Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: Hoods

  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber TLFD40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    148

    Question Hoods

    Does anybody know what kind of hoods the FDNY uses? What type do you use? I have seen many specials on the FDNY lately and noticed the ease of putting on the hoods they wear and they look really comfortable
    BE ALERT AND STAY ALIVE
    ASST CHIEF
    TLVFD, NY


  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Ghetto, NY
    Posts
    59

    Post

    Morning Pride vented top hoods. Not a fan of hoods.
    FTM - PTB

  3. #3
    GBordas
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    They are the Morning Pride PBI ventilated hoods. I agree with 51Truck, I am not a fan of hoods either.

    Stay safe Brothers.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber TLFD40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    148

    Post

    So are you saying you don't wear them or you wear them but don't like them? Now that i think about it, i don't like them either, but they sure are warm at 3 in the morning during a chimney fire up here. I was just looking for a more comfortable one to wear.
    BE ALERT AND STAY ALIVE
    ASST CHIEF
    TLVFD, NY

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    72

    Talking

    This hood is a thin material but will keep you toasty in the street or up in the bucket. Trucky's just don't like to be totally encapsulated crawling around the fire apartment. There good for pushing in a line.. <br />WARE YOUR HOODS BOYS...

    STAY LOW -STAY SAFE

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    41

    Post

    Morning brothers,<br />Sometimes you can't pass on a topic to jump in on and hoods are just one of them. <br />1. No one ever said that an Interior Operating Firefighter at a structure fire had a right to be comfortable - especially for a good truck (laugh here is needed)<br />2. I wish they had them in my day (I am old) I would have worn anything that allowed me to search another foot forward before backing out for the engine to take over.<br />3. Remember ears tell you nothing. If you want to find flashover probability or exponential heat buildup take a glove off. My friend, "No Ears Norman!" would have another nickname if we had hoods in 'those' days.<br />Happy New Year - be safer and get happy again soon.

    [ 01-06-2002: Message edited by: 111truck ]</p>

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    72

    Post

    Hey 111 might as well keep topic going. <br />I had a friend also " No Fingers Franky",He<br />is still trying to figure out how to wipe<br />his *** with his ears. Im laughing...<br />I bet Norman was one hell of a nozzle man..

    Luv To All

    STAY LOW -STAY SAFE

  8. #8
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Houston area
    Posts
    106

    Post

    Two of the departments I work for issue Reed hoods. In my full time job, that's all that's issued. For those of you that aren't familiar with them, the Reed was designed by a captain in Houston, that is built like bunker gear, with a PBI outer shell with a liner like in most bunker gear. Definitely keeps you from burning, but according to the instructions it's to be worn over your coat. This leaves some space that could potetially allow for steam and heat to find a crack to get to your neck or ears. So, I usually like to throw a nomex sock hood under my coat for a little extra protection. I know some of you are going to say that you need to be able to feel heat to be more fully aware of your surroundings, so go ahead. I would rather just not burn myself. A lot of folks that use the Reed also wear extra sweatshirts under their gear just to get in a little further. That seems a little extreme to me, and will probably get responses about how if it's that hot, you shouldn't be in that far, so go ahead and say your piece, but it's a great piece of PPE if you are looking to get to the seat of the fire without getting too uncomfortable.
    These are my opinions and not those of the organizations for which I work and/or volunteer.

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    540

    Post

    I hate hoods myself. But, If you have ears like me you pretty much need it.
    Proud to be IACOJ Illinois Chapter--Deemed "Crustworthy" Jan, 2003

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber gfdtrk4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The southern shore of beautiful Lake Michigan
    Posts
    250

    Question

    Wow.....

    I'm (almost) speachless!

    I don't like wearing pants...but I have to.

    I HATE wearing a helmet.....It makes it hard to tell when stuff is falling on your head! <img src="eek.gif" border="0">
    FTM-PTB
    trk4

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    87

    Post

    I hear that rule in the FDNY is that the hoods have to be around your neck at every call, but wether or not they are over your head is your decision, but you wont be covered for injury if lets say you catch an ember or a steam burn to your ears etc. Personally I rather have it around my neck keeping me warm, then waste time putting it on when i get to the scene. So you take it off at the false alarm and the chief's are happy to see you wearing them. The hood is great to keep crap from falling down your coat during overhaul.
    " truck till the casket drops "

    www.lynbrookfd.org

    My views and opinions do not represent the views and standards of the Department or Company that I belong to.

