Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    firehat87
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool Aerial tip as standpipe?

    I've heard some people advocate unscrewing the tip of an aerial discharge and using it as a standpipe for a company on the upper floor or roof. I also hear some others speaking otu against this because it removes the aerial from service. My dept. doesn't have an aerial so it's not really a pressing question for me, but I was just wondering what y'all think.


  2. #2
    Fireman488
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    Our department Tower Ladder has a double gated wye, piped into the bucket, which gives us the ability to stretch lines from it.

    While we don't employee this evolution very often; but it has proved to be very useful at times, especially during overhaul.

    Stay safe.

    Fireman488

  3. #3
    F52 Westside
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Like 488, our dept. has used this occasionally and it has come in handy. Especially when the buildings standpipe system has gone down. Our Tower is setup where it can be used seperate of the Master stream nozzles, and on our Ladder we only can use the Main pipe. The time we have used it was when their was not a need for immediate rescues.

    ------------------
    Eddie C. - a.k.a - PTFD21
    ECarn21's Homefire Page
    Local 3008
    "Doin' it for lives n' property"

  4. #4
    Skidz
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    firehat87,


    Ahhh, the flying standpipe. We have a Mid-mount tower with a prepiped 4" waterway. I have never seen it used. I have never used it. The guys at my station who have been there since the placed opened for business say they can not remember seeing it. It can be done but the down fall is like you said it takes the aerial out of service. If I am on the truck it is a truck company not a engine company. I understand if the standpipe is out of service. I cannot help that but, generally speaking we don't put water on the fire.

    SKIDZZ

    ------------------
    PROUD, PROFESSIONAL, PROGRESSIVE


    Member IAFF Local 1664
    esfpd444@starpower.net

  5. #5
    Staylow
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Using the aerial to deliver a supply to upper floors is rarely used in my department because it takes maneuverability away from the truck. We stretch large lines up the stairs and wye them off from the floor below if the standpipes are down, or if more lines are needed. This doesn't take that much more time that carrying a supply line up an aerial. But, it keeps the truck free.


    Stay Safe!

  6. #6
    Looper
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We don't do it very often, but we have the capability. Our tower has two 2.5" gated standpipe connections, one on either side of the nozzle. Our old tower had a similar set up, but also included a gated wye with two 1.75" handlines (1-50ft, 1-8ft). The short 8' line was used from inside the basket -- useful when we needed some elevated water, but not 1000 gpm worth from the master stream. The 50' section was set up to be a protection line for roof operations, or an attack line for upper floor fires. It was also useful for car fires in parking garages.
    Unfortunately, the design of the new platform doesn't allow room for the handlines.

    Using the aerial as a standpipe is a real option when use have a building without standpipes or with faulty/inadequate ones.

  7. #7
    ADSN/WFLD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    You have spent over 1/2 million dollars for a ladder and you want to use it as a standpipe? With the ladder used this way you have taken up part of the front of the building. What would you do if a firefighter or civilian appeared in a window and needs rescue? You can't move the ladder because the line is attached to it.

    Also what if you see signs of an imminent collapse? Again the ladder is attached to the building and can't be moved immediately.

    The same goes for electric lines. They don't belong attached to the bucket. Stretch whatever you need from the ground and leave the ladder for access and rescue.

  8. #8
    Lewdog
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Why bother tying up an aerial truck or humping all that line up several flights of stairs. If the FD connection is "out-of-service, you could easily run a supply line with a double female and hook into the first floor standpipe discharge outlet. That would supply a standpipe system just as easily and it's less work, although you'll only be able to supply not more than maybe 2 attack lines.

    ------------------
    "I'll retire when they pry the hose from my cold, dead fingers!"

    [This message has been edited by Lewdog (edited 01-27-2001).]

  9. #9
    ENG92INE
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Wink

    It does have its purposes in a last ditch effort position but that is it, you don't want to commit your truck to this job unless you absolutley must ... then you have to take chances and make some important decisions ... Ryan

    ------------------
    Fishers FD
    Fishers, IN
    Local 416

  10. #10
    oldE6man
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Thought about it once as an option (from the Tower Ladder), but decided to use the bucket of the TL to transport manpower and equipment to the fire floor instead. It probably made fifty trips up and down, which saved the troops a huge amount of fatigue.

    In this instance, we dropped a 2 1/2" handline out a window (5th floor), connected it to a similar line that had been stretched to the ground below the window, and used that line with a gated wye to provide two attack lines. Worked well.

  11. #11
    Captain Gonzo
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    While we have never used the aerial as a standpipe in fire operations, I can see it being used as such if the situation warrants it. You can always request another aerial from your department if you have it or a mutual aid ladder company.

    It's just another tool in our firefighting arsenal!

    ------------------
    Firefighters: rising to accept the challenge!
    Captain Gonzo

  12. #12
    DOG 4035
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    This is a good option if the standpipe is OOS. It saves time and effort. Just think if you had to hump the hose 75' to 100' up a stairway. Remember we have to put water on the fire. A handline put into use ASAP saves lives.
    What we do most of the time is to use a bottle stretch. It's fast and saves time.

    ------------------
    "It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog." STAY SAFE-STAY LOW

    [This message has been edited by DOG 4035 (edited 03-29-2001).]

  13. #13
    INDY FIRE
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    Here in Indy we have in the past used aerial ladders as stand pipes with great success. It gets water on the fire alot quicker. If you are not plucking people out of windows then why not take advantage of it, especially if the stand pipes are out of service. If we use a ladder as a stand pipe, we just call for another ladder to take its place. It's not Rocket Science, you do what you have to do to get the job done......

    BE SAFE!

  14. #14
    51Truck_K
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    While I am not a big advocate of the stand pipe idea, I can see where it may come in handy.....HOWEVER, I believe the controls for the flow of water should remain at the turntable with the LCC. This erases, or at least should, the possibility of the ladder being retracted or bedded with a full waterway, resulting in a catostrophic failure of the pipe system. And that my freinds, is Bad.

  15. #15
    DSmits
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We used our tower recently at the large fire in Lansing IL that was on the firehouse page as a feature. It was very useful for overhaul in the later stages. You wont see it often but it may happen

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts