1. #1
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    BALLWIN MO. ST.LOUIS CO.
    Posts
    3

    Default WHEN SHOULD YOU REPLACE A FIRETRUCK

    OUR DEPARTMENT IS ATTEMPTING TO PLAN OUR FUTURE, IN AN ORGANIZED WAY. THE PROBLEM WE ARE HAVING IS FINDING INFORMATION ON WHAT IS A GOOD RULE OF THUMB FOR REPLACING APPARATUS. WHAT IS YOUR RESON FOR REPLACEMENT, MILEAGE, AGE, DUSTY, WHAT? PLEASE GIVE ME YOUR OPINION, OR A PLACE WHERE I MIGHT FIND SOME INFO.

    THANKS.

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Wheaton IL
    Posts
    1,765

    Default

    It all depends on how busy you are. Around 10 years we try to get it out of front line service, and try to get it out the door around 20 years.
    Our new engine, should be delivered next mo, is a lease. so at 7 years the lease is up and we are probably sending it back then. If the rig is outstanding we may purchase it but it will probably be placed in reserve at that time.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    N2DFire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    S.W. Virginia
    Posts
    1,286

    Default

    Although this is about to change (at least acording to current rumor), the county I run in tries to purchase each dept. a new truck every five years. Since most (if not all) Dept.s have 3 Trucks (not incl. brus/utility type units) this means that we try to replace a truck after 15 years.

    Now - that's the theory.

    The truth of the matter is that each year the Department (or Departments) that are up for a new truck have their needs evaluated aginst all the other areas and if someone else needs a truck more than you - then you get bumped.

    Our tanker was just replaced in Nov. 2000 - the truck it replaced was a 1972 Oren and it was transfered to our outpost station (which just started a few years ago) and is still in active service.

    As long as the truck passes all required inspections for safety - the insurance Company will allow us to continue to run it.

    Now - just as some background Info - my Dept. runs somewher between 100 - 125 calls/year (No EMS) so milage and Wear & Tear are lower.

    Take Care - Stay Safe
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

  4. #4
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Houston area
    Posts
    106

    Default

    A good rule of thumb for apparatus replacement is anytime the apparatus has an E-One logo anywhere on it, it's time for a new truck...
    These are my opinions and not those of the organizations for which I work and/or volunteer.

  5. #5
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Houston area
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Of course, if you're replacing an E-One, a good start would be two nuns and a super soaker (full of holy water if possible). You can keep the change.
    These are my opinions and not those of the organizations for which I work and/or volunteer.

  6. #6
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1

    Default

    E-ONE-SUX-*****, now that is TRUE about the replacement. I wonder what you could get for a used E-ONE that is just a year old. Who in their right mind would do such a thing to there department.

    Champ

  7. #7
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    BALLWIN MO. ST.LOUIS CO.
    Posts
    3

    Default

    THANKS FOR THE REPLIES. A LITTLE BACKGROUND ON OUR TRUCKS. WE RUN BOTH FIRE AND EMS, APROX 5000 CALLS PER YEAR. OUR TRUCKS AVERAGE ABOUT 10,000 MILE PER YEAR, AMBULANCES ABOUT 20,000. DOES YOUR DEPT. GO BY MILEAGE OR AGE?

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
    N2DFire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    S.W. Virginia
    Posts
    1,286

    Default

    We go more by age and over all condition of the trucks than mileage. I remember when the Dept. replaced an old '66 Ford Pumper (back in the mid 90's say 96) and it had under 50K miles on it and the majority of those miles were from where it sat pumping. (It was configured such that it actually rolled on miles sitting still in pump gear).

    So deduct all the pumping miles and that truck (which was in the third out position anyway) probably had less than 25K miles with 30 years of service life.

    One other point to consider in your life cycle equation is what kind of Preventative Maintenance program you have. If your rigs are getting serviced & lubed, oil & filter changes, etc at the proper intervals - this will go a long way to keeping a "high mileage" truck in good running condition.

    Once again - I hope I have given you good food for though. If you have more questions then post them here or feel free to e-mail me.

    Take Care - Stay Safe
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic

    [ 08-15-2001: Message edited by: N2DFire ]
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    CAPN22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Blackfalds, AB, CAN
    Posts
    186

    Default

    Milage means very little in the age of a fire appartus. You really need to look at engine hours. The fire service has adopted a simple formula based on severity of duty and operating conditions of a fire appartus. 1 hour on the meter = 72 miles. If your unit does not have an engine hour meter but does have a pump hour meter. Use the same formula for pump hours and add to the odometer reading. Not as good a method as the engine hour meter but gives you a good idea of the real milage of the unit.

    Up here the standards are set by the IAO, Insurer's Advisory Organization. Similar to ISO in the States. They maintain that a piece of equipment should be front line for no more that 15 years and reserve, back up, 2nd line for no more than 5 years there-after. They also recognize that smaller communites may not be able to replace apparatus on a 20 year cycle and have a very stringent performance certification that the units should be tested and inspected to every year after the initial 15 years inorder to maintian your municipal insurance rating.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register