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  1. #1
    DRA-252
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Air Conditioned Cabs

    My VFD is on a long and tortuous journey spec'ing out a new rescue or rescue-pumper. Since I am relatively unimportant, I generally keep my mouth shut. We had a call on a 90+ day with high humidity that I really wished we had A/C.

    I'm thinking of suggesting of getting A/C in the new vehicle for use as a Rehab area since our rescue rolls on all fires. Has anyone any experience with this? Would going into a cold environment be harmful to someone just coming out of fire situation?

    Thanks.


  2. #2
    SDFDTREMINES
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Originally posted by DRA-252:
    My VFD is on a long and tortuous journey spec'ing out a new rescue or rescue-pumper. Since I am relatively unimportant, I generally keep my mouth shut. We had a call on a 90+ day with high humidity that I really wished we had A/C.

    I'm thinking of suggesting of getting A/C in the new vehicle for use as a Rehab area since our rescue rolls on all fires. Has anyone any experience with this? Would going into a cold environment be harmful to someone just coming out of fire situation?

    Thanks.

  3. #3
    WillB
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Go for it! Our new Freightliner FL112 pumper tanker has A/C for rehab etc. It was a welcomed addition by everyone in the dept

  4. #4
    Dalmatian90
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Would going into a cold environment be harmful to someone just coming out of fire situation?

    Yup. People wouldn't have as many war stories about having to go to the hospital with heat exhaustion.

    How cold is it going to be? 60? 65? 70? We're not talking about a meatlocker here! Go in, cool off, rehydrate, get your vitals taken, go back to relieve the crews working.


  5. #5
    tmnkwd
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    In the late 80's early 90's, my department was one of the first in our area to get an A/C cab. Pretty progressive back then. Now, that seems to be pretty much the standard outfit with a new order. The main reason is the rehab. Face it, you don't get A/C to go along with the plush interior and smooth ride! The added cost is not as much as you might think. If the cost will make or break the deal, drop all the gold leaf trim and other fancy add on's that do nothing for safety.

    Stay cool!

  6. #6
    570eck
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We have ac in our rescue, engine and are specing it in a new quint. As far as health concerns, if you cool off too fast your body loses it's core temp and has to work harder to regain it. For the most part ac will not cause a problem with this, but if you add ice cold water and ac this could be a problem. We recenlty used our rescue as rehab at a haz-mat with temps in the high 80's humidity near 90 and dewpoint in mid 70's, you can imagine how hot the guys coming out of suits were with the heat index near 100 outside the suits. We had no problem but they also had to go to medical and debreifing before they hit the rescue. So let them cool off a little before throwing them straight in.

  7. #7
    WRENCH
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    First thing ,to eliminate people calling it a luxury, list it as climate control for rehab purposes.On our new pumper we had todo this to get it past town council.

    Once you got that far above all make sure you throughly research the sizes and make and styles of climate controls-A/C.

    If you under size it to save a buck you will have constant problems with the unit as well the complianing because it doesnt cool right.

    On a 90 deg day with high humiditynothing going towork really good ,just one of them things, but contact some a/c manuf. they have charts and graphs to help try to select the right one. Dont listen to the apparatus salesmen they only want to sell you whats right and convient for them.

  8. #8
    Billy Mott
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Here in the Tampa Bay area of Sunny Humid Fl. the conditions described by DRA 252 are common place starting in mid May and running up till Sept. My dept. has all fully enclosed cabs with "Climate Controlled Cabs" as my Chief likes to say. We don't use the A/C to much for fire scene rehab, some do, under a shade tree with lots of fluids and we have a water misting fan that works really good. However Fire Fighting rehab is not the only time air-conditioned cabs come in handy. Sometimes when we have extended calls for HazMat, overturned tankers, fire watch, brush fire patrol,and the like, these units keep us in much better shape than without.Even on an everyday basises we are out in the heat doing our daily chores (hydrant,business,residential inspections, smoke detector installations, shopping etc.) We don't have to put up with terribly cold winters here but on the reverse side a fully enclosed heated cab also has the same benifits.

  9. #9
    d308
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Departments in my area use ambulances for this purpose. The "Climate Control" is a big help when the tempreature is 100+. I think it would work just as well with the rescue.

    Hope this Helps

  10. #10
    mike021
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We speced into our new engine. Wouldn't think twice about not getting it. We dropped it on the Ladder truck specs years ago and it costs us big bucks to add about a year ago to the ladder. Spec it now.

    ------------------
    Norwood Fire Co. No. 1
    http://www.nfco1.freeservers.com

  11. #11
    Looper
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We've been getting A/C on all of our vehicles for the last 15 yrs. In southeast Texas, A/C is not a luxury, it is a necessity. 95+ degree/ 95% humidity days are common during the summer. Last year, we had a 2-alarm house fire on the hottest day of the year -- 113 degrees!

    Sure, it costs a little more in the beginning and it requires some maint, but it is definately worth it. Our old rescue (just replaced) was a walk-in and was used for rehab at fires, until all of the engines got A/C units.

  12. #12
    Fire/Rescue43
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We first got A/C in our Tanker as it came as a standard option on the Peterbilt chassis we ordered. A year later when specing out our new Rescue we added A/C for rehab purposes. I doubt we will ever order another piece of appratus that does not have A/C.

    Roll up doors with electric openers, power windows, AM/FM,CD are luxruy items on appratus, A/C is a must in my book.

    Stay safe

  13. #13
    Bulldog
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    I too am from Louisville. Many units in Jefferson County have AC in their cabs or Rescues. I know form Personal experience that Lake Dreamland even has a completely Rehab unit they use for extended Haz-Mat runs. I see no reason not to get it and many to. Just have your truck committee talk to some of the surrounding departments.

  14. #14
    Billy Mott
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Another piece of experiance, put the a/c condensers on the roof. When they get put under the vehicle they get clogged with dirt pretty quick and then they don't work so good.

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