Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
Closed Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    jipfbutter
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Grad Student looking for help with Firefighter and EMS study

    Hi! I am a Graduate Student at Ohio State University. I am studying Anthropology and Communication. I am currently working on a study that looks at Firefighters and EMS workers that deal with a cross cultural and Non English speaking communities. I am hoping that some of you are willing to share so of your many experiences with me. The intended purpose of this study is to create and implement new programs in ESL(English as a Second Language) classrooms that would better instruct students how to communicate with EMS and Firefighters. It would also seek to implement courses for EMS and Firefighters to deal with nonEnglish speaking or cross cultural situations.
    Thanks!


  2. #2
    firefly1361
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    First off let me welcome you to the forums. I have had several experiences working with non-english speaking people since I work for a private ambulance company. One experience that stands out in my mind happened several months ago. I was picking up a patient at one local hospital in Baltimore City to take them to Johns Hopkins Hospital for Radiation treatment. The patient and her family were from a country that speaks Arabic, therefore the patient didn't speak english. She was very sick and since neither she nor her daughter(who was accompanying her) spoke english, there could have been serious problems with communication had the patient coded. There were a few problems with communication during this transport. The daughter was trying to give her mother water and I told her she would have to wait the daughter was very confused and became angry. The transport was succesful and when we arrived at Johns Hopkins they provided an Arabic Translator for the patient and her family. I wish you luck with your study and if you have any questions please feel free to E-mail me @ firefly1361@hotmail.com Take care and stay safe.

    Heather Helm
    ff/emt-b


    ------------------
    "If You go, We go"

    [This message has been edited by firefly1361 (edited October 03, 2000).]

    [This message has been edited by firefly1361 (edited October 03, 2000).]

  3. #3
    Baberems
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Great topic! During the summer for 8-10 weeks I manage an emergent care station in a fish camp in a remote part of Alaska. It is an extremely cultural diverse community. There are many different languages that are spoken. English, Russian, Yupik, Tagolog, Figian, Japanese, and Spanish are common.
    I will start by saying that I cannot carry on a conversation in any of the above languages except english. Over the years I have picked upbits and pieces.I do have a chart with phrases common to illness and injury in Spanish. Pain, illness and suffering seem to have no language barriers. Pointing to body parts, gesturing and patience have been my mainstay in doing field assessments on the patients I encounter. I often feel as tho' I'm playing charades. Equally challenging is attempting to figure out what medications they are taking as the script information is written in their native language. Some observations I have made over the years are as follows.

    1- All blood is red and the sight of it is upsetting no matter where you're from.
    2- Do not assume that a patient who speaks a different language from you is deaf. Shouting will not make them understand you any better.
    3- Be in tune to facial expression and body language.
    4- In some cultures looking a person in the eye is a sign of disrespect. Do not interpret lack of eye contact as a sign of lack of trust, disinterest or evasiveness.
    5- When patients have a private concern, they will often avoid the use of an interpreter.
    6- Patience pays. Patients seem most appreciative when an effort is made to take the time necessary to evaluate their situation.
    7- Appreciate the cutural attempts they have made to care for themselves. Tho' I'm sure that it is possible, I have yet to see a culture based remedy or treatment that is causing the patient harm.
    The American Red Cross used to have a publication that had medical phrases in many different languages. I believe it was used by their disaster relief staff and volunteers. Don't know if it is still available.

    Good luck with your project. feel free to E-Mail me at Baberems@aol.com if I can be of further help.

    Good Luck with your project.

    Pam Baber NREMT-P

  4. #4
    kmnader
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Please contact me - I majored in Anthro in college and I am also FF/PM. I would be interested in helping you out with this.

    Kris

  5. #5
    BOMBERODAVE
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    WOW! THIS IS AN EYE OPENER.
    FIRST OF ALL I LIVE IN AN AREA THAT IS ABOUT
    90% SPANISH SPEAKING (I LIVE ON THE SOUTHERN MOST TIP OF TEXAS) SO WE HAVE NO PROBLEM, EXCEPT WITH THOSE 10%. WE EITHER HOPE FOR A TRANSLATOR, OR PLAY CHARADES AND HOPE WE WIN. WITH THE WAY OUR CITIES DOWN HERE ARE BECOMING MORE DIVERSE BEING BILINGUAL ISN'T CUTTING IT ANYMORE. THANKS FOR THE QUESTION IT HAS MADE ME THINK ON BETTER WAYS TO HELP WITH IN MY DEPT.

    BAGES WE DON'T NEED NO STINKING BAGES!

  6. #6
    URSULAFORHAN
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    This is more of an aside--- the problems of dealing with folks who aren't "neurologically typical". One of my relatives has a pain threshold of a granite boulder. She will cheerily joke with the ER staff while bleeding profusely from a scalp wound or, even better, pull off the drape so she can see what they are doing.
    As to ESL situations, I echo what the others say, and add that in some cultures (Hmong for example)you DO NOT ever pat someone on the end--- it's like giving someone the evil eye.

  7. #7
    URSULAFORHAN
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Ooops -- I meant to say pat someone on the HEAD---- My freudian slip of the day!!!! Sorry!

  8. #8
    TruroFAO
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    jipfbutter-

    I myself graduated from OSU in June with a BA in Political Science. I would encourage you to utilize several area fire stations which may be able to help you. Stations 7 and 13 are both first due on sections of the OSU campus, and could probably tell you about the experiences you are looking for. Additionally, station 6, which is at Maple Cnyon and 161, would also probably be of help. Much of that area is of Hispanic decent. The same could be said of station 24, which is just down the street from 6. Also, Any of the Washington Township stations (91-95) in the Dublin area may be able to help you. Dublin has a large Asian population...If you need directions, feel free to contact me.

    Best wishes-

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts