1. #1
    CaptCo7
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Hi-Rise and Standpipe Packs??

    Please describe how your pack is made up, such as hose size, nozzle, tools etc.

    Thanks!

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  2. #2
    JohnM
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    We use the Manhattan high rise bag, made by the Clements Company I believe. I think it is a good bag. It carries 100' of 1 3/4", but I think 150' will fit. It also has a 2 1/2 X 1 1/2 gated wye. The second guy carries the follow in bag, w/50' of 1 3/4", spanners, pipe wrench. We use Akron automatic nozzles. I have severe heartburn with an auto nozzle in a high rise pack, and would want a 15/16" s/b nozzle. I would also want a total of 200' of line, not the 150' we carry. But the 2 bags we carry are some good hardware.

  3. #3
    chiefjay4
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    150' of 2 1/2 with a smoothbore nozzle(1 1/8 tip) You can never count on getting enough pressure for a fog nozzle. And please under no circumstances use a "automatic" nozzle. Testing shows that since these nozzle have good streams at low flow rates(maybe 50 gpm), they shouldnt be used in this application.

  4. #4
    mfgentili
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    Because we never found one that really worked well, my engine company just got rid of our canvas high rise bag and started using three separate 50' lengths of 1 3/4" hose bundled accordian style and carried on the backs of firefighters on top of their SCBA cylinder or over a shoulder. I prefer over the cylinder because it keeps both hands free to carry other needed equipment.

    We carry the nozzles, wyes, wedges, spanners, wrenches, reducers etc. in a 5 gal. bucket equipped with one of those "Bucket Buddy" tool pouches. This has proven very durable and it is easy to quickly find what you need. A 2 1/2 gallon PW extinguisher and forcilble entry tools are also carried.

    All of this equipment is easily carried by 2 or 3 firefighters depending on available manpower. If only two are available for immediate entry, one carries two lengths of hose and the bucket while the other carries one length, a forcible entry tool, and the extinguisher.

    ------------------
    Mike Gentili, Capt.
    New Bedford Fire Dept.

    [This message has been edited by mfgentili (edited 06-16-2001).]

  5. #5
    engine1321
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    In my town we don't use a gated wye IN the stand pipe pack. It's attached to the leader line. This allows us to get 150' of 1 1/2 hose into a rather small bag. The gated wye for a standpipe comes off the engine. The nozzle being used in the pack is a task force tip fog nozzle. I don't believe it to be an automatic.

  6. #6
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    We presently use 100 ft of 1 3/4" with gated wye and a "high rise nozzle" 100 GPM at 75 PSI> It is carried in a strap contraption and we are evaluating going to a bag.
    Matthew D. Lutz
    Training Officer
    East Moline Fire Dept.
    email: emtraining@aol.com

  7. #7
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    4 out of 5 responses, so far, are carrying 1 1/2 or 1 3/4" lines. Chiefjay4 mentions not using fog because you may be operating with house pressures to start your operation. Friction loss in these small diameter hoses must also be factored in.

    We use 2 1/2" (3 to 4 lengths) and a 1 1/8" solid bore for all standpipe operations. My department did nemerous tests using 1 3/4" utilizing various house pressures and found the final flow inadequate.

    another $0.02

  8. #8
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    We carry 200' of "lightweight" 2 1/2 with a 1 1/8" tip; it's bundled in 50' sections for hanging on your SCBA and has a small bag carrying the nozzle, a 2 1/2" gated wye and spanners. (Like Mike Gentili, we never had much luck with the bags we used (to have) that carried it ALL... too bulky, awkward, etc. and went to the accordion style load that we learned from Denver FD "in another mag")

    We used to use 1 3/4" line w/a fog until we realized the problems with PRV's in the standpipes. I gotta agree w/ChiefJay and E229lt about the efficacy of 1 3/4 and fogs... it might pay to investigate the flows in your buildings....
    Watch yer topknots,
    Led

  9. #9
    GBordas
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    The standpipe kit that we carry on our pumper consists of:

    - 2-1/2-inch controlling nozzle with a 1-1/8- inch MST and a 1/2-inch outer stream tip.
    - Hand Control Wheel for outlet valve.
    - 2-1/2" X 2-1/2" In-line pressure gauge.
    - 18" Pipe Wrench.
    - Set of Spanner Wrenches.
    - 4 Door Chocks (Wedges).
    - 3 or 4 lengths of 2-1/2-inch hose.

    The In-line pressure gauge is used to ensure correct nozzle pressure and a good fire stream. Nozzle pressure is controlled at the hand wheel by opening or closing the valve at the outlet not by controlling at the pump. (80psi is required at outlet.)

    To supply the standpipe system, two 3-1/2" lines are connected to the standpipe connection from the pumper.

    [ 08-29-2001: Message edited by: GBordas ]

  10. #10
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    Hey, the 2 1/2" looks like the way to go, has anyone tried any testing with 2" and smoothbore tips? We to are looking at putting together high rise kit for some new buildings in our area.
    Firefighter/NREMT-P/Public Safety Diver
    May we ride into the darkness only to return as safe as we started!!

  11. #11
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    We currently carry a 2" attack line with a 1" tip. It should work well for a standpipe though. Let us know the results

  12. #12
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    I'm not sure if we have any high-rise packs that are assembled the same. Everyone has their favorite way of making them. Sad, I know. I have tried everything, all of the fancy bags, backpacks, straps, and hose. I believe 150' of 1.75 in a doubled triple layer to be most productive. The smooth bore nozzel is by far my favorite and a gated wye on the other end. All of this depends on your area. Maybe 200', Maybe less. Maybe 50' of 3" before the handline. Check your buildings for your range. The triple layer unfolds great. The smooth bore requires less pressure and are less apt to clog from debris. Happy Hunting. Stay Safe All!

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