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  1. #1
    baileyfd
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Third alarm protocol

    Our county fire coordinater recently posted a new protocol for all of our county vfd`s. The posting reads:"When called on a third alarm, the dept. involved shall deploy tankers only unless otherwise specefied". I`m just curious how other depts. around the country handle multiple alarm scenerios.


  2. #2
    jim whitfield
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Bailey,
    We have 1st and 2nd alarm assignments for our county (Sunflower Co, MS). Basically, 1st alarm response includes 2 stations. The first arriving station takes up the fire attack function, second arriving provides manpower support for attack as well as establishing water shuttle function.

    2nd Alarm would be called in if the water supply was some distance (more than 1-2 miles) away from the fire, or the flow requirements dictate an unusually high flow.

    ------------------
    James A. Whitfield, Jr., MCEM
    Sunflower County Fire Coordinator
    Indianola, Missisippi
    (662) 887-6253
    jjwhit@deltaland.net
    Battalion 1 - The Pride of the South


  3. #3
    FiRsqDvr45
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I may be missing something but if we have gone to a 3rd alarm we would have other units other then pumpers and tankers coming (if we even had tankers coming at all). What about searching, venting, utilities control, salvage, RIT/FAST, checking exposures, etc. Just because an IC strikes a third alarm doesnt mean you should abandon drafting and hydrants does it? We would in certain areas use tankes to provide a back up water supply or even sumpplement what we had.That policy may be to strict and cause problems.I may be confused as to the brief question so pardon me if I am off in left field.Meaning no disrespect as I like the topic, just curious as to more details I guess.

    Jay Ellingson
    Newington NH FD

    [This message has been edited by FiRsqDvr45 (edited January 21, 2000).]

  4. #4
    Truck 2
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    I think what your depts. are calling a 3rd. alarm, should be called a tanker task force! Extra alarms vary around the country and between volunteer depts.and career depts. I think a tanker shuttle is fine when it is required, but to many times a LDH lay would work much better. We just had a pizza shop and attached house burn in our area and they ran a tanker shuttle from a stream 2- 10ths. of a mile from the fire scene where they could have layed LDH, they were supplying two ladder pipes and several hand lines. It takes time to lay hose but it takes time to set up a tanker shuttle also.

    Lt.Chuck
    Truck-2

    ------------------

  5. #5
    Lieutenant Gonzo
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    When a fire goes to a third alarm, we notify Fire District 14 Control and they handle the assignments for mutual aid according to the Statewide Fire Mobilization Plan. The entire district is set up for up to a 9 alarm response. The Statewide Fire Mobilization Plan worked well during the tragedy in Worcester, firefighters and apparatus from all over the state took part in covering Worcester's fire stations during their ordeal.

    ------------------
    Take care and be safe...Lt. Gonzo

  6. #6
    stvfd88
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Third alarm in our area involves a minimum of two extra engines, a tanker, and a support unit, as well as any available manpower. Also included is a change of quarters from mutual aid companies, and typically an extra command vehicle from a neighboring department. Be safe!

    ------------------
    Scott Lambert
    Seminole Trail Volunteer Fire Department

  7. #7
    jim whitfield
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Let me make a clarification:
    Our 1st Alarm involves two districts (stations). The response may vary from a minimum of 2 engines, to engines & tankers in varying numbers, with no more than 3 of each on 1st Alarm. The first on-scene engine takes up attack & utility security, with second-in filling any needed fireground functions (VES, RIT, etc.), but being in a rural area, most fires don't require venting (fire takes care of that for us).

    2nd Alarm brings in additional district(s) depending on the location, as well as Rehab Sector in summer.

    Didn't want you guys thinking we weren't covering the bases, just didn't make myself clear!

    Have fun and be safe!!!


    ------------------
    James A. Whitfield, Jr., MCEM
    Sunflower County Fire Coordinator
    Indianola, Missisippi
    (662) 887-6253
    jjwhit@deltaland.net
    Battalion 1 - The Pride of the South


  8. #8
    jsouza
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    A 3rd alarm brings to the scene the same as a 2nd and 4th alarm does: 4 engines and 2 ladders. It also calls in additional resources for station coverage.

    At a 5th alarm, or at any other point that the IC feels he/she needs it, a county task force can be called in. There are different types of task forces: Structural, Tanker, LDH, Forestry, Brush Breaker, etc. All of these task forces are pre-defined, and bring in apparatus from neighboring towns in the county. A simple phone call from our dispatch to the department in charge of task force notification, and they will get a hold of the incoming departments (leaving our dispatch to worry about the fire, not calling 4 to 8 other towns for apparatus). We'll generally call in a task force once every year or so, its a nice way to get help without draining the next town's apparatus.


    ------------------

    "I can think of no more stirring symbol of man's humanity to man than a fire engine" -- Kurt Vonnegut

  9. #9
    pvfr fyrfyter
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question

    things must be drastically different here in Nebraska because anytime we can't handle a fire ourselves its mutual aid. Other departments don't empty the station, usually there is specifics as to what is needed. If not you take a minute and ask by radio what the commander needs. But then again our population ratio isn't near what it is in other places so most dept. have only one engine and more tankers to fit our needs. generally if you need more than one engine around here its likely a surround and drown with the closest mutual aids being atleast 15 minutes depending on time of day.

  10. #10
    jboczek
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I agree with the Nebraska people. If we call for help it's from a neighboring district and we ask for what we need. it may be pumpers, tankers, just bodies or whatever. It's luxury to have a set response for a 2nd or 3rd or 4th alarm.

  11. #11
    SBrooks
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    PG County, MD does it similar to MA...4 engines & 2 trucks for each alarm. There are also special units that go on the second alarm, but our dispatch protocol is in transition right now, and I'm not sure what they are...believe it is a squad on the first alarm, stuff like various command officers, a mobile command post, investigator(s), air unit, water supply unit (LDH & 2000 gpm pump), etc.

  12. #12
    FitzBFDT2
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Our department has a Four(4) alarm repsonse system.

    1st Alarm - 3 Engine Companies, 1 Ladder Company and a Battalion Chief. Upon the confirmation of a working fire an Engine Company is assigned as a Rapid Intervention Team, a Safety Battalion is assigned.

    2nd Alarm - 1 Engine Company, 1 Ladder Company, Air Unit, a Deputy and the Chief of Department

    3rd Alarm - 2 Engine Companies, 1 Ladder Company

    4th Alarm - 2 Engine Companies(1 of which is a Jersey City FD company) and a Jersey City Ladder Company



    ------------------
    Kevin M. Fitzhenry, bfdt2@injersey.com
    Firefighter, Truck Co. 2
    City of Bayonne (NJ) FD
    www.bayonne.net/bfd/

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