Closed Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 Last
  1. #1
    cjpconlin
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post Should EMS wear Bunker Gear on MVAs??

    I think that protective clothing is extremely important in all types of responses. Most private ambulance services in Alberta do not provide adequate protective clothing to their members, and those of us fortunate enough to be on a municipal EMS/Fire service sometimes take it for granted.
    What do you think??


    [This message has been edited by cjpconlin (edited 12-19-2000).]

  2. #2
    Fireboy422
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Really it's your butt out there, I'd try to protect it as much as I can. I think EMS should wear more than a coat and helmet, if they even wear that. And if they don't want to wear protective clothing, stay out of the way untill we get the person away from the hazards. It all ends up being your butt out there, what level of protection do you want?

    -FF D. Betka
    NSFD
    Norton Shores, MI

  3. #3
    BOMBERODAVE
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I WITHOUT A DOUBT AGREE WITH BUNKERS OR SOME TYPE OF PRTECTIVE EQUIPMENT, I WORE MINE WHEN I RODE THE BOXES IN MY FORMER DEPARTMENT.I GOT LAUGHED AT BUT, OH WELL I NEVER NEEDED A TETNES SHOT! (WESLACO F.D./E.M.S.)

    MOST PRIVATE COMPANIES DOWN HERE DO NOT EVEN THINK OF IT, IT'S NOT COST EFFECTIVE.
    THEY DO THE OLD BUTTON UP SHIRT, EMS PANT RESPONCE, BUT THEY GET INTO VEHICLES TO START LINES AN TO HELP HOLD TRACTION.WHO KNOWS WHAT THE GET INTO CONTACT WITH????!!!!
    I HOPE TEXAS BECOMES A O.S.H.A. STATE BUT AGAIN IT WOULD NOT BE COST EFFECTIVE FOR THE STATE. GO FIGURE???!!!

  4. #4
    Diane
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    We all know the saying....better safe than sorry.....If firefighters wear bunker gear than why shouldn't everyone else assisting hands-on at an MVA?

  5. #5
    snowball
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    YES period.

    ------------------
    ??? Did I say that ???

  6. #6
    cjpconlin
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Most services in Alberta do not have the luxury of having enough hands on scene...Be it an MVA or MCI. With exposure to the mechanism of Injury, as Fire and EMS are, everybody can be of assistance. During long extrications, it is rare to see EMS standing around...They are usually trying to help, and in doing so, become exposed to the potential for injury. It should be mandatory for all providers to be equipt with suitable protective clothing.

    ------------------

  7. #7
    Firediver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    HHHMNMMMM Let's see. Broken Glass, jagged metal. You do the math. GET SOME GEAR

  8. #8
    Fire29_1999
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    No brainer if you ask me,I can't agree more with firediver jagged metal, broken glass,blood, if it is not supplied by the department, how much is your health worth? A lot of times you can find an old set of turn outs at a garage sale, give it a try.
    stay safe

  9. #9
    Fire29_1999
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    No brainer if you ask me,I can't agree more with firediver jagged metal, broken glass,blood, if it is not supplied by the department, how much is your health worth? A lot of times you can find an old set of turn outs at a garage sale, give it a try.
    stay safe

  10. #10
    Fire29_1999
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Just how much does a person value their health? That is the facter to tell you if you should have ppe for MVA's. I can't agree more with firediver broken glass, jagged metal, blood, life is to short not to take any and all precautions that are/should be available, a person can sometimes find turnouts at garage sales.
    stay safe

  11. #11
    sponge
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    There is an inbetween alternative to full bunker gear vs street clothes. There are a few companies out there making nomex jump suits that run only about $250 vs $1000 or so for structural bunker gear. While I wouldn't want to run into a burning building wearing one, they are NFPA/OSHA approved for extrication and have some heat protection in case someone decides to take the fuel line and a couple wires with the cutters. They also give you a lot more flexibility than standard bunker gear.
    I've seen a few guys wearing them, and think it's worth looking into, especially for EMS and non-structural firefighters involved in MVAs.

