1. #1
    Pat222
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post New engine ideas.

    I hope to get as many replies to this as I expect this subject to bring. My engine company is about to embark on the adventure (or nightmare) of designing a new piece of apparatus and I was lucky enough to have been placed on the truck committee. I am already hearing how "We should get the same engine we have just in a newer body." and "It's worked for 20 years, why change it?" I on the other hand want to be progressive and spec. out an engine with the latest and greatest technologies. This engine is going to be with us for 20 years. Why start out 5 years behind the times. A little background on my company: we respond on approx. 700 calls a year (busiest in town), our district is comprised of a mix of single family residential and commercial bldgs., 2 major highways, 1 mall (largest in state), 1 hospital and approx. 8 schools, we usually have a min. of 6 guys on the engine and we are volunteer. The committee hasn't started meeting yet, but in 3 weeks we will be attending a convention and will be looking over apparatus while there. I have looked through the forum and have seen good ideas (CAFS, headsets, etc.) and already have a few of my own. I want to do this thing right, so what I am asking is for all you guys to help out. Send me all your ideas, thoughts and experiences with manufacturers, equipment, new technologies, "custom designs" and anything else you can think of. The more heads the better. Maybe this will help out other committees as well that are about to start this adventure. Thanks and I am sure I will talk to you guys more about this subject in the coming months.

    [This message has been edited by Pat222 (edited August 25, 1999).]

  2. #2
    resqb
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    A few questions first. Are you going to just be running just as an engine (Went to city of Paramus web site found there's a rescue squad, but nothing about specific equipment)? Do you need to draft often? Do you find the current piece lacking (hose lays, Ease of use, generator, engine/trans/rear axle combo)? Also do you run any EMS? Asking for help is going to give you many of the pros and cons you want but I'm really curious of what your company (or you Pat) wants to do with this new piece. With your town's median income of $50000 I'm sure you'll stay away from the cookie cutter trucks which my dept just bought. These just weren't made for my area (you know the ones, $140,000 for a "custom" class a pumper).
    Now here's my two cents on what I think a good piece needs.
    1. A reputable manufacturer with good dealer support(need the work done on the rig after delivery) read thru the forums you'll get the idea of the top 4 or 5
    2. Minimum speed of 30 mph up your steepest hill. Top speed of 65 for your highway reponses. And can get out of its own way from a stop.
    3. A pumping capacity for your area (anybody can throw out a number but only you and ISO know what the town needs)
    4. Good lighting to turn night into day.
    5. Air conditioning (after 10 hours of a 14 hour night shift in a reserve piece w/o A/C in 80 degree temps I now consider this a necessity).
    6. Minimum 500 water. As the commercials say, anything less is just uncivilized
    7. Warning devices. Federal Q2B is a must! A reserve air tank for air horns in city traffic is also a good idea. Spend the money for proper emerg. lighting.
    As for hose compartment and ladders and body configuration I think some of the questions at the top of this post need to be answered...resqb

    [This message has been edited by resqb (edited September 02, 1999).]

  3. #3
    JohnM
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Your district is similar to ours. I realize however that you guys have your own operation and likes and dislikes. We got a new Pierce about 2 years ago and have had very good luck with it. I like to keep an engine design fairly simple and easy to use. Less stuff to break, the more time it is in your station wating to go on a call.Our rig has these things which worked ok for us. No generator, we use nightfighter sealed beam lights for spot/flood and a gas PPV. No generator pto, no fuel to mess with, no maintenance except to possibly change a bulb every few years. No relief valve to stick or malfunction. Got a pressure governor which works like a dream and can be taught to a new driver in about 3 minutes. No moving parts, uses the existing electronic engine controls. I like a 750 gal tank, a little more breathing room when dealing with car fires and any delays getting hydrant water started. A poly tank is wonderful also, no tank anodes to change and a life time guarantee. I don't like CAFS(here come the nastygrams!), expensive, many more mechanical components, and I don't think it is really that much better than water. Crew head sets get caught up in SCBAs and the guys in the back, just put a speaker pointing backwards so they can hear the radio.If you get a quality rig, it won't be too loud with the warning equipment operating. The TFT gun is great also, 1250 gpm on the truck or ground. Easy to use and set up. The 5" inlet is the way to go in my opinion, if you have LDH.If not, this would be the time to start your LDH experience.Best of luck!

