1. #1
    MetalMedic
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation Break that Glass!

    Since I made a fool out of myself, it is a good time to gently remind you all about breaking glass before you use the tools. We had a simple door-pop to do. The patient was in good shape, just couldn't open the driver's door and we didn't want to move him across the center console.

    We had access to the window crank, so rather than break the glass and make all the mess, I decided to roll the glass down into the door. I was anticipating either the door would open before the glass became an issue, or the glass would just break and be caught inside the door.

    Ok, so I let someone else run the tools and he had some troubles with pealing metal (GEO Metro)... and, you guessed it, i happened to be right above the window channel when the door glass broke (wish considerable force and noise). Fortunately, I was fully geared and was unharmed... but I certainly felt rather stupid standing there kicking myself for not doing something I always teach others to do.

    Anyway, the point is, don't take things for granted, nothing is "routine" and do what you can to prevent such things before you start.

    Stay safe!

    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

  2. #2
    Carl Avery
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    Rich, It is always the simple ones that bite you in the A_ _ or something like that. I am one of the guys that goes for the Controled removal of all the Tempered glass when doing a tool job, I Know some disagree, but I have also seen Jobs where the Energy input from Spreaders and such will cause a torsioning of the car and POPING the windows, When you least expect it. Now having said that,if you run across some of the cars on the Road today with Laminated Side Windows, you can disregard total glass removal. I am sure we all know how easy it is to roll the window down and Break the Glass inside the Door, If not lets hear it and we can discuss that

    ------------------
    Carl D. Avery

  3. #3
    MetalMedic
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Wink

    I am in your ball park Carl... I teach controlled breaking of glass for the very reason I got myself covered in glass! Fortunately, I did have enough sense to cover the patient before we started, so he didn't get to see my performance.

    Now, to add even more insult to this... once we got back to the station, I noticed that the little trash basket on the squad was over flowing. So, being a good Boy Scout, I proceeded to ATTEMPT to remove the trash bag. Well... thie darn thing was WAY over stuffed, so this little evolution resulted in the contents of the bag launching throughout the squad and all over me. So, after making a speach to make a sailor blush and being told by my Captain that I was in need of some narcotic... I think it was just a bad day to be me.



    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

  4. #4
    mike m
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Originally posted by mike m:
    i have taught alot of extrication cources and cut alot of victims out of wrecks and the same question always comes up do we or dont we take the glass.my response has always been yes.just as murphys law applied to ricks case,it justs has to be done .i am not saying that all the glass has to be taken,just enough glass to gain access to the patient and whatever glass that is going to have a direct effect on the removal of the victim. also ever try to use duct tape on a cold and rainy night,it just does not work,what i like to use is to cover the patient with a piece of salvage plastic over the passenger compartment,i find using a blanket only the glass shards usually get imbedded in the fabric and that creates a hazard for us.


  5. #5
    Carl Avery
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I humbly disagree with partial removal of tempered glass. Of course this depends on your size up and what is happening, but When a heavy tool Job comes up, torsional Stresses imput into the Car and may result in sudden and unexpected Explosion of the tempered side glass (Remember this does not happen to the new Laminated side Windows on Some cars). All in All, I say, When doing a BIG TOOL Job take all the Tempered glass in a controled fashion , or it might just come back to bite you!

    ------------------
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

  6. #6
    hef8
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question

    Carl, reading this topic got me wondering. Now this might sound strange, but is the a spray, maybe some sort of adhesive that you can apply to the windows that is quick setting, instead of taping windows?

  7. #7
    86Rescuetech
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    As long as we learn from everything we do, we'll do better the next time. We all have made choices some see as wrong. As long as no one got hurt this time. We do vertical lifts with patients, so we take all glass out! Simple and complete. We access an area for the medic to do patient assessment and then cover both of them. We use the glassmaster and punches to take it out. Also remember, they are putting safety glass in side and rear windows now. Be safe.

  8. #8
    Carl Avery
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Originally posted by 86Rescuetech:
    Also remember, they are putting safety glass in side and rear windows now. Be safe.
    86, may I clarify your above quote. I believe you are refering to the Laminated Side Safety Glass, commonly refered to as EPG or Enhanced Protective Glass. Let me say this from the Experiments that Ron Shaw, Ron Moore, Tom Wehr (the Glasmaster man) and myself conducted in Massaschuettes Last spring, We do not have to worry as much about this product. Unlike the Tempered Side Safety that is common in most vehicles, the EPG will NOT shatter with the Explosive force. 86 Hope I did not step on your toes with my added comments

    ------------------
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

    [This message has been edited by Carl Avery (edited 12-26-2000).]

  9. #9
    86Rescuetech
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Carl, thanks for the clarification. My mind was working faster than my hands. I wasn't referring to the explosion of the glass, just that it was out there in some vehicles. Any information is good information. Thanks again.

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