1. #1
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    Default Heavy Vehicle Stabilization

    I have posted an information requests about vehicle stabilization equipment. Thanks to everyone who posted responces and e-mailed me I have made a decision to buy 4 passenger vehicle stabilization kits. Problem is I work in a city with miles of extremly busy roads and freeways(heavy truck traffic). The passenger kits I am getting are very nice but unable to meet my requirements for heavy vehicle rescue. I have looked at 2 kits, one from airshore and one from paratech. Both kits use the struts for stabilization that are used for building and trench rescue. I am in the process of evaluating what kit I should purchase. I would like to hear from people using these heavy rescue kits, other types of heavy rescue stabilization kits, or just some experienced advise I can use. Also would like to get advise on what I should consider when making this purchase: safety of the kits, weight the kit can support, recommended usage, ease of set up. I am familliar with the passenger vehicle stabilization kits but the heavy rescue ones I could use some outside expert advise.

    Thanks
    Mike Dettloff

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    Got a heavy towing service nearby?Usally when a big truck falls over it stays put.If it doesn't you probably can't conveniently carry enough stuff to really properly stabilize it.One or two heavy duty tow trucks with TRAINED operators can provide as much stabilization as you can get with fancy,expensive shoring.Since most of these trucks have a minimum of 200' ft of wire rope you can reach most wrecks.Air bags and common cribbing are also helpful.E-mail me if you need further,I can supply you with a list of local nationally trained toe operators.T.C.

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    I would have to go with 101 on this one as far as the heavy wreckers. I work in northern Va. and we have all kinds of heavy truck traffic that can really be hard to handle. Lowboys with dozers, dump bed trailors and even box trucks can weigh up to 80,000lbs. That is alot of lift needed. We have several area "Heavy Wrecker" companies. These guys get the call and you get a crain wrecker or what ever you need. The idea of trying to lift that much weight with what is on a RS does not sit to well with me. Don't get me wrong here, it could be done with all the right stuff. I would just feel better off with that big Kenworth holding it up.

    I do believe that one should carry the correct amount of stablization equipment for what could happen. I guess what I mean here is something to prevent further harm or damage. Have the ability to "contain and control" the situation until you can get more resources to the scene to further support the rescue efforts.

    One place you might want to check is with these heavy wrecker companies. I was at the annual truck show at Buds Creek, Md. this year and they had some pretty impressive wreckers there. These guys could point you in the right direction of some of the equipment you are looking for. One of the local companies that my brother has delt with has all kinds of recovery gear they use.

    [ 10-03-2001: Message edited by: pwc606 ]

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    I am begining to think I posted this to early, Oct 13-14 I will be attending a heavy rescue (next step) program in Middletown KY. After that program I am hoping alot of my questions will be anwsered. Still nice to get some different views on what to do. We have an excellent wrecker/recovery service in our area. Owner happens to be a firefighter of a neigboring department and very knoledgeable in vehicle extrication. Problem is when the doo-doo hits the fan and a big boy falls its usually when weather is bad and resources like a heavy wrecker are tied up. Plus they are comming from approx 8 miles from their yard if they have an operator at the yard. We have had incidents in the past where a driver of a tractor trailer was pinned and we had to wait for a wrecker to assist us extricate the patient. What I was tasked with is purchasing equipment to perform that type of rescue our self. I have money for equipment, but not a heavy wrecker. I am looking for the ability to perform a rescue safely using airbags and the heavy jacks to shore. Lift an inch crib an inch type thing. Most of the incidents we have had with pinned drivers involve lifting the vehicle approx. 5-6" to get the person out with little hydraulic tool usage to remove other componets. Just getting some ideas on how to complete this task and with what tools? Also do you think that this could be completed safely?

    Thanks for all the help
    Mike Dettloff

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    Mike,Couple more things to think about.A resource is WWW.Wreckmaster.Com.This is a traing outfit that lists several operators in your area,any would be happy to provide information to you.As I have a bit of experience in this field forget Hyd. jacks.Too slow unless you're talking house jacks plus lift area is too small.Most upsets compromise an already lightweight vehicle(power unit)Airbags with plenty of old mudflaps/conveyor belting are good.A good set of rams are helpful.Cribbing in mass quantities.Get together with your Heavy towers and develop a plan,if there is a upset one of them WILL be responding.A good winch on your rescue with a trained operator can be helpful.Look to your local towing association for the date of their tow show and send some people.Or contact Wreckmaster,Donnie can probably set you into a local class or custom design a bridge course for you,remember we deal daily with the very subject that is now facing you.Just remember that due to size and construction of TT units Hyd. recue tools are not as effective on these vehicles as they are on regular vehicles.In my experience a good set of air bags,some alloy chain,blocking and rams have been as efficient a systen as I've found for the job.Don't have to be big bags either,usually you're only lifting a small part of up to 110,000 in your state if I remember correctly.Two twenty ton bags will easily lift any portion of a power unit.One will do it but less control.Hope this helps.T.C.

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    Rescue 101 I tried to e-mail you but for some reason i cant get your address. if you could please e-mail me at mdettloff@auburnhills.org
    thanks
    Mike

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    Its a million dollar question...almost!
    What gear and how much do you spend.
    We not so long ago had a job...big truck v's little car and as someone else has posted here we outsourced for the right equipment...got a crane in!
    They were on site after being called in 30 odd mins.
    Maybe looking at some sort of "mutual" aid from such types of resources is your option?
    We are working on a register of this type of resource now ...this includes timber for shoring...hire companies for diggers, major lighting...etc
    Check out our case study on the incident I mentioned above...we did it that way, maybe not for you? www.blacktownfirerescue.org then go to archives, truck V's car
    Andy
    www.blacktownfirerescue.org

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