  4. #4
    e33
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation

    Wow, thats an interesting reply...pass up all the things that make life safer and easier beacuse of the possibility it will break. Humph. I find that very intriguing. Skimp on lighting, don't protect guys hearing and make communications easier, dont get foam...WOW. I guess we are all entitled to our own opinions, but y dont you just tell this poor progressive soul that he should buy a used fire pumper from the early 70's...thats what you are saying in a nutshell, isnt it?? I don't mean to be harsh, but i know what the gentleman who started the post wants..( i think) and it is a new and progressive styled engine which can accomplish a variety of tasks. Go for the generator, get lots of lighting..even a light tower, get foam...class a and b for that matter. Get headsets, get lots of intakes and discharges. Get long lengths of suction hose..if the need is there. Get big compartments and design them around what you want to carry now and possibly in the future. Put crosslay beds low enough to reach, dont make the back hosebed too high,...etc. Decide what you want, sit down and lay it out then go scout out the users of similar units. Take a year or 2 and do a good job investigating.

  5. #5
    captlen
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I have been involved with buying two pieces of apparatus, one engine, one truck< I would agree with alot of the things already said. Gen, ac, lights, cross lays etc. I think are a must. Dealer support is a big must for me, If and when it breaks it needs to be fixed. If it must go back to the factory everytime the down time will kill you. You and your comm. must decide what this engine is going to do now and for the next twenty years. Look at your town is change coming? Any new buildings coming that will presnet new problems for your dept. Going to the shows are a big help. See what's out thier. Also look at what other departments are doing, maybe their ideas and solutions will help you. Just take your time. If you have questions about pumps call the pump manufactures direct they love to talk with you. They will tell you things sometimes the dealers don't know. That goes for everything else. Well good luck and just remember that you can have anything you want you just have to payed for it, and then is it really worth it, or could the money be spent better on other things, only you can decide. You know your town the best.

  6. #6
    JohnM
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    To e33,
    Take it easy dude! You sound like a you had a bad day. I did not say not to get items that promote safety and ease of operation. I only included some of my opinions. No we do not have a rig w/CAFS. We do have headsets and you better have plenty of spares on hand for all the broken cords and headsets. There is nothing easier than turning around and saying to Joe in the back that we are going to catch the next plug! Have you ever fixed a fire truck, and I mean more than change a light bulb? I have for about 15 years in addition to suppression. Did you guys have electronic pressure governors 20 years ago? I like them, but it would be news to me that somebody used them 20 years back. Got news for you about noise. If you can carry on a normal conversation without raising your voice, it is not a hazardous noise area. And that is the case in our newer trucks.I get my hearing checked every year, and no loss in over 20 years. And yes we have a 6kw light tower on the rescue, we let the rescue do its thing. If you want one on an engine fine! Do you have nightfighter lights? Don't knock em till you have tried them. Seems to me FDNY has them on all their engines, would they be there if they didn't work? I thought a brother wanted a little advise about a new engine, not "my engine is better than yours" sort of stuff.

  7. #7
    e33
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    Sorry if my point came across harsh...but thats the way i was interpreting it. As far as the nightfighters go..more 12v crap to suck the voltage down, and have you ever seen an FDNY scene that is lit very well..I havent! One hell of a fire dept, but they love to work in the dark. Sorry if i offended anyone.

  8. #8
    Ray R
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We purchased a Pierce\Freightliner in 1996. It does not have a generator but does have the nightfighter lights. If you go this route make sure that the manufacturer certifies that the electrical system will carry the total load of warning lights and auxillary lights. We found that approximately 30 minutes of operation would pull the batteries down to to the point of making everything electrical malfunction. We solved it by adding an additional battery and managing the electrical load.

    Some things that have worked well for us are;
    1. Top mount pump panel. Your operator has better visibility of the scene and is not as subject to being struck by vehicles on the highway.
    2. 4" or larger rear intake controlled from the pump panel. This keeps your LDH away from the sides of the truck and makes compartment access easier in addition to not requiring as much space on the street to make the connection. If you do water shuttles, it allows you to place the portable tank at the rear of the truck in those situations where there is not room for placement at the side of the truck.
    3. Extended front bumper with a hose tray and discharge for 100 to 150 ft. of 1 3/4" line and nozzle. Works great for vehicle fires, trash lines etc.


