to work with it. But I do know I like working with the good Old Pine. Unpainted, rough, soft wood that stays where you put it. Drop a sharp edge of metal on it, it's as good as being a piece of the vehicle, it don't move. We have a lot of hardwood in our area, but the pine works best. It's cheep, bio-degradable, it's plentiful, and it works best for us. Just a thought..

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