1. #1
    Dalmatian90
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post Fire Scenario (?): Tactical Foundations

    (Post moved from Firefighter's Forums where it got buried under a ton of new posts!)

    Rather than a full blown fire scenario (just not feeling very creative recently ) let's do so 1.5 second drills.

    1.5 second drills are the kinds of thing that should pretty much become second nature to the driver/officer/experienced firefighter. Especially when they keep quizzing the probies out of the blue on the material.

    They form a "foundation" for a lot of tactical decisions -- do I have the tools, techniques, and training to do __________.

    Here's three:

    1. You pull up on a chain-link gate with a chain and padlock. Fire's on the other side, you don't have a key.
    -- What tool(s) will you use to open it.
    -- Where are they on the truck
    -- How will you use them.

    2. Let's pull your "most used" handline:
    -- What's the diameter
    -- What's the flow rate & pattern you keep the nozzle preset on.
    -- What's the maximum flow the nozzle can do
    -- What pump pressure is required to get maximum flow from that nozzle.

    3. Master Stream/Deck Gun:
    -- What size tip is on it (or fog nozzle)
    -- What is the flow we start at
    -- How long will our tank of water last
    -- What pump pressure is needed

    Ok folks, who else can think of some "1.5 second drills" to add to the list?



  2. #2
    benson911
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I like Engine Operator Stuff, too.

    Review the steps to put the pump in gear...
    1. Stop the truck (Transmission in Neutral)
    2. Set the brake
    3. Switch to pump
    4. Engage transmission
    5. Chock wheels
    6. Pull tank-to-pump valve
    7. Recirculate or flow water
    (Items may not be exact for all trucks - you should know yours.)

    SCBA donning and doffing - you should be able to do this blindfolded and in your sleep.

    Clearing an intersection....
    1. Check the first lane to your left, then your right, then the next lane to your left, then your right until you are clear. Don't forget to give the left one last look before advancing. The left is first because they are the closest to your apparatus in the US - switch directions for the UK.

    Good Post Matt - long time, no read.

  3. #3
    MetalMedic
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    Originally posted by benson911:

    Clearing an intersection....
    1. Check the first lane to your left, then your right, then the next lane to your left, then your right until you are clear. Don't forget to give the left one last look before advancing. The left is first because they are the closest to your apparatus in the US - switch directions for the UK.

    Good Post Matt - long time, no read.
    Hey Benson... long time no see. I don't suppose you have been to a defensive driving class lately. They are now teaching that you clear the side you have the best view on first, then the other and then back to the first (instead of the Left, Right, Left we all learned in EVOC). The theory being that you will give more attention to the intersection since you can start clearing it as soon as one directions comes into sight. Whereas if you do the left,right,left, one might ignore the right while waiting for the left to come into sight.

    I still do the left,right, left... but you folks might want to try the other method to see if you like it better.



    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

  4. #4
    AVF&R452
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Here is a few:

    Take note of a street address in your first due(second due?). For a quick drill write it down, Have the others in the station use the map book to find the location and directions, first/second/third due, nearest hydrant/water source, target hazards, etc.
    This can get as elaborate as you wish, fill sites/dump sites. Hazmats(use the ERG), road closures, weight limits, etc. You can throw in any scenario you want. I tried this once for our jr. F/F's, soon had everyone in the station involved.


    Benson mentioned SCBA, Great, Now how about your neighbor's SCBA, Your mutual aid dept. probably uses something different. Even options within the same brand can make it a different unit.

    Same goes with other equipment, PPV Fans, Generators, Pumps, Saws etc. all differ in some respect. Nothing looks or feels worse than pulling your guts out trying to start a saw, then having someone walk up, flip a switch and start it first pull. Get GOOD with yours, then learn the others around you.


    All I can think of right now, Not exactly 1.5 seconds worth, But not extremely time consuming either.


    Who's next,

    Jim

  5. #5
    benson911
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Hey Metal - You sit on the left side of the truck to drive it in the US, right? Then most of the time you would see the left lane closest to you first, right? Darn cops being firemen and introducing all that cop driving stuff in the fire service.....

    Just kidding, thanks for the clarification.

    I agree, you clear whatever lane you can clear first. I just used the left to remind people that's the FIRST lane they will enter and, thus the first lane where someone could hit you.

    It's nice to see you post too, Metal, how's my favorite fire chief down there in Orrville?

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