  9. #9
    Pat222
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    First, I just want to thank you for all your replies so far on this subject. There a couple of good ideas in them. Let me answer a few questions I read.

    resqb:
    - We have 4 engines, 2 towers, 2 heavy rescues, haz-mat, foam pumper, 1 mini-pumper and a LDH engine.
    - No drafting will be needed since we have no lakes or rivers.
    - Our current piece is sufficient for now. Would like for more storage.
    - We have a separate EMS organization so we do not respond on EMS calls.
    - I never thought of the ISO pump capacity. Will look into that.

    My ideas for my comm. match most of everbodys. E33 and Ray R. have a lot of the same ideas that I have in my head. I appreciate the info. Keep them coming and I will respond a little quicker.

  10. #10
    Dalmation90
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Random thoughts on Engines...

    Big tanks are good. Of course, I come from an area where hydrants are still a thing we drive by and can't believe we now have And my own "comfort zone" is having 1200-1500 gallons on the first due engine.

    A little EMS equipment is good. Even if you don't run EMS calls, you can use it for yourselves. All our apparatus carry at least a basic trauma/O2 kit, a couple backboards (also used whenever you need a hunk of plywood for whatever), and a set of collars and straps. One day, I reckon you'll see AEDs on them too...now there just on our "rescue" vehicles. Remember #1 killer of firefighters...heart attack. Oughta have the first aid equipment handy.

    We don't use ladders off our engines too often, so there up high (basically above the hosebed)...somehow andrenaline seems to make them a lot closer to the ground. But it's important to have basic truck tools for when the ladder's aren't there "on-the-quick." So in addition to the ground ladders, a power saw (gas or electric), a smoke ejector, and a PPV fan are all good.

    Hose, hose, hose...it's an engine after all. A "bomb line" of 3" or so preconnected to a master stream makes a quick hard hitting attack. Have a variety of preconnects and hose bed storage. We use "hi-rise" packs mainly as a convience to add length to our preconnects. We have an unusual setup of having 1.5" and 1.75" hose kept pressurized on reels like boosters. If that's too exotic, our "service" truck (Forestry/Initial Attack/EMS) has a lightweight hard-walled 1.5" hose used for CAFS work. It would make a neat booster reel on a CAFS pumper...and give 1.5" flows in the 125gpm range when needed.

    Speaking about CAFS, go for it. The weight (or lack of it) and effectiveness of the lines is incredible. I can very easily work a 100' 1.5" CAFS line alone, moving it around a scene for wet down or what ever. A recent fire I missed but saw our video was neat. Our ladder pipe was flowing about 500gpm knocking down the fire...which kept popping back up as soon as the stream moved to another area. Supply was by tankers, and we already had other handlines and master streams in ops, so we couldn't boost the flow on the ladder pipe. But we ran a 2.5" halfway up the ladder, running CAFS from another department's CAFS pumper. Fire in the area went out. The 500gpm ladder pipe knocked down the visible fire, the 2.5" CAFS line followed and stopped it from reigniting. On fires like out-buildings where experience says we usually used 2-3 tank loads of water (about 2500-3000gallons), we've been knocking down the fire, mopping up, and going home without emptying our 1200 gallon tank when used with Class A foam. (For those of you wondering, the ladder wasn't extended, so we could safely have have two hoses going up it without overloading it.)

    Big bright lights. Gotta see what you're doing. Our ET190 (main Attack engine), Engine190 (hose tender), and Ladder 190 all have 5kw-7.5kw remote start generators with key quartz lights left in the "on" position, and pointing slightly down towards the ground. As the driver pulls up to the driveway (we usually pull into the driveway to fight fire...unusual to stay on the road)he flips a switch, and he has 3000watts or more of lighting to see where he's positioning the rig. And crews on scene immediately can see where they're walking.

    Plumb, Plumb, Plumb. You should be able to get 750gpm MINIMUM from the tank...I'd spec at least 1000gpm flows...dual 3" or single 4" tank-to-pump pipes. Designate where you want full flow discharges. As long as you're getting a standard pumper, you might as well get at least a 1500gpm. Don't skimp on piping anywhere.

