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  1. #21
    DD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Indiana has a Fire Fighter Certification category of Motor Sport Emergency Responder.
    The prerequisite is Fire Fighter II Certification for at least one year. It is authorized by Indiana Code 22-14-2-7 and 655 Indiana Administrative Code 1-2.1-65.


    I picked up a copy of the November/December 1999 issue of the Industrial Fire World Magazine at the FDIC in Indy week before last. It contained an article "Hide In Plain Sight" in which it detailed an overturned tanker fire in Cheshire, UK. The tanker and it's contents of Methanol were burning. The Cheshire Fire Brigade made very good use of thermal imaging, both on the ground and aerial from a chopper. Is anyone using TIC's at race tracks to find Methanol fires?


  2. #22
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question

    Can anyone help me by supplying a copy of the Indiana FF curriculum regarding motorsports?

    Good question about thermal imaging! Sounds like a good idea. Lets hear from those with experience!

  3. #23
    Sfrsc4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    I too would like to see the qualifications for the Motorsports quals. I had volunteered to make some for the State of Iowa, but I have not accomplished that.

    The TIC idea is a great one too. Unfortunatly the cost of a TIC is WAY out of our budget. We use WD-40 sprayed into a suspected fire area to find alcohol fires. I am in the prosses of posting pics on my website, and some of those are alky fires. Check back later in the week, as it is very time consuming to get all of that done right. Thanks.

    ------------------
    Roger Ellis, Capt. Speedway Fire/Rescue
    http://speedwayfire.8m.com
    ICQ#: 61722026

  4. #24
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question

    Does anyone practice using wheeled extinguishers during training? There is some technique required, thus important to train.

    What about the recip saws, will they cut everything you need to cut? What blade do you use?

  5. #25
    Sfrsc4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Red face

    As a matter of fact, we were planning on using the "wheeled" units. The biggest differance is they are semipermantly mounted in the rigs. However, we did not actually use them, since over the winter they were vandilized, and discharged. I just finished recharging 400 pounds of PKP into several of the units, so we were not about to use them again.

    As for the cordless saw, I am not sure which blade we use, since it is different almost every time I get to use it. We haven't found a bad blade yet. There isn't much we have found that can't be cut. I think they are regular commercial demolition blades, 6 or 8 inches, and I am not sure of which pitch. We cut A, B, and C posts, roll bars, doors, windows, pipe, springs, roofs, and even Carbon Fiber with no problems.

    PS, I am still putting the pics on the website of our training. Sorry it is takeing so long.



    ------------------
    Roger Ellis, Capt. Speedway Fire/Rescue
    http://speedwayfire.8m.com
    ICQ#: 61722026

  6. #26
    LMRCap1
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Our department use to contract to Milan Dragway in MI. We would only do the big races though and whenever they had jet cars and alcohal cars running. What a differant experiance. I also used to work for the private ambulance service that covered Flat Rock speedway which contracted their fire service to a track safety company. Both were fun to work but still enjoy sitting in the stands watching the action.

    Les Hartford
    Maybee, MI

  7. #27
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    What specific topics do you feel should be included in a motorsports ff/rescue training symposium? Try to be specific. How long should the program be? What are prerequisites?

  8. #28
    Sfrsc4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation

    Well, there are a lot of usfull stuff on the Firefighter 1 test, so that would be a good start. Even some of the "Building Inspections" part of FF1 is a good idea. If you ever walk around the grandstands, or consession stands (as you should) you know what I mean. A working knowledge of Incident Command system is good. Proficency at hand portable fire extinguishers is number one priority. Scene safety, and size up is required. Fuel characteristics is manditory. Knowledge of commercially avalible tools (hand operated) and their safty features, and uses. (Custom built tools need to be covered in house) First responder type EMS protocals should be manditory too, at least good first aid training (CPR-D is part of FF1 cert.). These things are definate manditory training items. I think there are more, but I am sure I am overlooking them due to experiance complacency.

