Thread: Forcible Entry

  1. #1
    Stone Cold Firefighter
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool Forcible Entry

    I must say that Forcible Entry is one of my favorite classes. i was wondering if anyone have their own unusal techniques that you didnt learn in class. i'd love to hear them.

  2. #2
    LHS*
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    How about a cordless drill, 3/16 bit and a 1/4 inch piece of bent wire to open all panic hardware doors in the community??

    Or a garage door hook to open rollup door from the outside.

    A fallon or rattlesnake hook that will act as a pike pole, ax, 5 foot pry bar and pull all deadbolts and door knob locks.

  3. #3
    LadderCapp
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    For residences with automatic garage doors, take out the center two panes, or panels on the top row of the door with axe, halligan, sledge, or your toy of choice. pull the release rope and raise the door! I've seen too many people spend 5 minutes scrapping a garage door for entry and creating a tripping hazard at your entrance point.
    For steel frame doors, take a K-12 saw or like instrument and cut the hinges off from the outside if exposed, or run the blade down the hinge side as deep as it will go into the gap between the door and frame. You'll like either.

  4. #4
    DD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    What kind of bend is made on the wire?

    How hard is it to push a 1/4" wire into a 3/16" hole?


  5. #5
    LHS*
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    The bend! The best part is, ity takes less than 15 seconds to open a steel frame door or garage door and you can lock up when you are done, in fact no one will know you were inside.

    xxxxxx
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  6. #6
    Smokeetr4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    On comercial occupancy aluminum doors with tempered glass, simply lock a vice grip on the lock cylinder and rotate it counter-clockwise. This will shear the weak pins in the cylinder allowing you to "unscrew the cylinder from the door". After the cylinder has been removed, simply rotate the locks cam with a key tool to open the door. When you are done investigating, simply screw the cylinder back into the door!. Much better than breaking that expensive glass or trying to get under that unmovable interior pushbar on a smells and bells.

  7. #7
    Captain Gonzo
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Forcible entry can be a fun and challenging endeavor, but I would rather use the keys in the Knox Box to gain access to a commercial/industrial structure. We once had an occupant in a fairly new strip mall who refused to give us a key for the knox box. We explained that the keys are on the rigs and that it is much easier to gain entry with the key than having to force a door or pop a window. He said he did not care...

    A few nights later, we responded to a a fire alarm activation at the strip mall, the zone ws this person's store. Looking through the window, we saw a light haze of smoke in the rear of the store. We went to the back and using the irons forced the metal door open to gain access. A coffee pot had been left on from closing time and the plastic handle and lid of the pot had melted onto the warming element, causing the smoke. We had fire alarm call the store owner, who came down and asked why we had to force his door....if only he had given us a key for knox box, it would have been a lot less costly!

    ------------------
    Firefighters: Today's heroes protecting everyone's tomorrows!
    Captain Gonzo

  8. #8
    Plug Ugly
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Irons rule.
    Anyone ever use the Detroit door opener or the P & Q door opener? They both work on the leverage principle to force doors inward.

  9. #9
    FireLt1951
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Originally posted by Plug Ugly:
    Irons rule.
    Anyone ever use the Detroit door opener or the P & Q door opener? They both work on the leverage principle to force doors inward.
    Here in Detroit we have always had a serious situation with barred doors and windows. Because of this, we had an Engine Operator invent what he called the Detroit Ripper. This turned out to be one of the best forcible entry tools for barred windows and doors that I had ever seen or used. This is one fantastic tool for a lot of urban departments or cities where they have many barred homes.


  10. #10
    AVF&R452
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    LT,

    Please tell us more about the "Detroit Ripper". Sounds like a great tool.

    Thanks,

    Jim

  11. #11
    FireLt1951
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Originally posted by AVF&R452:
    LT,

    Please tell us more about the "Detroit Ripper". Sounds like a great tool.

    Thanks,

    Jim
    Little hard to explain without a picture but I'll try. The Ripper has a heavy gage square steel handle about 5' long, welded to this handle is a heavy gage steel plate that is formed into a U shape. On this U shaped plate are two smaller heavy gaged steel attachements for a chain. You put the chain through the bars and attach to the side attachments and pry outward. The leverage is outstanding and has never failed to rip the bars from the windows or doors. Takes a lot less effort than other prying methods. I'll get a picture of it and e-mail it to you if you want.



    [This message has been edited by FireLt1951 (edited 05-23-2001).]

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