1. #1
    Resq14
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb Interesting Trucks

    Many of you have probably seen these trucks as they've appeared in the trade magazines.

    I just want to make sure everyone has a chance to see these unique creations. I think there are a TON of good ideas on these trucks. While they're kinda swiss army knife-ish and built to serve VERY specific purposes, I think we can all learn some things from these designs. I think it also beautifully illustrates how thorough planning, spec'ing, and follow-through can produce exactly what was wanted, especially with such unique apparatus.

    Both departments did a very nice job documenting their processes and final outcomes on the net.

    Thanks for taking the time to share!

    Rattlesnake, Colorado FD http://www.geocities.com/Baja/Trails/7873/

    Fallon-Churchill, Nevada FD http://www.geocities.com/Baja/Trails/6658

  2. #2
    jemar
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Very Good!! I hope to see more of this!

  3. #3
    Eng 48
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    NICE! I'll send in pictures of our new piece as soon as I get them developed and scanned.

    ------------------
    Be safe everyone!

  4. #4
    LHS*
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    ///While they're kinda swiss army knife-ish and built to serve VERY specific purposes,///

    Our 7 rigs Fallon and Rattlesnake were actually built to service a wide variety of needs not really one specific purpose. You swiss army knofe is right.

    The design goal was simple, make every task we expect them to address as easy as possible.

    After 0ver 100,000 miles of actual use, they've been great brush trucks, excellent at getting a draft from a water source up to 500 feet from the pumper with asmuch as a 120 foot lift. All lay hose well out to 5200 feet, have proven very effective on a whole range of flamable liquid fires, do a pretty fair job on structure protection, are the primary extrication peices, and handle all structure fires.

    Look for Annaville, TX to one up Fallon and Rattlesnake, they were just out here and have ordered a fleet of 11 rigs way beyond these units.

  5. #5
    Resq14
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Wink

    Hey LHS*

    Sorry 'bout that... what I meant was that they were designed to fill a special need required by the community they serve. In this respect, I commend the design team for addressing these issues. I do think that your needs are specific to your community, just as we all have needs specific to our own communities. Granted, many are probably the same. Anyhow, that's what I meant to say.

    In no way did I mean to imply the trucks were not versatile, not flexible, or limited in their response abilities.

    =)

  6. #6
    ffeng
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Hey LHS - what planet is Fallon on? It can't be on earth. "... draft with as much as a 120 ft of lift." Not on earth you won't. When you create a vacuum in your pumps, you've got atmospheric pressure at 14.7 psi lifting water up into the pump and the most 14.7 psi is going to lift a column of water is about 33-34 ft. and that's if everything is perfect. 14.7 psi = about 33-34 ft. of head. I know you would just love to claim that the Fallon trucks can even draft at heights more than the earth's atmosphere will allow, but your dreaming.
    Please respond, I am interested to see one of your responses where you highlight my reply sentence by sentence and "teach" me the errors of my ways.

  7. #7
    LHS*
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    ///120 ft of lift." Not on earth you won't.

    Oh.

    //When you create a vacuum in your pumps, you've got atmospheric pressure at 14.7 psi lifting water up into the pump and the most 14.7 psi is going to lift a column of water is about 33-34 ft. and that's if everything is perfect. 14.7 psi = about 33-34 ft. of head.//

    I see.

    /// I know you would just love to claim that the Fallon trucks can even draft at heights more than the earth's atmosphere will allow, but your dreaming. //

    //Please respond, I am interested to see one of your responses where you highlight my reply sentence by sentence and "teach" me the errors of my ways.//

    You must use hard suction hose when you draft. We aren't able to carry more than 120 feet per rig, so we simply use high lift strainers and soft hose.

    You know, lay a pair of 5 inch supply lines in a forward lay from the ditch or quarry, and pump one line into the strainer and get 2 to 3 times the water back out. Not a new idea, its been in use at least 70 years. It takes a bit of time to deploy but in about 3 minutes we have flow.

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