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  1. #1
    rsqguru
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post Front Wheel Drive Extrication

    Over the past fifteen years, I have heard and been taught in rescue schools (Georgia Extrication School for example), that we never pull a front wheel drive steering column. The reason, we have been taught that the column will release under tension a fly back into the patients lap.
    Now my challenge to responders in US and abroad. Find a documented case where this type of release has been experienced in an extrication. For the same number of years, I have used this technique as an back-up to dash rolls and dash pushes to extricate victims from pin-ins where a car has struck a bridge, head-on accidents and other solid objects.I have never had a column release and injure a single patient. I have taken hydraulic jaws and rams and pulled these columns out of the dash and onto the hood of cars without the steering knuckle breaking, the shaft gives and bends first. Are we teaching methods that should be changed after trying a dash roll? I think so. Now I need input and documented cases, not what you have been taught in classes. Please help. Thank you.

    Over the past fifteen years, I have heard and been taught in rescue schools (Georgia Extrication School for example), that we never pull a front wheel drive steering column. The reason, we have been taught that the column will release under tension a fly back into the patients lap.
    Now my challenge to responders in US and abroad. Find a documented case where this type of release has been experienced in an extrication. For the same number of years, I have used this technique as an back-up to dash rolls and dash pushes to extricate victims from pin-ins where a car has struck a bridge, head-on accidents and other solid objects.I have never had a column release and injure a single patient. I have taken hydraulic jaws and rams and pulled these columns out of the dash and onto the hood of cars without the steering knuckle breaking, the shaft gives and bends first. Are we teaching methods that should be changed after trying a dash roll? I think so. Now I need input and documented cases, not what you have been taught in classes. Please help. Thank you.

    Over the past fifteen years, I have heard and been taught in rescue schools (Georgia Extrication School for example), that we never pull a front wheel drive steering column. The reason, we have been taught that the column will release under tension a fly back into the patients lap.
    Now my challenge to responders in US and abroad. Find a documented case where this type of release has been experienced in an extrication. For the same number of years, I have used this technique as an back-up to dash rolls and dash pushes to extricate victims from pin-ins where a car has struck a bridge, head-on accidents and other solid objects.I have never had a column release and injure a single patient. I have taken hydraulic jaws and rams and pulled these columns out of the dash and onto the hood of cars without the steering knuckle breaking, the shaft gives and bends first. Are we teaching methods that should be changed after trying a dash roll? I think so. Now I need input and documented cases, not what you have been taught in classes. Please help. Thank you.



  2. #2
    Lt Tim
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Something I've learned though the years about vehicle rescue is never say never. Store all those things you've learned in your memory banks for future use. I've been more concerned with the tilt wheel joint busting them with front wheel drive. If you pull the steering column, place your chains at the lowest point possible.

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  3. #3
    fireman_387
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Good idea LtTim, better off not having to tell the victim that "aaah well, you were the first that it happened to". Everyone in the fire service knows about the "Murpy's Law" thing... Murphy surely must have been a fire fighter.

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