Thread: Hot Shields?

  1. #1
    Brat
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    Question Hot Shields?

    Does anyone have any experience with using a Hot Shield mask? Are they worth the $75 cost. At present we just use bandannas. They help quite a lot in bad smoke. I was thinking of getting a Hot Shield for my brother, also a firefighter, for his birthday. Thanks in advance for any helpful info.



  2. #2
    RxFire
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    Post

    First off - I have never used one, but from what Ihave heard from co-workers who have used them, they restrict airflow, are hot to wear, and don't filter really any better than a bandana....they don't do anything for filtering out Carbon Monoxide.

    Some people really like them though I hear.

    They may help with getting into a hot area during I/A, but maybe you don't really need to be that close to start with.

    Just passing along what I've heard.


    RxFire

  3. #3
    SWIDFCWINS
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Red face

    About the Hot Shields...I have field tested the item. I find that it helps to some extent, but like anything that a firefighter wears on his/her face, it gets hot and causes a slight air restriction. It is better than a bandana, for sure. I also used the Hot Shield during a blow up and fire storm incident in Montana this past summer. (See the October issue of FIREHOUSE Magazine, Pages 38-42) It was a big help then. There is yet another product on the market that looks similar to the Hot Shield. It is called, Whiffs. I have only tried this item on and have not used it during a fire incident. I do not and will not endorse any products for obvious reasons. It is up to the individual to try products and to determine what is best for the individual.

    ------------------
    DFCWINS

  4. #4
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    I just bought one of these last month. It does help a great deal with heat and does a good job filtering smoke. I don't wear it unless I absolutely need too. But in conjunction with an open face helmet shroud I feel it was $75 well spent.
    Steve
    Proud member of the IACOJ
    SUA SPONTE
    "I've got no respect for any young man who won't join the colors."
    ~Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, CSA

  5. #5
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    Brat the hot shield is worth its weight in gold, I was in Nevada a few years ago and was almost in a burn over, a few of us had them and we were doing great when everyone else was coughing, also got the chance to use it in Idaho as well when we starting sucking smoke.

    I mostly wear it when doing burn outs or when the smoke starts to get thick, but I keep it in my cargo pocket on my pants.

    Ok now about the whiffs product, I would not wear one or not let a friend wear one, if you take a bean bag chair and take out the little beads on the inside, that is what the whiffs mask is made out of. Also they have nylon on the mask, right in front so if things get a little hot, it will start on fire. The company has some good sales people, they tried to sell the mask to us, but once we did a little testing and talked with others we found out what its really made out of.

    Also I heard that the Forest Service and CDF are going to make it so you cant wear a whiffs mask on a fire, due to what its made out of.

    Stay Safe, and remember lots of running will help you this next fire season!

  6. #6
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    Smketer, Our fire season is here. Our VFD ran 3 times yesterday (Saturday). The first 2 were from controlled burns that flared up in the wind (58 mph). They were small, a couple of acres each. The 3rd fire was about 240 acres. It was in grass and standing corn. A pile of 96 big round bales also burned.

    Back on the subject, we got Hot Shields. I don't wear mine unless it getting really hot. They keep the heat off your face alot better than a bandana and a face and neck protecter. A neighboring department had a new firefighter blister his face, second degree burns, when they drove in a wash-out with a type 6 and he tried to spray water into the wind to keep himself cool when a fast moving grass fire burned then over. The truck was not hurt at all but he steamed his face. Their VFD has some Hot Shields but he never had one on. The other firefighter just jumped in the truck and was fine. The rookie had training but paniced and didn't realize how hot a little grass fire can get. The moral of the story is don't make a whole series of rookie mistakes and always have your gear handy. A Hot Shield is just another good tool in the wildland firefighter tool box (pack).

  7. #7
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    Brat,
    Sounds like your fire season is off to a good start, I thought SD did not burn until late July or August?

    What was a burn doing going on with gust of winds to in the 50's.

    Does your dept follow or try to follow the 18 and 8?



    I heard new mexico and Az are looking for people now, lighting strikes are just tearing it up down there.
    Hot Shot crews and smoke jumpers are going down as of 1400 today.

    Stay Safe,

  8. #8
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    Smketer, We are normally wet this time of the year. We are way behind on moisture. There is rain forecast for this weekend and we should get some. We have our pack test this weekend. It rains the first time we schedule the test every year. Most of South Dakota could use a couple inches of rain so we would be glad to postpone for rain.

    The VFD's around us in south central South Dakota have an initial attack agreement with the Rosebud Agency (BIA) and the FMO at Rosebud is real good about helping with training and safety issues. We owe Gene a lot for the help in wildland fire training and equipment. We try to use the 10 and 18 at all fires and all trainings. Our firefighter safety has improved alot in the last few years.

    I learned tonight that the second fire last saturday was set in 2 old standing trees about 25 days earlier. We had a light dusting of snow on the trees the day after they were burned and the land owner figured they were out cold. He was wrong. Luck was on his side though as neighbors saw the smoke and kept it from getting away until we got there. All we had to do was mop up.

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