1. #1
    FFRAGS
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default LADDER TRUCK TYPES

    OUR DEPARTMENT IS LOOKING TO REPLACE OUR LADDER TRUCK AND I AM LOOKING FOR IDEAS & SUGGESTIONS. I WOULD LIKE YOUR THOUGHTS AND IDEAS ON THE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTGES OF A STRAIGHT STICK COMPARED TO A TOWER OR BUCKET. ALSO YOUR THOUGHTS ON REARMOUNT AND MIDMOUNT. THANKS, AND LETS TRY AND KEEP YOUR THOUGHTS AND IDEAS TO THIS SUBJECT. THANKS, AND REMEMBER, TURN THOSE PASS DEVICES ON!

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  2. #2
    IRISH95
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    My dept has a 1994 E-One 95' tower/ladder. The opinions in the dept. are mixed. Many want a stick, and many want the bucket.
    Pros for a bucket: Personnel can get up to where they need to get to, faster and safer. Buckets can be used safer in conducting rescues from heights greater than your highest ground ladder. Safer for personnel during elevated master stream operations. Personnel can look down on the area of involvement, direct the stream and see its effects.

    Cons for a bucket: Adds to the size of the truck. Increases the purchase price considerably. Drivers now have to contend with an overhanging obstacle. Sticks are able to get into places that a bucket can't.

    As for the arguement over midship or rear mount, I can't say, since I've been in the dept we have had rear mounts. Check out the E-Ones. They have different sizes and chassis available. Their best feature is the under slung scissors jacks. By far the quickest set up time and no having to pin the jacks. From the time of arrival to the time our bucket is up out of the bed is about 45 seconds if the driver is good. A so-so driver about a minute.

  3. #3
    LadderCo13
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    If you only have 1 truck you should go with a tower. You can do more things with a tower than you can with a stick. The downside is there are a few places you can't put a tower that you can a stick.

  4. #4
    firebeacon
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    Since you already have a ladder truck, you can carry over any design features that are currently working onto the new rig. You have to take into consideration the many different requirements of a ladder such as rescue with the ladder, water tower operations, use of the ladders and equipment it will carry, fire scene support, and overhaul & salvage operations. Remember that the addition of a pump will not only increase the cost but will reduce the amount of usuable space. The addition of any handlines will have a bearing on the placement at a fire scene and could minimize the effective use of the aerial

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  5. #5
    firebeacon
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    Since you already have a ladder truck, you can carry over any design features that are currently working onto the new rig. You have to take into consideration the many different requirements of a ladder such as rescue with the ladder, water tower operations, use of the ladders and equipment it will carry, fire scene support, and overhaul & salvage operations. Remember that the addition of a pump will not only increase the cost but will reduce the amount of usuable space. The addition of any handlines will have a bearing on the placement at a fire scene and could minimize the effective use of the aerial

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  6. #6
    firebeacon
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    Since you already have a ladder truck, you can carry over any design features that are currently working onto the new rig. You have to take into consideration the many different requirements of a ladder such as rescue with the ladder, water tower operations, use of the ladders and equipment it will carry, fire scene support, and overhaul & salvage operations. Remember that the addition of a pump will not only increase the cost but will reduce the amount of usuable space. The addition of any handlines will have a bearing on the placement at a fire scene and could minimize the effective use of the aerial

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  7. #7
    JohnM
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    We have a tiller and a platform. If we only could have one type, I would have a platform.It is able to do a lot of things, is stable and is superior if you must rescue somebody.It is nice to work off on cheap truss roofs, and makes overhaul and window venting easy. One thing I would not do again is put a pump on it.Loss of compartmet space, extra weight, cost more, and we have enough engines to pump to it. The overhang in the front was strange at first, but fine once you get used to it. I like the bucket in the front where I can see it, rather than the rear where it can swing out during a sharp turn, and smack something. We can get 1500 gpm out of ours with a straight tip, but I guess water flow would be similar with either type.We put a cascade system on ours, but I don't know if you would want that for your operation. Works fine for us. We did spec aluminum diamond plate on the platform front and sides to prevent paint damage due to low trees while the rig is driving.Tillers are fine trucks but it takes a bunch of drivers training to get everybody up to speed and keep everybody current. We have hit alot of cars with our tiller also. No accidents with the platform since new in 1993. Best of luck with your ladder hunt!

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