    What I am not sure about is how to mandate training on the vast differences of different classes of cars, and how to properly extricate victims. Staging, and response of rigs needs to be addressed too, but with every track, and even with different events that changes. Most events we work, we are "Self dispatched", so I don't think that a national standard would work there either. I do believe that a spotter (dispatcher) would be helpful in a lot of situations. Most of our crew that don't have two way radios, use scanners, so the OIC can relay orders to personell operating at an incident (going back to IC structure), but some basic hand signals need to be addressed. SCCA has a set of hand signals, and we tried them, but many of those are not used because they aren't applicable to our situations.

    I am going to post this for now, I am going to come back and add more to another reply when I think of more. I sure am looking for help here with this too.

    ------------------
    Roger Ellis, Capt. Speedway Fire/Rescue
    http://speedwayfire.8m.com
    ICQ#: 61722026

  9. #29
    DD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Billy;

    The following is a direct copy &paste from the Indiana Administrative Code.

    655 IAC 1-2.1-65 Motor Sports Emergency Responder
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 65. (a) The minimum training standards for Motor Sports Emergency Responder certification shall be as set out in this section and sections 66 through 74 of this rule.
    (b) The candidate shall have been certified as at least a Firefighter II or First Class Firefighter for one (1) year. (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-65; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402; errata filed Oct 3, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 20 IR 332)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-66 Competitions, arenas, and vehicles
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 66. With respect to competitions, arenas, and vehicles, the candidate shall identify and describe the following:
    (1) Types of motor sports competitions.
    (2) Types of motor sports arenas, including the general requirements for each.
    (3) Types of motor sports vehicles used in competition.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-66; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-67 Emergency protection
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 67. The candidate shall identify and describe the minimum equipment requirements to provide adequate emergency protection at a motor sport event, including the following:
    (1) Fire extinguishment equipment, mechanisms, agents, and proper uses.
    (2) Extrication equipment.
    (3) First responder medical equipment.
    (4) Materials used for safe cleanup of track.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-67; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-68 Physical condition assessment
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 68. With respect to physical condition assessment, the candidate shall be able to:
    (1) quickly assess the driver's physical condition;
    (2) determine if the driver is in any immediate danger;
    (3) assess the driver's level of consciousness and airway patency; and
    (4) support the driver until he or she receives definitive medical care.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-68; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-69 Personal safety
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 69. The candidate shall identify and describe the requirements for personal safety while performing the following:
    (1) Firefighting.
    (2) Motor sports response.
    (3) Extrication.
    (4) Medical evaluation.
    (5) Track cleanup.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-69; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-70 Extrication
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 70. With respect to extrication, the candidate shall explain and perform the extrication and removal of the driver from a variety of common motor sports vehicles. (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-70; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-71 Common fires and fuel sources
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 71. With respect to common motor sports fires and fuel sources, the candidate shall identify and describe the following:
    (1) Common types of motor sports fires.
    (2) Petroleum mixtures or compounds.
    (3) Engine lubricants.
    (4) Manmade compounds.
    (5) Electrical and mechanical ignition sources.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-71; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3402)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-72 Safety warning devices and radio communication
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 72. The candidate shall:
    (1) identify and describe visual and audible safety warning devices; and
    (2) explain the proper use of radio communication.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-72; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3403)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-73 Incident command, priorities, and stabilization
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 73. With respect to incident command, priorities, and stabilization, the candidate shall do the following:
    (1) Explain the incident command structure and responsibilities.
    (2) Explain the role of the motor sports responder in the safe operation of any motor sports event.
    (3) Explain safe response to an incident, including the following:
    (A) Evaluate the scene for fire and medical issues.
    (B) Survey of spectator areas for injuries.
    (C) Cleanup of debris.
    (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-73; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3403)

    655 IAC 1-2.1-74 Placement of emergency apparatus; personnel safety
    Authority: IC 22-14-2-7
    Affected: IC 22-14-2-7

    Sec. 74. The candidate shall explain the safe placement of emergency apparatus in a variety of scenarios and necessary safety precautions applicable to working personnel, participants, and spectators. (Board of Firefighting Personnel Standards and Education; 655 IAC 1-2.1-74; filed Jul 18, 1996, 3:00 p.m.: 19 IR 3403)

    I forgot to give the address of the Public Safety Training Institute, it is: http://www.state.in.us/sema/psti.html


    [This message has been edited by DD (edited March 18, 2000).]

