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  1. #1
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question How many rescue "specialties" are there

    How many rescue "specialties" can you name?


  2. #2
    NCRSQ751
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Compiling a list or testing us? ;-)
    I'm sure I'll miss some, but here goes:

    Trench
    Confined Space
    High/Low Angle Rope
    Tower
    Swiftwater
    Dive
    Collapse
    Auto Ex
    Farm Extrication
    Land Search
    Large Animal
    Elevator

    Some share elements (i.e. rope and tower) but the way I see it, some situations require training over and above the 'usual' and should be their own entity to do them 'right'.

    That's all I can come up with at the moment. Anyone else?

    ------------------
    Susan Bednar
    Captain - Forsyth Rescue Squad
    North Carolina Task Force 1

  3. #3
    Litch
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I would add cave rescue to Captain Bednar's list.

  4. #4
    RSQLT43
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Ice rescue

    Surf rescue

    large commercial vehicles-- buses, subways, airliners

    R.I.T., I consider this a rescue specialty.

  5. #5
    RWK
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Several addt'l that are specialties/sub-specialties in their own right:

    Mine rescue
    Wilderness (could include sub-spec. like High Altitude, Crevasse, Alpine)
    Avalanche

    Like NCRSQ751 said - some (most?) overlap and may create their own specialties in their own right - rescue in a flooded mine/cave w/vertical access = dive/cave-mine/high-angle rescue.

  6. #6
    dtj
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    port-o-potty extrication

  7. #7
    DuMoYea FF
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Lets not forget:

    Probie rescue
    Batt. Chief rescue

  8. #8
    ADSN/WFLD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    NFPA 1670 list 7 general categories:

    Collapse
    Trench
    Confined Space
    Vertical/Rope
    Roadway/Machine
    Wilderness
    Dive/Water

    If your developing a training program I'd ref. the NFPA standard to better define the awareness, operations, and technician levels. It will probably help add credibility to your program.

  9. #9
    apatrol
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Farm Extrication? being a city boy i have no idea what that means... Getting hands and feet out of tillers and stuff I guess!!! Someone give me a clue!

  10. #10
    fireman_387
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Apatrol,
    Farm rescue is a varied field from getting someone caught in a piece of machinery like a combine (large machine that harvests stuff like wheat and corn) to getting somone from a confined space such as a upright silo and anything between.

  11. #11
    NCRSQ751
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    The reason I separate farm extrication is because when we hear 'extrication' we all like to cut. In Farm Ex that's usually not the case. In most cases it's easier and faster to disassemble which requires some knowledge of the machinery and what tools are needed.

    There is also a significant element of Haz Mat involved on farms due to the large amount of chemicals used and (improperly)stored on most farms. The silos are confined space incidents waiting to happen.

    Farms are basically a big accident waiting to happen in many cases because of the large amount of non-compliance with safety issues. Safety guards are regularly removed from machinery, young children are regularly employed running machinery or working in silos, and like I said, storage methods for chemicals are scary at best.

    The FARMEDIC course out of Alfred University is a good one to start with. I found it to be an eye opener and actually a lot of fun.

    ------------------
    Susan Bednar
    Captain - Forsyth Rescue Squad
    North Carolina Task Force 1

  12. #12
    M G
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Farm/Agricultural rescue is the country equivalent of industrial machinery rescue in the city


    ------------------
    The information presented herin is simply my opinion and does not represent the opinion or view of my employer(s) or any department/agency to which I belong.

  13. #13
    billy
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    All the info. sounds good.

    Consider "farm" eqt. ext. in the city as well. Possibly construction eqt. overturning, golf courese use tractors, etc.

  14. #14
    Lt Tim
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Billy, you've opened a can of worms here. I agree that maybe we should stick with what 1670 has. Otherwise the list could go on. How about Medic Rescue or Engine Co. Rescue.
    With 1670 we have a standard already in place. Let's not reinvent that wheel.

    ------------------

  15. #15
    NCRSQ751
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Lt. Tim,
    I think we would all agree that the 'standard' should be 1670/1006, but just like anything else - do we want to stop at the standard?

    Many departments have other responsibilities, i.e. fire suppression and do not have the manpower, equipment or budget to go above and beyond that. In some cases, especially in NC where a majority of the specialized rescue is done by Rescue Squads with no other responsibilities (or maybe just EMS first responder) we do have the ability to go beyond the standard.

    In my department we require the 'standard' of the day as a minimum requirement for all members. We then ask people to find one or two areas they want to specialize in, go get training and bring it back to the team. That way we can be continuously learning new things as well as keeping with the current standard.

    So while these specialties may be overkill to some departments - those of us who that's all we do - find them necessary - and it enables us to help the others when they need it!


    ------------------
    Susan Bednar
    Captain - Forsyth Rescue Squad
    North Carolina Task Force 1

  16. #16
    jemar
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question

    QUESTION:

    What specialities would YOU enclude in technical resque?

  17. #17
    fyrfitr42
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Hello,
    A lot of speciality rescue is derived from other rescue "basics". Just sticking with the basics, while giving you a good base to work from, doesn't prepare you for the special hazards associated with all of these types of rescue presented here.

    Oh, don't forget well rescue.

    ------------------
    ~~John Troyer~~
    -Sedgwick County Fire Dept
    Tech. Rescue Station #37
    Wichita, KS
    -Hutchinson Comm. College
    Tech Rescue Instructor
    fyrfitr42@firehousemail.com

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