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  1. #1
    dwightpeck
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Standard Riding Assignments

    I am from a 1900 call per year, 4 engine/1 tower ladder, volunteer department in a mostly urban area. We are interested in developing a 'riding assignment' SOG, whereas your seat on the engine or truck has specific responsiblities and/or duties. For example, if you're in seat 4 on the truck, you know that on arrival at the fireground you will begin throwing ladders unless otherwise directed. Currently the officer makes assignments en route based on info from the call (we hear the actual 911 calls prior to dispatch through a live tie-line), who is on the truck, and info from scene sizeup. Inevitably, the FF's in back begin debating/choosing/asking for their assignments while en route- causing distraction for the driver and officer. We are looking to apply this, if feasible, to all of our response types, whether fire, rescue, or ems.
    Our station is staffed 'round the clock, and our average staffing on the initial alarm is 8- 4 on the engine, 4 on the truck. Automatic mutual aid brings an engine company staffed with 3 that has about a 3 minute response into our area. If not staffed on the initial alarm, our 3rd and 4th engines average 4 and 9 minutes respectively to get out the door.
    So after bearing with me through the preliminariy info, here is the question- how does your department handle riding assignments? Who grabs what tool/equipment unless otherwise told on arrival? Can anyone give me advice for our situation? (besides yelling at everyone on the truck to shut up for a minute so you can all think...) Thanks in advance for all replies.

    ------------------
    Capt. Dwight Peck
    Seminole Trail VFD


  2. #2
    Truck30
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    For the last 18 years, our Dept. uses the system that is used in Prince George's County
    in Maryland. We picked it up while riding down there. It is brief and easy to learn. We have one for the Engine Co. and one for the Truck.

  3. #3
    SBrooks
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Seminole Trail I guess?
    A lot depends on how you run...do the tower and the engine both pull out at the same time? I'm going to assume that sometimes they do, some times they don't. I'll also assume that your extrications are performed by CARS.

    In PG County where I volunteer the assignments differ between stations but typically go something like this.
    Engine(3-4 ffs)
    1. Driver - Drives safely, pumps, est. water supply
    2. Officer - Leads hose team, carries hydra ram or halligan bar and radio, backs up lineman if only three on board.
    3. Lineman - (officer's side bucket seat) pulls attack line
    4. Layout man - (driver's side bucket seat) takes supply line finish to hydrant, rides to fire and backs up the lineman. Ensures line is flaked properly before entry.

    In PG we drop 3" at the hydrant and the next arriving engine picks it up and pumps it. If you use a hydrant valve or leave the man at the hydrant, the layout man would stay there until the water supply is established.

    Engine (5+ firefighters)
    1. Driver
    2. Officer
    3. Lineman
    4. Backup man
    5. Layout man
    6. Bar man (halligan bar & hydraram)
    7-8. Extra. Recommend throwing ladders and insuring placement of first line, chasing kinks, passing hose at corners, etc.

    One concept that is sometimes hard to explain but easy to understand once you see it in action...the positions must be filled in order, and they correspond to seats...however, if the bells ring and i run to the engine and find that I am the fifth person, I'd probably sit in the 6th spot, b/c I'd rather run the bar than be the layout man. That being said, if someone else gets on after me, the seats are first come first serve. Now if we go down the road and there are only five of us, I know I have to layout before I can grab the bar.

    Truck

    1. Driver - Drives, sets up aerial and/or throws ground ladders, operates turntable, assists on roof, controls utilities, sets up lights and fans, helps overhaul
    2. Officer - Leads search team. Takes radio and either a hook or a bar. If you have a TIC, he'd carry it.
    3. Tip operator (for us, tillerman) - sets up aerial with driver or throws ladder, rides bucket to roof, performs ventilation, throws ladders, helps overhaul.
    4. Ironsman - carries bar, axe, and hydraram performs search with officer.
    5&6. - Forms team and throws groundladders- if only one, works with driver
    7. Hook and Can - carries a hook and a pw can, searches with officer.
    8. Roofman - works with tip operator.

    (actually, usually positions 5&6 and 7 are switched, but if you always run with your engine, ground ladders are much more important than carrying a can behind a hose line.)

    Again, seats are first come first serve while in the station, but when you go down the road, they have to be filled in order.

    For non structure fire calls, you make up sops:
    Car Fires:
    Driver: position apparatus, ensure line is flaked, charge line, set up road flares.
    Officer: size up & commmand, watch for safe operations, ensures vehicle in park, etc
    Line: Pulls attack line
    Layout: Takes Pick Head axe and opens hood, if necessary, controls battery
    Others: ensure line is flaked out, perform EMS if necessary

    You could make a very similar SOP for MVAs.