    Well, I've rambled enough...
    Matt

  11. #11
    K A
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    ==Did you guys have electronic pressure governors 20 years ago? I like them, but it would be news to me that somebody used them 20 years back. =

    Of course we did, as far back as 1973. What is the point????

    --Do you have nightfighter lights? Don't knock em till you have tried them. Seems to me FDNY has them on all their engines, would they be there if they didn't work? ..

    The light foot print for the money expended is a joke compared to a real floodlight. Even NFPA doesn't allow a 12 volt nightfighter to replace the compliment of floodlights.

    --- I never thought of the ISO pump capacity. --

    the maximum ISO requirement for pump capacity is 3500 gpm, almost everyone exceeds that.


  12. #12
    FyredUp
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Just a few thoughts.

    1) Water tank of at least 1000 gallons, more if non-hydranted areas. Its nice to have that water to make ahit while supply is being set-up.

    2) Class A foam. I know KA will disagree with me on this....but I am not sold on using CAFs inside on fire attack. A friend of mine is a career firefighter in a city that bought CAFs units and they have quit using CAFs and now only use the class A foam for attack. They were unhappy with the lack of heat reduction with the CAFs.

    3) Hose bed capacity. Make sure the beds, preconnect and main supply bed carry what you need and want, not what the manufacturer normally builds. Perhaps you need a 400foot preconect, or 2000 feet of 5 inch, the bed should be built to hold them then.

    4) Compartment space. Figure out exactly what you are going to carry and build bigger than that to allow for future needs.

    5) Air conditioning. This is no longer a nice option, it is a necessity. Take careof your people.

    6) Generator. Get one you can start from inside the cab. We have AMPS generators, they work great.

    7) Preconnected reels for tools and electricity. Speed is the key here.

    8) Access to ladders and suction hose. Either thru the tank type of arrangement or overhead hydraulic ladder racks. This keeps them out of the way but easily accessible.

    Just a few ideas for you. I just got back from Kansas City and the apparatus at the Chief's show was unbelievable. Think outside of the box when you locate preconnects and reels and compartments. The times they are a changin'.

    Good luck.

  13. #13
    Mike C
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    2) Class A foam. I know KA will disagree with me on this....but I am not sold on using CAFs inside on fire attack. A friend of mine is a career firefighter in a city that bought CAFs units and they have quit using CAFs and now only use the class A foam for attack. They were unhappy with the lack of heat reduction with the CAFs.


    Another big city with 40 CAF engines simply opens the nozzle a few seconds after knock down and walks in just fine..but they only protect 2 million people.

    Suppose it is a training issue. I'd never by a Grunman tower ladder because DC didn't put the outriggers down and it fell over, I'd never buy an E0NE beacuse the 40 rigs they sold to Houston have ground ladders mounted 8 feet off the ground and do not have a lift to help getting them off and you cannot get inside of the compartments wet on the officer side of the rig and the two times I tried opening a door latch it was broken, I'd never use a circular saw because Phoenix cut a tolulene tank with theirs and it killed a fire fighter, I'd never use a Snorkle cause Memphis used one and hit a guys head against a power line, I'd never use a MSA because firefighters Pittsburg ran out of air with theirs, I'd never use Passport accountability system because Seattle lost a bunch of guys at a fire using it, I'd never use 1 4/4" hose because FDNY used it and klilled three guys, I'd never own a PASS device because most firefighters who've died don't turn them on, I'd never hire a women firefighter because one fell off a tailboard and died, I'd never use ICS or accountability because one day ago an organization using it forgot a firefighter and came back to find he\im dead, I'd never run brush calls because three guys in one county died at two events stepping on a live wire, I'd never use a Scott because three guys died in FDNY wearing one, I'd never use, I'd never take car of my fire trucks and always let dateline NBC in my department because you get all new trucks and imagers, I'd never use, I'd never use, because so and so did something stupid, isn't trained, or doesn't have a clue.

    I'd rather have a real reason why.

    Fires go out, heat drops 500% faster than with water or Class A foam according to ISFSI, you less water, have an easier line to pull, acording to boston accomplish what a line flowing twice the water accomplishes, you clean up with a broom that is a good reason for CAFS.


