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Thread: Stokes Baskets

  1. #1
    Flochief
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Stokes Baskets

    What Stokes Baskets are the best? Also Are there any way to test baskets That are exposed to extreme conditions. This includes stored on top of Trucks in inclement weather , sunlight etc.


  2. #2
    Litch
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation

    Any plastic basket style stretcher should be stored out of direct sunlight, as UV rays will break down the plastic over time. If your basket has obviously faded areas you should check it over closely, looking for cracking of the plastic, especially at rivets and where the plastic bends over the rails. Metal baskets should be inspected at the welds for cracking and rough spots that could snag or cut rigging materials. The wire mesh should also be checked for broken areas, as should any slats that are present.
    Plastic vs wire mesh basket styles depends on what your local needs are. If you are in snow country, plastic may be better in terms of insulating the patient and moving over snow.

  3. #3
    ADSN/WFLD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Stay away from the Orange Plastic Stokes from FERNO, it isn't rated for the high angle environment.

    If you want plastic I would only recommend the yellow one from JUNKIN.

    The strongest is the Mil spec wire basket litter. (without the leg divider, it just gets in the way)

    The Ferno's strength is from the plastic itself. An old UV damaged strecher could separate from the top bar. Also in extreme cold the FERNO could crack.

    The JUNKIN has a metal frame supporting the pt's weight. If the plastic cracked the frame would hold the pt.

  4. #4
    Techresq
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    One of the stretcher you should check-out is called Traverse. It's a metal stretcher with a mesh liner instead of wire. It also has a plastic back board that the trunk of the body lies on and give some support. With the plastic section you don't lay on the frame work of the stretcher. This will help from having to put a back-board in. You can get ahold of Lance Piatt at Rescue Response Gear for more information. His web-site address is www.Rescueresponse.com
    David Gerrer
    Technical Training Solutions,LLC www.TechTrngSols.com

  5. #5
    rsqswmr
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Smile

    I am new to posting but here is the information I have. In the Navy we use a litter called the Medivac litter. It is a collabsible litter that folds in half. It comes in a carrying case with straps for carrying on the back. We use the litter for water rescue, patient pick up, and high angle/hoist evolutions. It is small enough to be stored on a boat or in the compartment of an engine. I have used both the basket type and the medivac type in my carreer and I perfer the medivac. That is my opinion though. Good luck in you shopping.

    ------------------
    So others may live.

  6. #6
    RESQ4BEN
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I will have of agree with some of the other messages to store plastic litters out of the sunlight on your truck. However, I do like the plastic Ferno 71 for the high-angle work. It is very versatile, easy to work with, and strong enough. You can also go with the wire mesh baskets wihtout the leg divider and have a real good basket. Good luck.

  7. #7
    ADSN/WFLD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs down

    Ben, If your department is using the Ferno Model 71 for high angle work, then you need to give them this information.

    The Orange Ferno Model 71 (http://emergency.ferno.com/Stretchers/m71.htm) is only rated for a max load of 600lbs. even though they state that the stretcher is UV protected, we have all seen 71's that are faded. The sun, and weather in general, will weaken the stretcher over time.

    You can't place a human life 100 ft up in a basket that the strength is an unknown. Also even new, the 600lb load limit only gives you a 2.4:1 safety margin. (250lb load) No other piece of our equipment, in a high angle environment, has a safety margin that low.

    Just look at a basic lowering system with an attendant. (500 lbs)
    .5 static line 18:1
    Anchor strap 16:1
    anchor plate 17.8:1
    carabiners 32:1
    NFPA Rack 12:1
    bridle 10:1
    prusik cords 5.75:1
    ...
    as you can see the ferno stretcher is rated far under your average rescue equipment.

    I'd push hard for the Junking @ 1,200 lbs or the standard mil spec litter @ 2,500 lbs.

    Stay Safe

  8. #8
    wofd1
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    WE REPLACED OUR ORANGE STOKES 3 YEARS AGO AFTER IT CRACKED, 2 ND ONE TO DO THAT FOR US. WE CURRENTLY ARE USING THE JUNKIN YELLOW WITH STEEL FRAME, I THINK ITS MODEL# IS SAF-200 I THINK. ITS HELD UP GOOD FOR US SO FAR IN DRILLS AND ACTUAL INCIDENTS. THE BOTTOM IS SUPPORTED BY THE STEEL FRAME WORK AS WELL AS THE TOP PORTION. STAY SAFE

  9. #9
    JStrickTRT1
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    I agree with most of the above stated replies. We prefer the CMC stainless stokes basket in the rectangular configuration for rope work. I am unsure of the reason why baskets are still manufactured with leg dividers. The majority of the time if a patient is in a basket they should be spinally immobilized or on a device to ease their exit from the basket when they get to the ED. Unless you can insure that you will never have a patient on a backboard that is not tapered at the feet you should have a rectangular basket. The 2500 lb rating is also a nice option. Although, don't throw away your plastic ferno basket if it is in good shape. We use this extensively in our trench operations. If is much more comfortable for the patient because it limits the mud and water they are exposed to. It also slides and floats better in the goo. Our primary means of patient evacuation in a trench is a ground ladder slide. The plastic basket also works better than the wire type for this. We keep two ferno baskets in our collapse unit, and two wire baskets in our Heavy Rescue.

    Capt. J. Strickland
    Miami-Dade Fire Rescue
    Special Operations Division

  10. #10
    Litch
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I had the opportunity to examine one of Traverse Rescue's new wire basket stretcher with the mesh patient insert at a trade show last spring. I was quite impressed with it at the time, though I have not had the opportunity to use one in the real world. I have used the Junkin yellow plastic basket a number of times and have, overall, been happy. We use the newer FW plastic basket for ladder slides up/ down embankments.

  11. #11
    Lt Tim
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    If you have the space and the need , carry both. I use the wire stokes for anytime you have to attach a rope and haul. I'll only use the plastic one for hand hauling situations because of it's lighter wieght. They also work great for use in snow where you need to slide your pt. A must with metal stokes is to assure that all your backboards will fit inside them.

    ------------------

  12. #12
    fyrfitr42
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Hello,

    Yes, I agree with retiring the ferno from rope work. Like some others said-----"DON'T THROW IT AWAY!!!!!!"-----. We use our old one as a sled behind our personal water craft. It works great!!! The wood rails underneath and the foam pad inside it provides just the perfect amount of floatation for this application.

    Surf's Up!!

    ------------------
    ~~John Troyer~~
    -Sedgwick County Fire Dept
    Tech. Rescue Station #37
    Wichita, KS
    -Hutchinson Comm. College
    Tech Rescue Instructor
    fyrfitr42@firehousemail.com

    [This message has been edited by fyrfitr42 (edited 01-01-2001).]

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