  10. #30
    Sfrsc4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Thank you DD. That sure is helpful. It doesn't look like I was too far off the mark trying to remember this on my own.

    ------------------
    Roger Ellis, Capt. Speedway Fire/Rescue
    http://speedwayfire.8m.com
    ICQ#: 61722026

  11. #31
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    I'm asking...Please submit a list of topics that should be included in a motorsports safety/ff/rescue training program.

    Try to be generally specific and include any references you can.

    Later some proposals can be developed for a minimal standard.

  12. #32
    AZEMT
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    I know that in the Phoenix area tracks (Firebird and PIR) the Safety Safaris are from Rural/Metro. I race a 310+mph jet dragster around the country for a living and have met alot of safety crews in the process. Although weve never needed the assistance its nice to know their available if we need it. You can check out our page at WWW.INVADERJET.COM

  13. #33
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question

    Who can provide some contact info. for the Safety Safari folks?

  14. #34
    DD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I think that Al's Emergency 1 is a rapid response vehicle with a warp drive. The jet is for the areas with slower, congested traffic. Look at his invader jet site.

  15. #35
    SCCARESCUE
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Hi everyone! Sorry I have not checked this in a while. Here are some thoughts:

    The committee looking into the need for a standard for motorsport facilities has been busy. The committee is a virtual "who's who" of veteran race track responders and managers. Interests of both sides of the issue - fire and motorsports - are well represented by respected people. However, as with any standard, it will take time to develop and even longer to implement. Rest assured that everyone will have a chance to respond to any proposals they may develop.

    Training is an issue we use at my track. we host a 2 day seminar on safety. In addition, my fire crews have 5 days of live fire/live rescue training BEFORE we hit the track each season. All attend - even the veterans. We use real cars and real fuels and real agents to solve the various problems. Last year we used over 1000 lbs of Purple K in training alone. If you use the agents in training, and train well, with good scenarios, you will use far less agent during the season - as your people will know how to use it, when to use it and how much to use. We use Sodium Bicarb, Purple K, and Cold fire as our main agents. Portland cement is used for metallic fires.

    Rescue equipment for a race track is the same stuff for the street, with a few exceptions: On the track we must deal with new alloys and welding materials, Carbon Fiber, Lexan windshields. There are few "specialized" tools - just stuff you find every day. Dewalt 18v cordless stuff - drills, circ saw and reciprocating saws are very useful. Coarse tooth, short saws are great for fiberglass and carbon fiber. Face masks are needed for carbon fiber cutting.

    enough for now!! I am off to the races in Charlotte - lets get some other guys in here!!

    Dan Martelle

    ------------------
    Dan Martelle

  16. #36
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Thanks Dan for your reply. Who is serving on the committee, and how should they be contacted?

  17. #37
    Ladder Man
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Any new developments guys and gals? It has been a few months since anyone has posted anything here.

  18. #38
    Sfrsc4
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Wink

    Sorry, I haven't posted anything in a while either. It has been a busy season, as usuall. We havn't had too many big incidents to critique, nor any new tactics or procedures to try. I am sure that after the season winds down in the next month or two, more will be posted here, and elsewhere.

    ------------------
    Roger Ellis, Capt. Speedway Fire/Rescue
    http://speedwayfire.8m.com
    ICQ#: 61722026

  19. #39
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Plymouth, WI
    Posts
    1

    Default Nfpa 610

    I do not know if anyone is watching this thread. NFPA 610 a guidline has been out for a couple years and is in the process of bei8ng revised. Chief Jones is no longer chairing the committee but remains on it and very active. The new chair is a firfighter, race car driver and also on a motorsports safety team. We would love to have input from all for improvements. Our biggest dissapointment has been lack of interest since it was published. Presently I serve as secretary of the committee.

  20. #40
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Virginia Department of Fire Programs offers a program called Motorsports Emergency Response Training (NFPA 610). There are a number of Busch and Nextel tracks in Virginia, and I understand the training is pretty good.

    You can contact the VDFP at www.vafire.com or (804) 371-0220 and see if they can give you some curriculum information, or even schedule taking the class from them. Those people in states nearby very well may be able to travel to take the course.

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