  14. #14
    Ray R
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Read the current issue of Fire Chief Magazine. They have an excellent article on tests done in Germany using Class A foam. It appears to be the best documated test conducted to date and offers excellent comparisons of foam vs water.

  15. #15
    FyredUp
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Mike do you feel better now?

    What I meant and I guess for YOU I should have spelled out more clearly was: Class A foam....yes put it on the engine, use it for fire attack. It works great. I am not convinced that CAFs is the answer for interior fire attack. In case you don't realize there is class A foam without CAFs. I never said he shouldn't buy CAFs, I never attacked anyone elses opinion, I just expressed mine. I realize trying to explain only gives you another chance to go off on another insane tantrum about who knows what.

    If you go back to the top of this Topic the originator of it asked for ideas from everyone, not just you. Take a valium, relax and just try to chill out.

  16. #16
    FyredUp
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Mike do you feel better now?

    What I meant and I guess for YOU I should have spelled out more clearly was: Class A foam....yes put it on the engine, use it for fire attack. It works great. I am not convinced that CAFs is the answer for interior fire attack. In case you don't realize there is class A foam without CAFs. I never said he shouldn't buy CAFs, I never attacked anyone elses opinion, I just expressed mine. I realize trying to explain only gives you another chance to go off on another insane tantrum about who knows what.

    If you go back to the top of this Topic the originator of it asked for ideas from everyone, not just you. Take a valium, relax and just try to chill out.

  17. #17
    Phred
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question

    Matt or FyredUp;

    Question: With a normal CAFS installation, do you have the option of using full CAFS -OR- just a water + Class A solution without the air? I thought that CAFS allowed the operator to change the amount of air flow to adjust the consistency of the resulting foam. If you can dial the air down to zero, that should solve the problem of wanting a high water flow for high heat absorbtion situations. If no, how hard would it be to modify the system to allow for no air input?

  18. #18
    TRUCK 110
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    My only things that I would say is Few..When speccing Hosebeds, spec your Hosebeds for the Future. Now what does he mean..??

    Your crosslays should be specced for the Largest hose you use for attack with the Hand Forces. I just came off an Engine Committee, and I specced each crosslay for 300' of 2.5" Hose in 50' Lengths. We do not use such a Beast, but the Day of the cramped Crosslay has been rectified by this Foresight. The crosslay also has a 2.5" Chixson Valve too.

    Now my Dept uses 1.75, 2, and 2.5 as Handlines in these Crosslays, but as we all know, today you could be Captain, tommorrow Firefighter, and Captain X this year wants this lay here this year, and Captain Y wants it there next year..We specced this versatility for this problem until it's replacement time. The Supply Bed is specced the same way, 1000' of 5" in 50' lengths..We carry 1400' of 4", with room for more, so when Captain X is Chief X, he can get his 5" Supply.

    I may have missed this in the above responses, but look at the inclusion of at least 1 MIV (Hale Master Intake Valve):for the Right hand Intake, per NFPA, right K A..? When the Chickens go running from the Engine, and Leave the Pump Operator by themselves, it allows the Pump Operator to open that Intake without leaving the Panel. Kinda Costly, but Well worth the Investment or the time to look into it.

    Be Safe..and thanks for the Post

    ------------------

  19. #19
    Dalmation90
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Angry

    Good question Fred...
    My main experience has been with our 1995 Engine Tank which is our primary attack piece and has a Class A/B (we don't use B at all) system.
    Our CAFS truck is a 1997 Hummer/Darley Snuffer unit with a relatively low CAFS flow. One of the reasons for the truck was to evaluate CAFS for future trucks...I reckon we where probably (just guessing) one of the first dozen or so departments to role out CAFS in New England.
    So I don't have a CAFS system on a truck we can flow big volumes from too. I will say this...when we crank up the 1.75" to 200psi on the pump with just Class A and a medium-expansion aspirating nozzle adapter on the Task Force Tip...we make an incredible amount of foam! That said, you don't get the light weight of CAFS hose, and I wouldn't want to use that nozzle adaptor interior!



