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  1. #1
    StaticPressure
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking Platforms versus Sticks

    In reading the specs for 3 new aerial platforms, I am flooded with the thoughts of the old aerial ladder versus a platform. We had some good debates. How about now? What are the pro's and cons of each and which is suited for you?

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    Disclaimer: The views expressed in this post are purely mine and not that of the department or any associations of which I am a member. They have their own ridiculous views.

    Stay Safe and Stay In the House!


  2. #2
    Batt #2
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Depends on the area you sevice. If you have long set backs to the front of buldings and area going to be working at low elevations you woul dbe better off with a platform. If you have small set backs and you the ladder at a greater elevation angle you can get by with a stick. You need to think about work area. FF can work a lot safer from a platform than stick.
    You have to think about the size of the platform to the size of the stick.
    Station floors, bay doors, money difference and if you have any low bridge decks.
    You can get a mid mount platform under 10 foot to .
    We have a 100 platform and it replaced a 100 foot stick. Now the stick was 22 years old, but I love the platfrom

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  3. #3
    STATION2
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    A needs assessment of your city, town or area is needed. If you have buildings that require large GPM flows than look at the platform. In addition buildings that have a large evacuation potential should be considered. Platforms in my opinion are better than sticks for this, although both will work. Look at your SOP's. If you do a large amnount of outside vent work like D.C.F.D. than a platfrom will provide a better work area. Your resources available on your 1st alarm assigment can help you figure it out also. If you are a one Truck Co. town, do you have automatic-aid? If so, is the responding dept sending you a platform or a stick? I do not advocate not buying something just because your neighbor has one. This can put you in a spot when their rig is out of service or unavailable. These are my pro's for a platform: Ability to flow more water than a stick w/2 monitors versus 1. Increased rescue capabilities interms of tip load (Its also easier to coax a panicky civilian into a platform than onto a stick 30' or more above the ground). Safer working from a bucket than a stick for roof ventilation on pitched roofs. Safer and more efficient for opening up outside surfaces and for horizontal ventilation above the 3rd floor. Larger working area for technical rescue incidents such as high angle, swift water, etc. The negatives for a platform are: Greater road height. Greater GVWR. Overhang in front or rear (Depending on builder and type). Increased cost. A stick has its applications though, in a 2 truck town, I would get both. Each can compliment the other. In my volunteer dept. were going w/a platform because of increased GPM from 2 monitors at all elevations and improved rescue capabilities. Buy whats right for your dept. Don't buy what X dept did just to keep up. As Batt. 2 said, look at your offsets from the roadways to determine the SIZE of the device and not what type of device. Your needs assessment will tell you what TYPE of device. Be safe.

    Larry

  4. #4
    LHS
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I would strongly suggest you look at the info on fire trucks on the road , the data plates of what is sold many time contradicts the sales data. Stuff like 2000 gpm at any angle and 500 tip loads, you'll be suprised what you will read, it will be night and day, who cares what the literature says what the operator is suppose to follow is the real truth.

  5. #5
    LHS
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I would strongly suggest you look at the info on fire trucks on the road , the data plates of what is sold many time contradicts the sales data. Stuff like 2000 gpm at any angle and 500 tip loads, you'll be suprised what you will read, it will be night and day, who cares what the literature says what the operator is suppose to follow is the real truth.

  6. #6
    LHS
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I would strongly suggest you look at the info on fire trucks on the road , the data plates of what is sold many time contradicts the sales data. Stuff like 2000 gpm at any angle and 500 tip loads, you'll be suprised what you will read, it will be night and day, who cares what the literature says what the operator is suppose to follow is the real truth.

  7. #7
    chiefjay4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    My company currently runs a engine and a 100' straight stick. We are actively persuing getting rid of the engine and replacing it with a quint(We have eight other engines in the township). As chief, I am leaning toward a platform(70 plus), mostly because of the exsisting straight stick. I feal that having one of each is the way to go. Does anyone out there have both? If so how is it working out?

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