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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber
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    Default My Spring loaded center punch doesnt work on lexan windows, ha ha ha

    If you dont already know in the future windows in cars wont be that easy to remove without having something other than a spring loaded center punch, etc... I was wondering if anyone has come in contact with any written material or even in the field as far as dealing with these new types of windows. If so please e-mail some info or a link where to look. The closest I have come to taking out these types of windows is on a Winston Cup car and you only need a screw driver or a drill to do that, depending on whether or not they screwed the window in or rivetted it in. Thanx

    hydrantkatcher@aol.com


  2. #2
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Default

    Can you say SAWSALL? T.C.

  3. #3
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    Default

    I talked to Zmag about this some time ago. He had a chunk of it, and proceeded to windmill slam it on the floor at my feet. Our first question was "Now what?" The best thing we came up with was a router. Yeah, your basic Bob Vila special. It should zip thru pretty quickly, but I've never done it. I guess even a Dremmel tool would do it, if you wanna save a little space. Thats a Hell of a topic, because I think some of the ritzy carmakers have already gone Lexan the whole way around. My only question was on a rollover and the "glass" is compressed and you decide to cut it out, will it "twang" out and bust someone up? Help me out Zmag, you've dealt with it...

  4. #4
    Junior Member
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    Tampa, FL. USA
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    Default

    Try using the Roto-zip tool. We have used it on Lexan and the other types of new "glass" with much sucess. Just remember that the new windows "bend" and store energy, that may release during a cutting manuver.

  5. #5
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Rotozips the balls if you got one,but how many Rescue companies do?You can easily cut lexan with a 'cip saw,the only problem is the initial cut and there is a bunch of ways around that.I like the rotozip idea though,has a lot of uses besides lexan. T.C.

  6. #6
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    Default

    I see many replies suggesting the rotor-zip. but what tip do you use?
    Just remain calm, it will be okay!

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Cleveland, NY 13042-USA
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    Default

    OK here I go, As far as any written material I suggest you check past issues of both Firehouse and FireRescue Magazines! I have articles on both the Polycarbonate windows and laminated side glass in old issues of FireRescue Magazine, (During and just after the Larry Stevens era) I do believe my Colleagues Mr Moore, Mr Clark and Mr Shaw have all written articles in various magazines including the sponsor of this forum. just as a little side bar to all this I was first introduced to this new technology in 1998 in Rockford, Illinois. and my article soon followed, When I had the chance to work with Ron Shaw, Ron Moore and other in May of 2000, I got to see what I believe will most likely be the next level in windows, that is Laminated Side Glass. Constructed very similary to Front Windscreens this product offer many advantages and While offering higher security and other protections it is still easily defeated. By using a simple windshield saw! as for the Rotozip on the laminated side glass, IMHO it is much too Slow and produces way too much fine Glass dust which MAY lead to silicosis. As for the polycarbonate, a more correct term than Lexan, well it isn't here yet, I may be coming but not yet , the laminated glass is out there now in some Higher end cars Like BMW, VOLVO and some others. Also please know this is VERY Common in MEXICO, Mid-size cars like the Chrysler products have this in them NOW. As for the technique use your windshield saw to cut along the base, bow the window out and pull out and down and it should easily come out of its track. If it is bonded in place simple remove like a regular winshield. So just let me simply say there is information out there and it is not hidden away, maybe you may have come along after it was published but it has been published. As afar as the Lexan I would say the router, doesn't make the fine dust the rotozip does,but that is MY HUMBLE OPINION
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

  8. #8
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    Rollinsford, NH, USA
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    Default



    [ 08-23-2001: Message edited by: smokeeater51 ]

  9. #9
    Forum Member firefighter26's Avatar
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    Default

    Why go any further then FH.com? Ron Moore has a good article on this
    http://www.firehouse.com/extrication.../august00.html

    I found it answered pretty much all of my questions.

    Good luck
    "No one ever called the Fire Department for doing something smart..."

  10. #10
    Junior Member
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    Default

    one way to take care of lexan is to hit it with a co2 extinguisher and then take a whack at it with a pick head axe or halligan. the intense cold followed by the impact is "supposed" to shatter the lexan. this would be more appropriate for forcing entry into a building than vehicle extrication, though. never tried it myself, but have heard it works.

  11. #11
    Junior Member
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    Default

    I don't think this is any different then some buses, we use a ryobi gas powered rec. saw. It seems to work good, but I have never used anything else to compare to.

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