1. #26
    LMRCap1
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Our department use to contract to Milan Dragway in MI. We would only do the big races though and whenever they had jet cars and alcohal cars running. What a differant experiance. I also used to work for the private ambulance service that covered Flat Rock speedway which contracted their fire service to a track safety company. Both were fun to work but still enjoy sitting in the stands watching the action.

    Les Hartford
    Maybee, MI

  2. #27
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    What specific topics do you feel should be included in a motorsports ff/rescue training symposium? Try to be specific. How long should the program be? What are prerequisites?

  3. #28
    Sfrsc4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation

    Well, there are a lot of usfull stuff on the Firefighter 1 test, so that would be a good start. Even some of the "Building Inspections" part of FF1 is a good idea. If you ever walk around the grandstands, or consession stands (as you should) you know what I mean. A working knowledge of Incident Command system is good. Proficency at hand portable fire extinguishers is number one priority. Scene safety, and size up is required. Fuel characteristics is manditory. Knowledge of commercially avalible tools (hand operated) and their safty features, and uses. (Custom built tools need to be covered in house) First responder type EMS protocals should be manditory too, at least good first aid training (CPR-D is part of FF1 cert.). These things are definate manditory training items. I think there are more, but I am sure I am overlooking them due to experiance complacency.

    What I am not sure about is how to mandate training on the vast differences of different classes of cars, and how to properly extricate victims. Staging, and response of rigs needs to be addressed too, but with every track, and even with different events that changes. Most events we work, we are "Self dispatched", so I don't think that a national standard would work there either. I do believe that a spotter (dispatcher) would be helpful in a lot of situations. Most of our crew that don't have two way radios, use scanners, so the OIC can relay orders to personell operating at an incident (going back to IC structure), but some basic hand signals need to be addressed. SCCA has a set of hand signals, and we tried them, but many of those are not used because they aren't applicable to our situations.

    I am going to post this for now, I am going to come back and add more to another reply when I think of more. I sure am looking for help here with this too.

    ------------------
    Roger Ellis, Capt. Speedway Fire/Rescue
    http://speedwayfire.8m.com
    ICQ#: 61722026

  4. #29
    DD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Billy;

    The following is a direct copy &paste from the Indiana Administrative Code.

    655 IAC 1-2.1-65 Motor Sports Emergency Responder
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 65. (a) The minimum training standards for Motor Sports Emergency Responder certification shall be as set out in this section and sections 66 through 74 of this rule.
    (b) The candidate shall have been certified as at least a Firefighter II or First Class Firefighter for one (1) year. (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-65; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402; errata filed Oct 3, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 20 IR 332)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-66 Competitions, arenas, and vehicles
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 66. With respect to competitions, arenas, and vehicles, the candidate shall identify and describe the following:
    (1) Types of motor sports competitions.
    (2) Types of motor sports arenas, including the general requirements for each.
    (3) Types of motor sports vehicles used in competition.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-66; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-67 Emergency protection
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 67. The candidate shall identify and describe the minimum equipment requirements to provide adequate emergency protection at a motor sport event, including the following:
    (1) Fire extinguishment equipment, mechanisms, agents, and proper uses.
    (2) Extrication equipment.
    (3) First responder medical equipment.
    (4) Materials used for safe cleanup of track.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-67; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-68 Physical condition assessment
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 68. With respect to physical condition assessment, the candidate shall be able to:
    (1) quickly assess the driver's physical condition;
    (2) determine if the driver is in any immediate danger;
    (3) assess the driver's level of consciousness and airway patency; and
    (4) support the driver until he or she receives definitive medical care.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-68; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-69 Personal safety
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 69. The candidate shall identify and describe the requirements for personal safety while performing the following:
    (1) Firefighting.
    (2) Motor sports response.
    (3) Extrication.
    (4) Medical evaluation.
    (5) Track cleanup.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-69; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-70 Extrication
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 70. With respect to extrication, the candidate shall explain and perform the extrication and removal of the driver from a variety of common motor sports vehicles. (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-70; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-71 Common fires and fuel sources
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 71. With respect to common motor sports fires and fuel sources, the candidate shall identify and describe the following:
    (1) Common types of motor sports fires.
    (2) Petroleum mixtures or compounds.
    (3) Engine lubricants.
    (4) Manmade compounds.
    (5) Electrical and mechanical ignition sources.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-71; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-72 Safety warning devices and radio communication
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 72. The candidate shall:
    (1) identify and describe visual and audible safety warning devices; and
    (2) explain the proper use of radio communication.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-72; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3403)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-73 Incident command, priorities, and stabilization
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 73. With respect to incident command, priorities, and stabilization, the candidate shall do the following:
    (1) Explain the incident command structure and responsibilities.
    (2) Explain the role of the motor sports responder in the safe operation of any motor sports event.
    (3) Explain safe response to an incident, including the following:
    (A) Evaluate the scene for fire and medical issues.
    (B) Survey of spectator areas for injuries.
    (C) Cleanup of debris.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-73; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3403)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-74 Placement of emergency apparatus; personnel safety
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 74. The candidate shall explain the safe placement of emergency apparatus in a variety of scenarios and necessary safety precautions applicable to working personnel, participants, and spectators. (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-74; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3403)

    I forgot to give the address of the Public Safety Training Institute, it is: http://www.state.in.us/sema/psti.html


    [This message has been edited by DD (edited March 18, 2000).]

