1. #26
    Forum Member
    MidwayChief2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Pawleys Island, SC
    Posts
    75

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    Hi Guys, how goes it? Firekatz, you present an interesting situation regarding the initial RIT response in which I get questioned on quite often. To me, the most important tactic a RIT can do during a firefighter "ENTRAPMENT" is to transport, connect, and MAINTAIN an independant air supply for the pinned firefighter. This not only provides life support for the victim, but buys the RIT invaluable time to size up and perform the extrication. The question here is "How do we do that"?. In my opinion through my experience is that the "toxic bottle change" method is just to tricky in a smoke filled environment. To disconnect a downed firefighters SCBA cylinder from the high pressure connection and try to reconnect it to another cylinder in this type of situation is to difficult. I'm not saying that it can't be done, but that this method takes extensive training and practice to be able to complete with a minimal amount of "Disconnect time" for the downed firefighter. If a nervous or jittery RIT member attempts this and cross threads the cylinder, or debris gets onto the threads, there will be a major problem for the RIT officer to correct, not to mention the "disconnect time" the victim will have to take. I see that you mentioned you take in a complete SCBA just in case, which is a good move. My question is why carry in the extra cylinders, which creates a mobility problem in one way or another, when you can complete a successful SCBA changeover with what you are already taking in? The initial RIT is already burdoned with the difficult task of deploying, searching, and performing the assessment let alone be bogged down with additional equipment. I have found that you can complete just about all of your changeovers with one complete SCBA rescue pack using the LDV (Lung demand valve) swap, breathing tube swap, or total facepiece changeover with very little complications. Of course we all must be proficient in the methods I have described above or you will undoubtably fail as a RIT. It is very important to keep the facepiece with the SCBA rescue pack that you are deploying with. If you find a downed firefighter with a cracked or missing facepiece, and did not bring the spare, you will be in for trouble. As always, my advice is this, if it is working good for you keep doing it. The best way to keep testing your methods is to keep trying other methods. If you find even one thing that will quicken your procedure up, incorporate it. That's what I have been doing for the past 6 years with RIT training. By refining these procedures we will eventually come close to perfecting them. You guys stay safe and have a nice holiday season. Keep up the good fight and train in RIT..... And remember, no one is coming in for us, but us!

    Jim Crawford
    Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire
    James K. Crawford
    Assistant Fire Chief
    Midway Fire Rescue
    Pawleys Island, SC

  2. #27
    Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    wintergreen va.
    Posts
    30

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    This is in response to those who do not agree with rit team tools or training.You should seriously consider expanding your training to include rit team operations, and perhaps mayday firefighter down. I say this to try and get you to understand as I now do, the importance of these practices. As we all know things can go to H@#!! in a heartbeat. The worst situation we could encounter is not being prepared. No one likes feeling helpless. Fortunately these programs are designed to better prepare us for the worse. Obviously these courses were designed using information that was gathered in the field through trial and error. Methods that have been tried and tested by firemen like us have proven to save lives! Better tools, training is a good thing but we all must be open to try new things. I strongly feel that the rit training, the rit tool kit, is essential for all departments. Please consider these things and be safe.


    These comments, or opinions are my pesonal ones and are not necessarilly those believed or expressed by my employer. Resqfreek

  3. #28
    Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    wintergreen va.
    Posts
    30

    Thumbs down

    This is in response to those who do not agree with rit team tools or training.You should seriously consider expanding your training to include rit team operations, and perhaps mayday firefighter down. I say this to try and get you to understand as I now do, the importance of these practices. As we all know things can go to H@#!! in a heartbeat. The worst situation we could encounter is not being prepared. No one likes feeling helpless. Fortunately these programs are designed to better prepare us for the worse. Obviously these courses were designed using information that was gathered in the field through trial and error. Methods that have been tried and tested by firemen like us have proven to save lives! Better tools, training is a good thing but we all must be open to try new things. I strongly feel that the rit training, the rit tool kit, is essential for all departments. Please consider these things and be safe.


    These comments, or opinions are my pesonal ones and are not necessarilly those believed or expressed by my employer. Resqfreek

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