1. #1
    mwalshnh
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post Wildland Fire Trucks

    I am wondering if anyone has information on Surplus military HUMVEEs, where to obtain them, and what is involved in converting them for use in Wildland/Brush/SWI Fire Fighting. I am thinking along the lines of seating for 4, 250-300gal tank, pump, hand tool and backpack tanks....please let me know if you have had or know of any departments that have had dealings with this type of endeavor.

    Stay Low - Stay Safe
    Look Up - Look Down - Look Around
    Mike

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  2. #2
    DD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I don't think that Hummers are old enough for the military to have made them excess property. Contact your state Department of Natural Resources for details.

  3. #3
    chief4102
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    The Michigan DNR uses some HUMVEE's. They set them up with tanks, pumps, and class A foam in their owns shops. They buy new, commercial HUMVEEs to convert. All that I have seen use 2 man cabs. Seems there are no surplus units available, even to the State of Michigan. I have seen these work at wildfires, and they do a heck of a good job. There are very few places these units CAN'T go.

    Be Safe

    Dan

  4. #4
    FFtazUFC3
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Angry

    You CAN NOT BUY a military Humvee's!!! You can only buy civilian Humer's!!! Most used/surplus Military Hummvees are either sent back to AM General to be reconditioned or are "De-Militarized" basically the frame and Body and drive train are cut into 4 sections. The engine is kept for spare parts. You may be able to get one from from your state through the GSA Property donation program, in which military surplus is offered to state and local governments but this is EXtremely rare. For more info on this program go to http://pub.fss.gsa.gov/property/propstlst.html and contact the rep for your state. The other alternative is to buy a hummer direct from AM General or a local hummer dealer. They do make a couple different versions of the hummer for fire/rescue/police services.

    <img src=http://www.hummer.com/industrial/photo/images/12.jpg>

    <img src=http://www.hummer.com/industrial/photo/images/16.jpg>

    <img src=http://www.hummer.com/industrial/photo/images/13.jpg>

    <img src=http://www.hummer.com/industrial/photo/images/14.jpg>

    <img src=http://www.hummer.com/industrial/photo/images/16.jpg>

    All of the above pics are from the AM General web site. http://www.hummer.com/industrial/photo/index.html
    [This message has been edited by FFtazUFC3 (edited October 19, 1999).]

    [This message has been edited by FFtazUFC3 (edited October 19, 1999).]

    [This message has been edited by FFtazUFC3 (edited October 19, 1999).]

  5. #5
    chief4102
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    My appologies Mr. Cullen. You are correct. The vehicles that the Michigan DNR BUYS are HUMMERS, my mistake with the improper name.

    Be Safe

  6. #6
    mwalshnh
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Thanks to everyone who has replied so far. If anyone knows the site address, I was surfing the Emergency Web and there was a volunteer FD that somehow got a HUMVEE or HUMMER (free) and completely refurbished it and prepared it for wildland Firefighting for about $8,000. If any of you know the name of this Dept, please let me know.

    Thanks and keep the replies coming.


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  7. #7
    FFtazUFC3
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Wink

    Chief Dan, No appologies necessary. My appologies to you sir. It was not my intention to offend, just merely pointing out a common mistake that many people make. thinking that the civilian and military versions are the same vehicle. Again my applogies.

    Another option for you MWalshnh is to check w/ your local National Guard. You might be able to con the OIC into donating one. And he might be able to get around the demilitarization codes. Just a thought.

    [This message has been edited by FFtazUFC3 (edited October 20, 1999).]

  8. #8
    Dalmation90
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    99.5% sure one of the towns that got a surplus Humvee was Ashburham, MA -- and that was just some real good luck (and some really good connections I suspect). Very few are being surplused yet.

    Check the weight ratings...300 gallons on a four man Humvee may be pushing it depending on what else you carry. We have a two man Hummer, 200gallons water, 10 gallons foam, Snuffer CAFS unit, EMS equipment, and a couple air-packs and it's right out at the GVW. If you're buying a new Hummer, they now have a higher GVW model that came out the model year after ours that would have been perfect for the load we carry.
    Matt

  9. #9
    ks_wildlandfire
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Our information is that the military will repair Humvee's up to 85% of their acquisition cost due to the fact that the vehicles are so new to the military system. Some may trickle out over the next few years but they are probably going to be in very poor shape.

    We have one surplus Humvee in a volunteer department in the state but do not know where it came from.

    Also, our information is that military Humvee's and civilian Hummer's are the same basic vehicle with some additional comfort features added to the civilian Hummer. Military versions are also only available with diesel motors where as civilian versions are available with gasoline motors.

  10. #10
    FF McDonald
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation

    Gentlemen-

    Having spent 6 years on active duty with the U.S. Marine Corps, and having worked on countless military vehicles ( My MOS, Military Occupational Specialty- was as a heavy equipment mechanic) I feel that I am qualified to answer a few questions here.

    Surplus military vehicles are available, however-- the HMMWV (High Mobility Multi Purpose Wheeled Vehicle) is not available. Also the information that ks_wildlandfire provides is correct. The military- (all branches) will repair up to a high rate of cost, and if they are turned into DRMO (Defense Reutilization / Marketing Office) they are de-militarized according to federal law.

    There is also a vast difference between a military and a civilian 'Hummer'. The three main areas are:
    Crashworthiness
    Soundproofing
    Electrical System

    1. Military 'Hummers' do not fall perfectly into the NHTSA plans. They do not have to meet crashworthiness standards. Civilian vehicles do.
    2. Anyone who has ridden in a tactical vehicle can attest to a total and complete lack of soundproofing. Civilian vehicles have to meet Federal standards in regard to soundproofing.
    3. Last is the electrical system. All military vehicles, from generators, to tactical vehicles to heavy equipment, all the way up to Armor (tanks) have a 24V electrical system. Granted, many of the larger road vehicles; 18 wheelers, fire-trucks, ambulances, dump-trucks, etc... also have 24V electrical systems, this is due to the specific needs of that vehicle. The majority of civilian vehicles are manufactured w/ 12V electrical systems. To include... you guessed, the civilian models of the 'Hummer'

    Don't overlook the vast amount of military vehicles that are available through DRMO. Many a fire department has built a SWI/ Wildland/ Brush truck with a former military 6x6. Sure, it won't look as cool as a "HUMMER" but it will be bigger (which has its advantages) and may suit your needs better(carrying more equipment)

    Hope the information helped....

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Default firefighting HUMV's

    We have one.. I work at the Army's National Training Center/ Fort Irwin Fire Department (Ca.) as a contract firefighter. After the gulf war of 91 we acquired one on a permenant hand reciept from the operations Group Commander for the sole purpose of modifying it at our expense for firefighting on the ranges. Because the cab is not enclosed it does not comply with NFPA requirements for motorized apparatus. This prohibits it's use off the installation for mutual aid with the surrounding agencies. With a 160 gal tank and 60 gpm pump we are able to mobile attack 50 acres before reservicing. Mobility and durabilty are not its weakness, it's the courage & skill level of the operator.

  12. #12
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    Default

    Give the man the "Resurrection with the Answer to the Question no one asked" award.

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by neiowa View Post
    Give the man the "Resurrection with the Answer to the Question no one asked" award.
    I think we are going to have to come up with a name for this phenomenon of old threads coming back to life.

    I like "the Lazarus effect"...
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  14. #14
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    Join Date
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    9

    Default Hummer info

    USFS Roscommon Equipment Center has a report entitled "Evaluating the HUMMER and HMMWV Series Chassis for Wildland Engine Use."

    Go to:
    http://www.roscommonequipmentcenter....ects/rec56.pdf

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