  4. #4
    FitzBFDT2
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Dwight,

    In Bayonne we will always have a minimum of an officer, a chauffeur, and a firefighter. Let's start with the truck company. Due to the fact that in the summer we will have heavy vacations thus leaving us with either 3 or 4 members and in the rest of the year light vactions, leaving us with 5 members, I think I can give you a good mix.

    3 members Officer, Chauffeur, Firefighter
    Officer-Radio,portable light, irons
    Firefighter- 6' Hook, 2.5 gal water can (if hi-rise or building with metal doors and bucks(jambs), bring hydra force tool also).This firefighter teams up with the officer.
    Chauffeur-sets up apparatus for civilian removal and /or 2nd means of egress for the brothers. If unable due to overhead obstructions,will throw ladders and assumes the duties of outside vent man.Radio,portable light,6' hook and a halligan.

    4 members Officer, Chauffeur, Two(2) Firefighters
    Officer-Radio,portable light, irons
    Firefighter- 6' Hook, 2.5 gal water can (if hi-rise or building with metal doors and bucks(jambs), bring hydra force tool also). This firefighter teams up with the officer.
    Firefighter(OVM)-Radio,portable light,6' hook and a halligan. If top floor fire, brings the Life Saving Rope bag and roof saw.
    Chauffeur-sets up apparatus for civilian removal and /or 2nd means of egress for the brothers.If unable due to overhead obstructions,will throw ladders and if may join up with the OVM. Radio,portable light,6' hook and flat head axe.

    5 members Officer, Chauffeur, Three(3) Firefighters
    Officer-Radio,portable light, irons
    Firefighter- 6' Hook, 2.5 gal water can (if hi-rise or building with metal doors and bucks(jambs), bring hydra force tool also). This firefighter teams up with the officer.
    Firefighter(OVM)-Radio,portable light,6' hook and a halligan.
    Firefighter(OVM/roof)-Radio,portable light,6' hook and a flat head axe. If top floor fire, brings the Life Saving Rope bag and roof saw.
    Chauffeur-sets up apparatus for civilian removal and /or 2nd means of egress for the brothers.If unable due to overhead obstructions,will throw ladders and remain outside and assist with the changing of the truck company's SCBA's and truck company duties in the vicinity of the front of the fire building.

    Hope this is helpful

    ------------------
    Kevin M. Fitzhenry, bfdt2@injersey.com
    Firefighter, Truck Co. 2
    City of Bayonne (NJ) FD
    www.bayonne.net/bfd/

    [This message has been edited by FitzBFDT2 (edited January 10, 2000).]

  5. #5
    FitzBFDT2
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Dwight,

    As for the Engine Company, here goes. Same manning as the truck company(3 to 5)

    3 members-Officer,Nozzleman,Chauffeur
    Officer-Radio,portable light. Advances hose with nozzleman.
    Nozzleman-Nozzle and at least 50' of hose to fire floor
    Chauffeur-Pump operator

    4 members-Officer,Nozzleman,Back up man,Chauffeur
    Officer-Radio,portable light
    Nozzleman-Nozzle and at least 50' of hose to fire floor
    Back up man-takes enough hose to allow nozzleman to reach the fire floor. Positions himself right behind the nozzleman after line is in place.
    Chauffeur-Pump operator

    5 members-Officer,Nozzleman,Back up man,Door/control man,Chauffeur
    Officer-Radio,portable light
    Nozzleman-Nozzle and at least 50' of hose to fire floor
    Back up man-takes enough hose to allow nozzleman to reach the fire floor. Positions himself right behind the nozzleman after line is in place.
    Door man/control man-After assisting Chauffeur making sure enough line was stretched, follows the attack team in making sure there are no kinks and positioning himself in a place where he can assist with the advancement of the attack line.
    Chauffeur-Pump operator

    Again, hope this is helpful.

    ------------------
    Kevin M. Fitzhenry, bfdt2@injersey.com
    Firefighter, Truck Co. 2
    City of Bayonne (NJ) FD
    www.bayonne.net/bfd/

    [This message has been edited by FitzBFDT2 (edited January 10, 2000).]

    [This message has been edited by FitzBFDT2 (edited January 10, 2000).]

  6. #6
    FitzBFDT2
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Dwight,

    All the tool assignments and positions are based upon where you sit on the apparatus.

    By knowing your assignment prior to the call, it doesn't allow for the confusion and/or bickering you were talking about. It also does away with duplication of work. It allows for efficient work to be accomplished. Also, each member is accountable for their assigned task. They know that if the task is not accomplished, some part of the job will suffer.

    We are also given assignments for MVA's with entrapment and CFR-D(Certified First Responder-Defibrillator) This is also based upon where we sit on the apparatus. Give it a try, you will see what I am talking about.



    ------------------
    Kevin M. Fitzhenry, bfdt2@injersey.com
    Firefighter, Truck Co. 2
    City of Bayonne (NJ) FD
    www.bayonne.net/bfd/

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