  5. #30
    Sfrsc4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Thank you DD. That sure is helpful. It doesn't look like I was too far off the mark trying to remember this on my own.

    ------------------
    Roger Ellis, Capt. Speedway Fire/Rescue
    http://speedwayfire.8m.com
    ICQ#: 61722026

  6. #31
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    I'm asking...Please submit a list of topics that should be included in a motorsports safety/ff/rescue training program.

    Try to be generally specific and include any references you can.

    Later some proposals can be developed for a minimal standard.

  7. #32
    AZEMT
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    I know that in the Phoenix area tracks (Firebird and PIR) the Safety Safaris are from Rural/Metro. I race a 310+mph jet dragster around the country for a living and have met alot of safety crews in the process. Although weve never needed the assistance its nice to know their available if we need it. You can check out our page at WWW.INVADERJET.COM

  8. #33
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question

    Who can provide some contact info. for the Safety Safari folks?

  9. #34
    DD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I think that Al's Emergency 1 is a rapid response vehicle with a warp drive. The jet is for the areas with slower, congested traffic. Look at his invader jet site.

  10. #35
    SCCARESCUE
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Hi everyone! Sorry I have not checked this in a while. Here are some thoughts:

    The committee looking into the need for a standard for motorsport facilities has been busy. The committee is a virtual "who's who" of veteran race track responders and managers. Interests of both sides of the issue - fire and motorsports - are well represented by respected people. However, as with any standard, it will take time to develop and even longer to implement. Rest assured that everyone will have a chance to respond to any proposals they may develop.

    Training is an issue we use at my track. we host a 2 day seminar on safety. In addition, my fire crews have 5 days of live fire/live rescue training BEFORE we hit the track each season. All attend - even the veterans. We use real cars and real fuels and real agents to solve the various problems. Last year we used over 1000 lbs of Purple K in training alone. If you use the agents in training, and train well, with good scenarios, you will use far less agent during the season - as your people will know how to use it, when to use it and how much to use. We use Sodium Bicarb, Purple K, and Cold fire as our main agents. Portland cement is used for metallic fires.

    Rescue equipment for a race track is the same stuff for the street, with a few exceptions: On the track we must deal with new alloys and welding materials, Carbon Fiber, Lexan windshields. There are few "specialized" tools - just stuff you find every day. Dewalt 18v cordless stuff - drills, circ saw and reciprocating saws are very useful. Coarse tooth, short saws are great for fiberglass and carbon fiber. Face masks are needed for carbon fiber cutting.

    enough for now!! I am off to the races in Charlotte - lets get some other guys in here!!

    Dan Martelle

    ------------------
    Dan Martelle

  11. #36
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Thanks Dan for your reply. Who is serving on the committee, and how should they be contacted?

  12. #37
    Ladder Man
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Any new developments guys and gals? It has been a few months since anyone has posted anything here.

  13. #38
    Sfrsc4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Wink

    Sorry, I haven't posted anything in a while either. It has been a busy season, as usuall. We havn't had too many big incidents to critique, nor any new tactics or procedures to try. I am sure that after the season winds down in the next month or two, more will be posted here, and elsewhere.

    ------------------
    Roger Ellis, Capt. Speedway Fire/Rescue
    http://speedwayfire.8m.com
    ICQ#: 61722026

  14. #39
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    Default Nfpa 610

    I do not know if anyone is watching this thread. NFPA 610 a guidline has been out for a couple years and is in the process of bei8ng revised. Chief Jones is no longer chairing the committee but remains on it and very active. The new chair is a firfighter, race car driver and also on a motorsports safety team. We would love to have input from all for improvements. Our biggest dissapointment has been lack of interest since it was published. Presently I serve as secretary of the committee.

  15. #40
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    Virginia Department of Fire Programs offers a program called Motorsports Emergency Response Training (NFPA 610). There are a number of Busch and Nextel tracks in Virginia, and I understand the training is pretty good.

    You can contact the VDFP at www.vafire.com or (804) 371-0220 and see if they can give you some curriculum information, or even schedule taking the class from them. Those people in states nearby very well may be able to travel to take the course.