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    15

    Post

    I guess this subject is as open to opinion as that of 3/4's v/s pants, smoothe-bore v/s fog,<br />leather v/s tupperware, etc...So,I'll throw out<br />a few musings on the subject of hoods as well.<br />You can get that extra foot or more in the searches,but you may & will still get burned, just<br />not as severe as w/out.On the tip or in the vicinity it does help when all the crap is flying,<br />however some of the debris WILL burn thru the hood.On the roof, nothing more then a pain in the<br />a..,but, should ya go thru a weak spot you'll wish<br />it was fully on. A good cockloft fire w/the tar,<br />paint, etc. raining down like a waterfall it's <br />great (those pot-hole sized tar patches really<br />hurt like Hell when they remove them @the ER).<br />And, of course for whatever reason you should find<br />yourself in a actual or near flash-over situation<br />it may/will give that moment or two to save your<br />partner &/or yourselfs' ***! The hood does in my<br />opinion (& experience)greatly increase your body<br />temprature, allowing overheating & fatigue to set<br />in much faster then any of us would desire.<br />I guess, unfortunately there are no hard & fast <br />rules w/hoods, the pro's & con's are as much equal as are the opinions of those that must wear them! Personally, it comes down to 1st&2nd* v/s 3rd* burns, & having had each WITH &W/OUT the hood, I guess it falls upon the choice of the<br />wearer(&Dept.SOPs/Work-Comp.).<br />The TWO MOST IMPORTANT THINGS:<br />1.Keep'em DRY!Always have a couple of extra ones<br /> on the rig w/ya (in your bag w/extra socks,<br /> t's,sweats,gloves,etc.), especially if your w/a<br /> Co. that goes from job to job. Otherwise you'll<br /> end up like a nice Maine lobster!<br />2.Keep'm LOOSE! Stretch them out a bit so there is<br /> some air pockets for heat disapation,when they<br /> are too tight against your skin you may as well<br /> not even have it on. If ya don't believe that,<br /> try this:ask rookie to stick his hand in a hot<br /> broiler w/the hood wrapped tightly (single<br /> layer)around the hand-pretty damn hot! Remove<br /> his hand & show him the sink. Now, wrap your<br /> your hand loosely with the hood & your hand will<br /> not be burned (or as bad as the FNG's)! I think<br /> this is why alot of guy's end up not liking <br /> them, because they are on too tight & literally<br /> like a second skin & end up getting burned,&<br /> have to ask yourself "What's the point?" Keep<br /> them LOOSE! Plus, when it's down around your<br /> neck you won't feel like it's choking ya.

    Just my 97-cents short of a $1.oo worth of BS.

    "Be safe & enjoy it while ya got it!"

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Beaufort SC
    Posts
    62

    Post

    I am always on the lookout for the new and better firefighting equipment, and my latest find was the carbon hood. It is so much more comfortable than nomex or PBI plus you stay cooler. Too bad they don't make bunkers out of it (yet).
    When the defecation hits the oscillation I'll be there.

  14. #14
    Early Adopter cozmosis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    1,921

    Post

    [quote]Originally posted by Ladder41OVM:<br /><strong>They are the Morning Pride PBI ventilated hoods. I agree with 51Truck, I am not a fan of hoods either.</strong><hr></blockquote>

    I saw a program the other day where the guys on an FDNY rescue company were wearing black hoods. The only black hoods I've ever seen are the new carbon ones. You can get PBI hoods in black?

    I may not be a fan of the hood... But I'm a fan of my ears and the skin that covers them. <img src="smile.gif" border="0">

  15. #15
    GBordas
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Coz,

    Not all of the firemen have these black hoods. I have seen some red ones floating around. As far as the black, I know that the newer helmets have black earflaps instead of yellow (maybe that's what you saw) If not then my guess is that these were purchased by the individual or are being evaluated by R&D.

    To All:<br />The FDNY did an extensive hood study that was published in WNYF a year to two ago. The results might suprise you. The reasearch concluded that a dry hood didn't provide much more protection than without in temperatures over 200F. It gave you only a second or two added to what they called TTP (Time to pain) On the other hand, a saturated hood (either from water or sweat) proved to provide greater protection and had a longer TTP. The condidition used for this test demonstrated TTP at different temperatures. And after a certain point (temperature) the hood was insignificant to preventing burns. In other words, it didn't make a difference whether you had one on or not! Hoods work the best up to about 200 degrees farenheight(SP) Anything more than that is risky as far as protection.

