1. #1
    fire/emt-9-B
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Heavy Machinery Extrication

    I am looking for information, or resources to help me on a project I am working on for my fire department. I need info. on extrication on heavy machinery i.e. printing presses, assembly line machinery, etc.
    This is refering to extricating a victim who has become lodged in or partially lodged in this equiptment. If you all have any info at all or know of any books, pamphlets, or articles, please let me know. Or if your department has protocols on this type of incident I would appreciate it. thank you all.



    ------------------
    Rhett Fleitz
    Local 1132
    Roanoke City Fire-EMS

  2. #2
    MetalMedic
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    Check around your district where this equipment is in use. Find out who makes them and see if you can get an address or phone number of those companies. Also talk to those who repair the machines, both in-house and from outside sources. If these folks can't put you in touch with some leads, you should at least be able to get some technical manuals in your hands which would be a decent start on your project.

    Good Luck!

    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

  3. #3
    fire/emt-9-B
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Thank you for the info. I am looking into these resources. Keep up the good work.


    ------------------
    Rhett Fleitz
    Local 1132
    Roanoke City Fire-EMS

  4. #4
    MetalMedic
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    Your project has my interest. Might do the same here someday. We had a man trappend in a 10K pound press that was a challenge. Unfortunately it was a fatality, but it got me thinking of some training. At the very least, you might want to arrange a tour of your heavy industries just to get your staff familiar with where this stuff is at. Knowing where the press is at and where the best place is to position apparatus to keep us from carrying equipment a long distance. That right there is some improvement.

    Good luck!

    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.


    [This message has been edited by MetalMedic (edited February 23, 2000).]

  5. #5
    fire/emt-9-B
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    You're right MetalMedic. Most departments open their eyes after an incident or two resulting in fatalities or not. Knowledge in this event is gained by experience. There definately is no way of preparing for any of these incidents other than having the man power, tools, and resources available to you and knowing what they are. So I guess what I am looking for is specific info. on incidents, so we can learn from others disasters and give us a path to follow.
    Please keep in touch!

    ------------------
    Rhett Fleitz
    Local 1132
    Roanoke City Fire-EMS

  6. #6
    MM187
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    I must agree with MetalMedic on this one.
    If you are not familiar with the equipment, go straight to the source. Manufacturers and repair personnel are usually very cooperative. Also the facility which has the equipment is also a very good source of info, many are more than happy to give fire/rescue personnel tours of their operations. It is difficult,if not impossible, to get this type of machinery for training, so experienced operators and manufacturers are your most easily accessible resource.

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  7. #7
    rjnaab1303
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I am president of a group of instructors called, Specialists Code 3, Ltd. We have presented a number of programs evolving around farm equipment rescue. Many of the mechanisms used in farm extrication are used in other industries.

    You may want to contact the National Farm Medicine Center at Marshfield Clinic, 1000 North Oak Ave. Marshfield, WI 54449-5777
    ATTN: Nadine Pukie
    Ask her to send you one of our manuals that we have written and distributed at the seminars sponsored by them. There may be some helpful information for you to use.

    My experience has shown you must be able to think on your feet. Attempt to get a hold of a serviceman. The other things that have worked are air bags, Good set of hand tools, cribbing and ingenuity.

    Good luck.

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