  16. #41

    Join Date
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    Default Looking for a skeleton or outline of EAP for racetrack

    I am taking a class and must figure out an Emergency Action Plan for a racetrack. I have never been to a racetrack and need some help. My project is the INDY but just an idea. I am taking a homeland security program.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sfrsc4 View Post
    As embarassed as I am to say it, I don't have a written lesson plan to share with anybody. What I can do is share what took place in some of our trainings in the past.
    Haveing as much equipment on hand as possible surly makes for great preparation. This would include fire extinguishers, race cars, junk cars (for cutting, and burning hands on excersizes) race car parts, in particular safety equipment. Seat restraints, steering wheels, and posts, cooling fans (for helmets), helmets to go along with that (that shows how radio wires, and cooling vents are hooked up). With the race car owner/driver/crew person, on the whole race car, they can point out the location of fuel and electrical shut offs. How the driver restraints are operated, including window nets, arm restraints, belts, etc. The more of the different classes of cars you work with, the more informed you can be before the knowledge is needed to be applied.
    Last year, we broke into smaller groups and worked stations for practicing different things. Cordless saws was one station, fire extinguishers was another, extrication, cribbing, EMS, scene safety, size up, IC, rig orientation. Then after all went through all of the stations, we set up scenarios with the two junk cars. During that time, we lit them up and had "crews" go in like it was a real response. That was probably the best training we have had in years.
    This year, we had less new personell, so we went through the stations as one big group, but accomplished just as much. This year we also left out the IC portion of the training, just to show the importance of it.
    One nice thing Speedway Fire/Rescue takes for granted is probably the same as a lot of professional Departments. We have regular crews assigned to the same rigs most of the time. As a Captain, and rig driver, when I have a different member (Probie, or just a substitute) I run them around the rig to re-aquaint them with the tool stowage and inventory at the begining of the shift.
    Like any good fire department, the ability to take knowledge and apply it to a givin situation, is invaluable. Teamwork must be stressed. The Incident Command system must be in place, and practiced. Communication is very important. But Most of all....SAFETY OF THE RESPONDER is never to be forgotten!

    I have posted a brief summary of this years training on our website. Pictures will be on line soon.
    <A HREF="www.speedwayfire.8m.com"> </A>

    ------------------
    Roger Ellis, Capt. Speedway Fire/Rescue http://speedwayfire.8m.com
    ICQ#: 61722026

    [This message has been edited by Sfrsc4 (edited March 12, 2000).]

    [This message has been edited by Sfrsc4 (edited March 12, 2000).]

  17. #42
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    Default Tech Rescue

    Doesn't the Indy Racing League have a traveling team? Anybody have any info about them?

  18. #43
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by techrescue View Post
    Doesn't the Indy Racing League have a traveling team? Anybody have any info about them?
    Yes they do & Yes there is
    http://www.indycar.com/tech/101/safety_team.php
    http://www.indycar.com/pro/101/safety_team.php
    http://www.indycar.com/101/safety_team.php

    Traveling team of 15 persons - having worked NASCAR events before this sounded kinda low so i did more looking.


    It would appear that in IRL - each race team is responsible for their own pit area fire suppression (at least at first).
    http://www.indycar.com/tech/101/pit_stop_rules.php
    Last edited by N2DFire; 03-11-2008 at 09:44 AM.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

  19. #44
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    Default Tech Rescue

    Has anybody here ever worked with them? Sounds like an interesting job.

  20. #45
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    I just retired with 30 years on my department as a Relief Engineer at a California Type 1 & 2 station January 31st here in San Diego. I would love to be involved with a Fire/Rescue team at a track setting. California Speedway is the closest to where I live, but I'm mobil too. Thanks for any responses to this.

    Stephen
    Bajahuskys@yahoo.com

  21. #46
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    NHRA has the Safety Safari. They have a core group of full timers that travel and alot of part timers. You get a schedual in the winter for the next season and select the events you want to work. I usually try and work the races in PA, NJ, and VA and try to get a Vegas race also. They have 4 trucks all Chevy/GMC 3500 duallys. 1 oil down truck with some fire extinguishers, and 3 fire/rescue trucks which have coldfire exitinguisher skid units, plus various other fire extinguishers and equipment. 2 of the trucks have hurst rescue tools.

  22. #47
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    How does one apply for the Safety Safari? It sounds like my kind of operation and I have the freedom to travel right now. Steny

  23. #48
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    I sent an email to the HR department. It's a great time. Being on the starting line when a top fueler launches is earth shaking!

  24. #49
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    Might check out these folks

    http://www.trackrescue.com

    I had looked into applying with them but had too many irons in the fire (still do really) but it sounds like fun.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

  25. #50
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    Default Reviving our local track.

    Looking for specific truck ideas. What do most folks use? What type pump? Types of extinguishers? Any pictures would be great.
    The track Im at uses an older F150 (to small) 4X4 with a 200gal tank with a small pump. We use abc extinguishers, PKP, and water. Im trying to get our track manager to buy some additives to drop in the tanks.

    Our track has been closed for 2 yrs due to an asshat running it poorly. In that time all the equipment sat dormant. It took some effort to get the pumps back operating and had to do some work on the extrication tools.
    Forrest Gregg
    Chief
    Holtville/Slapout
    Fire & Rescue Inc.
    District 10 Director
    AAVFD
    IAFC
    www.holtvilleslapoutfd.org

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