    For what it's worth fellas, Beacause you wear hood doesn't necessarily mean you are better protected from the higher temps in a room. To protect yourselves, along with your hood, you should also pull your earflaps down and your collar up. I admit, I don't pull my hood up all the time. I wear around my neck mostly. But I do always pull my earflaps down from my helmet and make sure that my collar is up. This will give you the best protection for your ears and back of neck.

    For those of you who think that you are safer and can push yourselves further into a building, I think you're crazy. I think that is why a lot of guys on the job still rely on their basic sense of touch whether it be using your ears or exposing your wrist to determine when it is too hot. Know your limits and be aware of your surroundings!

    To go off on a bit of a tangent: Because today's combustibles burn hotter and interior firefighting is hotter and tougher on "today's firefighter", I can't stress how important it is for you to have a ventilation team breaking windows and cutting the roof to remove the excess heat to prevent firefighter burns. (Not just because I am an OV.

    Stay safe brothers, and sisters too.

    GB

    [ 01-18-2002: Message edited by: Ladder41OVM ]</p>

  16. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    19

    Post

    I'm not going to get into how rediculous I think it is to expose skin in a fire or other hazerdous atmosphere. Might as well remove your SCBA to see what kind of smoke is present. As far as hoods, I work for the Houston FD and we wear the Reed Hood developed by Capt. Reed. He has also developed gloves that help us in our jobs. I believe Morning Pride sell both products. I feel a firefighter should be aware of his surroundings at all times. These "tools" allow us to stay "cooler" mentally and think about what we are doing. This is sometimes hard to do when you are trying to put yor ears out or your helmet flaps down. The hood was designed to be worn under your coat, despite what the label says.<br />This is just how we operate and it may not be for all, but most departments around her use this "Reed Hood" and his gloves.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Sugar Land, Texas
    Posts
    31

    Thumbs up

    DownTownHeat- I couldnt agree with you anymore. <br /> Here in Sugar Land the higher ups FINALLY cut the purchase order to outfit all suppression personell with the "Reed Hood". The next PO is hopefully for the gloves, paying them out of my pocket is kinda expensive. The hood and gloves are not cheap, but a price to pay for protection. I have been using the "Reed Hood" for 12 years and have yet to recieve any burns. I also wear a single ply sock underneath just in the case there is a opening around the mask. Just a little correction. Morning Pride sells the Sleevemate Gloves. The "Reed Hood" is made by Globe and sold through Casco Industries.

    "Reed Hood, Dont Leave The Station WITHOUT It!"

    Everyone Be Safe<br />Jerremy Brown

  18. #18
    Senior Member FFMcDonald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    N 41* 2.770' W 74* 7.338'
    Posts
    272

    Default

    Curious to know who makes the new 'Carbon' hoods that cozmosis mentioned, the only black, or dark navy colored hoods that I have seen worn, have been by the FDNY.

    Question: is the Morning Pride ventilated hood any better? Does it actually help relieve some of the heat? I don't know - and am asking those of you that use them.

    Also - DownTown Heat, Globe makes the Reed Hood, but I think that Morning Pride makes the gloves that you are speaking about, I am pretty sure that they are the turnout gear supplier for Houston.

    Here's a link for more about the Reed Hood.

    http://www.globefiresuits.com/data/p...dreedhood.html
    Marc

    "In Omnia Paratus"

    Member - IACOJ
    "Got Crust?"

    -- The opinions presented here are my own; and are not those of any organization that I belong to, or work for.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    482

    Default

    Hoods are another tool for the firefighter to use to avoid thermal damage to the body. I used to feel that I needed the tips of my ears to gauge temp. changes but when ears are scolded you learn that the hood is vital.

    I have never worn a reed hood, though it sounds interesting. Anyone got a picture or a good description.

  20. #20
    Senior Member FFMcDonald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    N 41* 2.770' W 74* 7.338'
    Posts
    272

    Default

    Box Alarm --- Check out Globes website .. http://www.globefiresuits.com

    Direct link to their 'other products' page : http://www.globefiresuits.com/globe....Other.Products

    As far as a picture -- http://www.globefiresuits.com/data/p...dreedhood.html
    Marc

    "In Omnia Paratus"

    Member - IACOJ
    "Got Crust?"

    -- The opinions presented here are my own; and are not those of any organization that I belong to, or work for.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts