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  1. #1
    Firefrog
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post Rapid Intervention

    This topic may have been done to death, but I'm interested to hear some opinions. My volunteer fire service may soon be supplied with a small hydraulic pump and a combination spreader/cutter for rapid intervention (light rescue) does any one have a favourite tool. Please explain why you like it.


  2. #2
    Kevin Romer
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    A 30" ram w/ extensions or a telescoping ram in the 40" range.

    Since you will already have a cutter and a spreader, not seperate of course. The ram will allow more capability.

    Easy choice!

    KBR

    ------------------
    "Performance IS Everything"

  3. #3
    HYTHE FIRE DEPARTMENT
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We recently purchased a Holmatro CT 3150 combo tool and a Model 2035 PVU pump. http://www.holmatro.com/ We are quite happy with our purchase. It did take some time to get used to the different style of cutting with this tool. But know that we have practiced with it, we are able to do what we want.

    We had looked at a combi tool from Hurst, Lukas and Holmatro. We compared the specs and performance, and decided that the differences for end result where negligable. What I mean is that all three tools work in a different way, but the end result was we could pop doors and make cuts with all three tools.

    Thus, our decision came down to other factors. First, the fire department in the next town provides mutual aide to us and vice versa. They have had Holmatro for over ten years. Thus, on mutual aid calls, we would be familiar with their tools, and vice versa.

    Second, we haven't seen a Hurst or Lukas dealer in our part of the world (northern Alberta Canada) for years. The Holmatro dealer has tools in 95 % of the departments in our area, thus he is up in our area all of the time. This level of service was important to us, as we are 300 miles from the nearest major city (Edmonton).

    So what I am saying is, it really didn't matter what brand of tool we had, as long as we could get top quality service and make our mutual aid calls more stream lined.



    [This message has been edited by HYTHE FIRE DEPARTMENT (edited November 08, 2000).]

  4. #4
    SCCARESCUE
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We use a Hurst Maverick Tool. It is OK for LIGHT work. As someone said earlier, most of the tools are close in manufacture. The real key here, if this is the only tool you have, is that you recognize 2 things: first, that the tool is limited in its performance delivery. Having a "slightly smaller tool" will not give you "slightly reduced performance" - it may give you a significant reduction in performance.

    Secondly, you need to understand the need for excellent extrication training. A small tool in the hands of someone who uses it occasionally, is a small benefit. A small tool in the hands of someone who understands extrication and cars, can be a significant asset!

    Remember, its not the size of the tool, but how you use it!


    ------------------
    Dan Martelle

  5. #5
    Carl Avery
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    Power Hawk is one worht considering for an RIT tool crib. Light Weight, self contained, cutter and spreader. I will agree any tool in this range is a compromise and as such you do loose something along the way. As for why I suggest you look at the Power Hawk, Battery Power. and the associated ability to work in a depleted atmosphere. I am just saying check it out! I haven't actually used on in this situation so I cannot say from experience. Hope this helps some

    ------------------
    Carl D. Avery

  6. #6
    larescue
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Smile

    The Hurst EK-Combo tool is a 24-volt battery operated, self-contained rescue tool. The battery, motor, pump and reservoir are all built into the tool. It has an 18,000 pound spread force and 60,700 pound cut capability. This tool is ideal for Rapid Intervention Teams allowing immediate response without the need for dragging hoses or wires.

    The Hurst EK-Combo tool is perfect for confined space and trench operations, building collapse incidents, and auto extrications, as well as breaking and breaching into buildings.

  7. #7
    pokeyfd12
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post


    Firefrog and anybody else,

    If I may ask, do you have an SOP that says you have to have extrication equipment, specifically spreaders/cutters and the like to operate as a RIT team?????????

    This is becoming a VERY heated topic in my area and since you are looking for tools to supply your RIT team, I was wondering if this is more a "nice to have" item or if it's mandatory for RIT teams.

    From my experiences as being a FAST or RIT team leader, extrication equipment has been the last thing on my mind when a mayday call comes. I am fortunate to respond with a fully loaded rescue truck when called for FAST or RIT, and the tools are always there, along with torches, airbags and all kinds of other toys, but is all that stuff a necessity also????

    Just curious what all of you think.

    Peace and stay safe.

    Rescue Lt. Kevin C. (aka Pokey)



  8. #8
    Carl Avery
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    POKEY, Admittedly I do not have your experience but I do have lots of contacts in the Rescue tool business and they almost all to a company have tools they recomend for the Tool Crib of an RIT or FAST team, YOU yourself state that you respond with a fully equiped Rescue Truck, which means you have the available resources, when and if you are faced with that situation. Pokey I put to you, If you had the financial resources to have a Set of Spreaders/cutters in your crib you would not do it? Now if it was a toss up between that and a Thermal imager I could see an argument. But why not have the Maximum Resources Available if YOU have to put your RIT/FAST group into action?

    ------------------
    Carl D. Avery

  9. #9
    pokeyfd12
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Carl,

    Without a doubt, if I had the resources and the funding available to purchase a combi-set for my tool cache, I wouldn't hesitate. Like you said, if I had to make a choice between a TIC or something of more importance, that would be a difficult decision.

    I am a big kid. Give me toys, lots of toys, I'll make space for them on the truck, after I learned every possible use for them and trained with them of course. Resources are VERY important and in this business of firefighting you can never have enough. However, if you don't have the training to back up those toys, they are useless. Sometimes, I think we can have too many toys. How many is too many??? I couldn't even begin to guess but I would have to imagine that if your RIT team has more tools set up than you have firefighters to use them, you have too many.

    Sorry, I'm rambling.

    I still hold the question, is this a nice to have piece of equipment for RIT teams or a need to have. I guess it would depend on the reason you are being called for RIT response. If called for standing by at a structure fire, it's probably not an immediate necessity but if standing by at a building collapse with possible rescue in progress, I would have to say it's the first thing that comes off for RIT action.

    Firefrog, I apologize, I think I monopolized your subject thread. To give you an answer Firefrog, the Hurst EK-Combo or the PowerHawk are good for medium duty work and are small enough for RIT teams (one person carry and use). Some small combo tools are even capable of underwater use if that is a consideration on your purchase.

    Peace and stay safe brothers

    Rescue Lt. Kevin C. (aka Pokey)


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