Thread: Tire Fire

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    Post Tire Fire

    What have you had the best results with when fighting a tire fire. around 300 tires.<br />I have heard many tactics.

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    Lots of foam!!!!!!!

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    John_Ford
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    Big Bulldozer. Lots a dirt. <img src="wink.gif" border="0">

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    at hagersville they used CL215 water bombers

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    NorfolkFire - Where is Hagersville and what is a CL215 water bomber?

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    GPM, <br />Follow your name <img src="smile.gif" border="0">

    We had no problem extinguishing 150 tires with plain water at a flow rate of 250-gpm and did so in less than 2 minutes.

    This test was done with the California Deputy Fire Marshal, Rodney Slauter.

    Numerous other tests confirmed that adequate flow rates are essential.

    One test using Fuel Busters at a flow rate of 95-gpm was unable to exinguish a 1500 tire-tire fire yet when attacked with plain water at 250-gpm extinguishment was accomplished.

    Hope this helps.
    Kirk Allen
    First Strike Technologies, Inc

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    300 Tires isn't *that* many...I'm sure many of us have repair shops in our district with a pile of used tires that big piled up behind the building.

    If it's in town and near exposures, blast the snot out of it to knock it down (deck gun?) then follow up with handlines to overhaul. Class A or B during overhaul will probably help.

    This may also add up to a notification to DEP Haz-Mat for their advise...burning tires can produce quite amount of liquid and may neccessitate a haz-mat contractor to clean up soil. Of course, letting the property owner know no matter how much it costs to dispose of a tire, the haz-mat cleanup bill after a fire would be much, much more might help avert the problem!
    IACOJ Canine Officer
    20/50

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    Having been in one of the biggest tire fires in the US. I can tell you that 300 isnt that many! I have seen just about everything tried and failed. It would depend on several factors but if you can bury it, that is the only way to go. OF course we are talking about tire mountains here not just mole hills.

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    We have had several tire fyres here in the UK over the past five years that have burned for several days, despite copious amounts of regular foam and water. I have seen Bio-Ex Class A (URBAN) foams outperform water on small (20) tire fyre tests. However, no real answers here.

    Kirk - what were the pre-burn times in those tire tests and also - what is 'fuel-busters'?? Some additive I guess.........

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    Take Note: -

    "During high burn rates, more than 50 potentially harmful organic compounds can be identified in test burn emissions. Most of the compounds are aliphatically, olefinically, or acetylenically substituted aromatics. Cyclic and chained alkanes, alkenes, dienes, as well as sulfonated, nitrogenated compounds, thiophene, substituted thiophenes, isocynobenzene, and bensodiazine are also identified." This EPA study showed reasonable agreement with compounds that were identified in actual plume samples. "In general, elevated levels of CO particulates, carbon, zinc, benzene, touene, zylene, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons are measured. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons may include napthaline, benzo(a)pyrene, crysene, fluorene, anthracene, and phenanthrene. Metals in plumes consist primarily of lead, iron, and zinc."

    Guidelines reports that "Studies of tire fires have identified the emission of significant quantities of benzo(a)pyrene, a reported carcinogen, and high emissions of other noxious compounds, particularly benzene (another known carcinogen), with concentrations often exceeding 1 part per million (ppm).

    Good links for information at <a href="http://www.usfa.fema.gov/usfapubs/tirefirerep.htm" target="_blank">http://www.usfa.fema.gov/usfapubs/tirefirerep.htm</a> <br />and<br /><a href="http://www.netfeed.com/~jhill/tirefire.htm" target="_blank">http://www.netfeed.com/~jhill/tirefire.htm</a>

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    Paul,<br />The pre-burns were 5-15 minutes depending on which test. 15 was the 1500 tire fire.

    The purpose of the testing was to determine the best storage configuration of tires, ie. shredded, cut, whole etc.

    We found, and proved that 1500 tires was the upper limit for a PROGRESSIVE engine crew to be able to control with tank water (1000 gallons)

    This test showed that a single handline could knock down the fire and control any spread to other areas. Upon bringing under control all were satisfied that more help would normally be on hand in the time frame it took to bring the fire undercontrol.

    Normal overhaul was needed of course <img src="smile.gif" border="0">

    What is Fuel Busters......? Great question! I will shoot you an email <img src="smile.gif" border="0">
    Kirk Allen
    First Strike Technologies, Inc

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    fireman077, hagersville is south of hamilton ontario on hwy # 6, they had a god tire fire there a while ago, a CL215 (hope the numbers are right) is a ministry of natural resources twin engine water bomber, i wasn't at the fire lived elsewhere at the time) but through the videos have found out that the bombers were needed to get sufficient penetration of water/foam into the tire piles, i guess it was too hot to go in and pull the tires apart, so they atttacked it from above, apparently worked well, yes...overkill for the fire in the topic but just a thought

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    Talking

    [quote] This may also add up to a notification to DEP Haz-Mat for their advise...burning tires can produce quite amount of liquid and may neccessitate a haz-mat contractor to clean up soil. Of course, letting the property owner know no matter how much it costs to dispose of a tire, the haz-mat cleanup bill after a fire would be much, much more might help avert the problem! <hr></blockquote>

    Could not agree more Dlamation! Tire fires have always been a problem for the fire service and with the use of automobiles climbing each year, the disposal problem will only become more worse. The fire department has to put the fire out but "lighting" a fire under the posterior of the owner of the dump/garage/etc. is a good idea.

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    I have only been to one big tire fire, about 20 years ago. It was big to me anyway, around an acre and piled 20 feet high. The hardest parts were getting access through the zillion junk cards and trying to contain the contaminated runoff water.

    300 tires should be fairly easy to extinguish with a heavy stream or foam.

    Removal of unburned tires to break the fuel side of the pentahedron (tetrahedron + chief) is a good practice.

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    Where are they?Hate to say it but sometimes if the conditions are right crank up the ppv's and let 'em burn.A> they won't be a hazard if destroyed,B> won't be any comtaminated runoff,C requires minimal crew to supervise.Now I know there's a downside to all the above,but I think you need to weigh the options on any incident as to available resources and benefit/loss ratios.Have fun be safe! T.C.

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    Lightbulb

    Water, foam, & soap. Had a piles of shredded tires 80 ft. tall and probably 300 ft across at the bottom, with a building in the middle of it. Used 2 5" lines from nearby river for 2 days, all the foam we could find, and also all the liquid dishwashing detergent and laundry soap we could find. We also cut the fire off with track excavators to stop the fire spread. Building was a total loss, we were on scene for 4 days... 22 fire departments on scene, 165 firefighters, no injuries!
    Also drained used 192 tankers loads of water over first 12 hours.

    Hope this helps.

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