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  1. #1
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    Default Lightweight truss roof vent

    Ok gang, lets hear your opinions! You arrive on scene and find a two story residential structure with the rear of the second floor fully involved. You know from the area pre-plan that these houses have lightweight peak truss roofs. Would you vent the roof with a crew and saw ?. If not, how would you accomplish venting the structure? You're the IC, you have a full engine company (4) and a truck enroute from the next due district.
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  2. #2
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    When I hear fully involved, the first thing that comes to mind is, it's already vented. If it's a working fire that hasn't vented, we would use horizontal venting, if the truck is on scene to do it. The rest of the truck would, assuming we have no life hazard, start pulling ceiling and walls to expose any extension. This is a common fire in my area, and we attack them aggressively. The key is having the proper training, and "knowing your area". I realize this is a trick question, with a lot of variables coming into play, but the short and sweet of it is, our job is to put out fire, and it's a dangerous job. My department takes the stance that we don't like to talk the fire out, we'll beat it out.

    this is my personal opinion and not that of my department

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber jsdobson's Avatar
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    I agree with efdcapte1 and would use horizontal ventilation.

    The majority of our housing is light weight construction, residential and commercial, and would be very concerned with the possibility of flame inpingment on the light weight trusses. Gusset plate failure leading to roof collapse has occured in less than 10 minutes of flame inpingment.

    If I saw flames in or near the cockloft, I'd be very cautious about how long I worked in the upper stories of the structure in question.

    Good thought provoking question. Hope more respond.

    BE SAFE
    Before Everything, Stop And First Evaluate.
    BE SAFE
    Before Everything, Stop And First Evaluate

  4. #4
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    Okay, second floor's fully involved, how is the attic? Do you have flames pushing out the eaves? What is the life safety hazard? Are all of the occupants out?
    I'm all for aggresive interior attacks, not necesarily in this case. If everyone is out and I have ANY sign that there is fire in the attic I'm not putting my guys (or me) on the roof. I've seen truss roofs collapse with guys on them. You don't have time to react. Everybody got out OK at that job (with some MAJOR pucker factor). It ain't gonna happen on my watch!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Dalmatian90's Avatar
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    w/o signs of fire in the attic, 1st priority is fire attack w/ horizontal ventilation. Knock it out before it gets established in the attic.

    Depending on manpower and how quickly a knock down is occuring, a vertical vent may also be appropriate, preferably on or tethered to an aerial. The roof vent gives a place for heat & flame to go if the fire gets into the attic -- that's less heat and fewer trusses exposed then leaving it unvented and have the heat & fire mushroom in a closed attic.
    IACOJ Canine Officer
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  6. #6
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    helena, MT, USA
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    We are big believers in positive pressure ventilation and staying off the roof. There are good times to go to the roof but on most homes with light weight truss construction there is NOT. I have had the privilage to visit with Steve Storment an Asst. Chief with Phoenix about roof ventilation and the testing they did on it. He showed some videos of the testing and it is amazing how fast the roof will go with direct flame. He also showed us the video that most have probably seen of 4 Phoenix FF's going through. OH Boy! He made the comment, "By the time I retire, it is my goal to see to it that no one on PFD goes to the roof of a structure with light weight truss construction." That's how serious he is about it.

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