  20. #20
    K A
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    -\=-=Question: With a normal CAFS installation, do you have the option of using full CAFS -OR- just a water + Class A solution without the air? =-\=-==

    Yes you can. Depending on thedesign you can make water, CAFS, Class A and Class B all at the same time out of different lines.

    =-=-I thought that CAFS allowed the operator to change the amount of air flow to adjust the consistency of the resulting foam.-==-

    Yes it does. So if youwant to cool off the room don't use o much air, or spray longer. It can also be done at the nozzle

    =-=-= If you can dial the air down to zero, that should solve the problem of wanting a high water flow for high heat absorbtion situations.=-=-=

    Or just turn the air down a bit and do the sae thing

    =-=-If no, how hard would it be to modify the system to allow for no air input?=-==-

    Turn the valve off at the given line is real quick



  21. #21
    Sledgehammer57
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    A real non-technical suggestion --- paint the chasis WHITE. It really is not that hard to keep clean and it really is so much easier to find any leaks that may develop. Also if you have ever crawled under a rig with a trouble light you will be amazed how much better you can see with a white chasis.

  22. #22
    Pat222
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Well guys, thanks for all your replies on this subject. There are a lot of great ideas that I have seen. Well the truck commitee has gone to the convention and have looked at all manufacturers and we are all leaning towards the American LaFrance Eagle chassis. Even the die hard Pierce guys are impressed with the LaFrance. I have been interested for a while and have kind of been pushing for the Eagle chassis. We all agreed on the extended cab and the raised roof. If anybody out there has an Eagle chassis please send replies regarding the good and the bad that you have experienced with this chassis. Thanks.

  23. #23
    Chops
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    General Reply to any Apparatus Committee:
    A point that is not stressed enough is that apparatus should be designed for current and future needs. The BIGGER is BETTER theory is not usually true in the fire service. Your apparatus should be designed for the way you operate; Traditional Engine, Rescue-Pumper, etc. Making dramatic purchases such as CAFS or other firefigting tactic tools may not be for your operation, more less your apparatus.
    Being in your city, you do have a pretty diverse setting, but urban/suburd none the less. I recommend some of the following that I found useful in a simular department setting I am in now:
    1) Low Hosebeds and Crosslays: Keeping them down allows for easy off loading. If it's high, the F/F's may look past pulling it, citing the extra work geting it down from 2' above their head.
    2) Keep the ladders down: Remember, rescue should be paramount above all other things. When you need ladders, there is no time for shoots, hydraulic racks, or enclosed compartments.
    3) Rear intake: If you utilize front suctions to sleeve hydrants, one on the rear is great. It allows you fast hook-up to hydrants when ducking in an alley or going around the corner on a corner hydrant to allow the truck the front of the building. Wish ours had them.
    4) Single Stack Preconnects: Allows so much more in terms of racking styles. Also, get fully adjustable dividers and plumb all preconnects with 2-1/2" or larger so you can interchange line sizes and lengths without body mods or flow losses.

    Food for thought
    Dan


    [This message has been edited by Chops (edited September 26, 1999).]

  24. #24
    EPFD-AL
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We've got 1995 2000 gpm WS Darley. Fine machine. ABS brakes are wonderful. If you get snow and ice, get automatic snowchains; and if your area gets floods, go with exhaust stacks. We've had problems with our roll-up doors, and wish we didn't get them. We did away with the booster hose and reel when we ordered it ... that was a mistake.

  25. #25
    ProfVol
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Pat222 We have just purchased a KME with 2000 gpm pump and 1000 gal tank. First new truck in 18 yrs. Make sure as other replies mentioned, buy what fits your department. We have a six man cab because it is rare that the first truck leaves with more than 4. To meet ISO standards, we must have 2 pumpers and a truck on structures call, as a volunteer department sometimes during the day you may only have 5 people. This means that not everyone cant ride the new truck. The 1000 tank made a high truck and it is harder to get to the hose. Preconnects are low. We had a problem with compartment size. Make sure your specs. stated size with the compartment door closed. We lost space because of the depth of the compartment doors. Live and learn. The length and the wide of the truck (more storage space, the bigger the truck) makes it harder to get in tight space (driveway to trailers in the country with 8 - 10 ft gates and sharp corners.
    Hope this helps and good luck.

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