1. #1
    BURNSEMS
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post DRY ATTACK LINES

    In recent months I have seen magazines with FirFighters in offensive positions wih Dry Attack Lines, Why put ourselves in harms way when it SHOULD only take Seconds to get water for the attack.

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    Here today for a Safer Tomorrow

  2. #2
    KNOBMAN
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    At my company we advance the hose first 99.9% of the time. Who ever the driver is will wait until we call him to charge the line. Alot of are fires are in row homes and you can imagine trying to hump 300 ft of charged line up 3 flights of steps! Is it the BEST way? NO, is it the SAFEST way? NO, but it is our way. I have confidence with the brothers I work with an I know if things start to look bad from the outside who ever is driving going to put water in our line.

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    UNION AND PROUD OF IT!

  3. #3
    codered
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I agree with knobman. It is much quicker to get water on a fire by dragging a dry line as opposed a charged line. Have the line charged when you get to the top of the stairs or the fire room.

  4. #4
    S. Cook
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We brought a guy in for a class and he metioned this is what his department does. You could hear a pin drop it got so quite. But, and he stressed this, it works for them and it's not for everybody. That's what counts. And they don't do it on all calls, just when long or difficult stretches are needed and it is reasonably safe to do so.

    From what I can tell, to do it as safe as possible, you have to at least have:

    excellent communications
    trust in your equipment and maintenance
    trust in your engineer
    whatever else you need

    I can see the good (and bad) in this but let's be honest Jeff, when you were here, would you have wanted to hump a charged line from 832 containment to 905? I'm sure you remember those stairs...

  5. #5
    BURNSEMS
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    Hey Scott, Yes I remember those stairs and there was no way any of us were going to drag a charged Line That far, however I do understand in some locations this would be difficult but after seeing a Local VFD lay a dead Line to a House with the bottom floor fully charged, and the pictures, I just wonder how much is nesessity and how much is LAZY Our Policy is No Dead Line is Taken further than halfway UNLESS it involves our appartment complex then we have no choice due to the Lay out and location of Standpipes other than to Lay the Attack lines Dead and PreStage our Inital Attack crews, So I understand in all cases it just cant happen per Text Book But why not take advantage of the opportunity while you have it. Just my point of view

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    Here today for a Safer Tomorrow

  6. #6
    jpm
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    interesting burns i guess thats just one more good point that this forum brings out.

    we have (3) preconnects (2) 300' 1 3/4 and (1) 250' 2 1/2 . on that kind of fire i would pull the duece and a half and would hate humping that bad boy charged. but maybe consider it. i was just wondering do most of you guys start sucking air when you get off the truck or do you wait till you get to the door? thanks

    stay low stay safe

  7. #7
    e33
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    I think, as in many arguments, that we must remember our job will put us in danger no matter what we do...there is just something about going into hostile atmospheres that you cant make that safe. But to the topic on hand. Stretching the line dry will be the easiest way most of the time. It is critical to stress that the line be flaked out and checked prior to charging to assure that kinks have been removed and that the line is not pinched in doors or stairwell chases. This is where I see so many atack teams failing, 3 guys on the nozzle fighting each other and nobody back at the door or stairs to hump the line up and check it prior to charging. Never should the line be advanced beyond a safer point (i.e. door of fire apt or room, or stairwell of fire floor) without being charged. Charging the line includes keeping the nozzle open to bleed all air and assure that there is truly pump pressure pushing the water into the line. Kneeling on the line as you mask up or get into position keeps it from being knocked away by the water surge.My vote goes to dry lines.

  8. #8
    dc45b
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    In my department we most of the times charge the lines before entry. It all depends on the fire itself. Another item that I will trow into the pot is if you beleive that smoke burns(involving flashovers) then you would apply it has you go down the hallway. I have done it in recent weeks. Cool the sistuation down. CHarging the lines before entry will always be the safe way to do it.

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  9. #9
    dc45b
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    In my department we most of the times charge the lines before entry. It all depends on the fire itself. Another item that I will trow into the pot is if you beleive that smoke burns(involving flashovers) then you would apply it has you go down the hallway. I have done it in recent weeks. Cool the sistuation down. CHarging the lines before entry will always be the safe way to do it.

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  10. #10
    Bob Snyder
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I'm with e33 on this one. In general, we tend to advance dry lines as far as the hose team feels is appropriate, and then charge them on their orders. This saves on air consumption, and ends up getting water on the fire a little faster in many cases. It does, as S. Cook pointed out, require that you have warranted faith in your equipment, your engineer, and (I would add) your own judgement. Besides, it's certainly not any more dangerous than doing unsupported search and rescue, or ventilating directly from a roof over heavy fire load, but people do these things all the time without a second thought.

  11. #11
    Ledbelly
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We also advance the line dry and charge it before entering fire area; most of our guys usually mask up right before going in too. At least this allows the attack team to get their %@!* together right before entry...charged hose? everybody on air? lights, poles, axes? 1-2-3...GO.

  12. #12
    Truckie from Missouri
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    I think using good sense along with good sizeup should determine how far you strech the line before charging it.

    Combine that with training, teamwork, and communications, things should work out well!



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    Proud Member of IAFF Local 3133!

    Stay safe.
    Ken

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