  12. #12
    Aerial 131
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Do not forget chemicals, feet being smashed or rolled on, things that go boom, air bags, whatever else.

    Also, which cheaper: $1200 for turnouts or 6-12+ weeks off duty with the company paying the cost of time off. Duh!!

    Don Zimmerman

  13. #13
    Aerial 131
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Don't forget chemical, vehicles that move when they should not, things that go boom, airbags, etc.

    Which is cheaper: $1200 turnouts or 6-12+ weeks of time off for the injury which the company insurance is going to have to pay for. Duh!!

    Don Zimmerman

  14. #14
    superzig311
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Here in Lemont, IL, all personnel on scene will be in turnout gear, period. If not, you stay out of the way.

  15. #15
    GCFD/EMS
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Arrow

    My Dept does provide for all our casual non-fire members, but it is quite interesting during mutual aide with our private neighbors watching the EMS guys jump in without any regard for themselves...Kinda sad considering the first thing you learn in EMS is SCENE SAFETY! Funny watching their faces when they are told to watch.

  16. #16
    Scottie Schmidt
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    hi, I am not totally sure but i believe at my station you are not a loud to wear gear on the ambulance due to the fact that it is dirty and the worry of infection.

  17. #17
    Cain
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    Our squad's SOP is mandatory bunker gear with helmet and eye protection (not just a shield) for EVERYONE that is involved with the extrication. The Ambulance service does not use bunker gear but they would just as soon let us do the dirty work anyway. As someone else above said glass, sharps, battery acid, gasoline, blood, not to mention the potential for fire. I would not risk getting even the smallest scratch at the scene of an MVA.

    ------------------
    Remember plan "B"

  18. #18
    Cain
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Our rescue squad's SOP requires FULL bunker gear complete with helmet and eye protection (not just a shield) for all members involved with the extrication. I would not risk getting even a small scratch from the scene of an MVA. Somebody above mentioned all the potential hazards at a scene: glass, sharps, battery acid, fuel, blood, not to mention the potential for fire. Better safe than sorry!!

    ------------------
    Remember plan "B"

  19. #19
    DeputyChief673
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    WITHOUT A DEALT...IT IS YOU THAT IS TAKING A RISK CONTRACTING SOMETHING THAT WILL COST YOU YOUR LIFE... I REQUIRE ALL MY PERSONAL TO BE IN COMPLETE TURNOUT (EXCEPT S.C.B.A.,UNLESS HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS ARE PRESENT) IF THEY ARE WORKING AT ANY M.V.A. I THINK IT IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT OUR FIRE AND EMS PERSONAL AT ANY COST!!!!!

  20. #20
    EMS_Rookie
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    This is a tough one for me to answer. I'm all for protective clothing—to an extent. I get my share of wearing big bulky bunker gear on fires and car wrecks when responding as a firefighter. Now if I'm responding as an EMT the gear gets left in the trunk because it slows me down.

    Now you might think thats stupid and you can go ahead and think that. Its your opinion and you're entitled to it. I find it hard enough to manuever in a van ambulance, like what my private service uses, without bunker gear let alone with it. I might as well just stay outside the squad as small as those rear doors are because I'm a larger fellow and once you put bunker gear on me forget it.

    Now my volunteer squad has modular ambulances and in those I might consider it. There's more room to move around in one so it wouldn't be as bad.

    If I had to wear something I'd try one of those extrication jumpsuits. But full bunker gear? Probably not. I know safety is an issue but full bunkers make it harder to perform our job, especially with some of the terrain around here.

  21. #21
    Big T
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    A question for this question.. What if your a volunteer EMS service with hardly any money.. And you work with a Volunteer Fire Dept. That does have bunker gear. But has no one trained to extracate victims.. And doesnt want to.. We cannot afford 1,000 bunker gear..
    ??????????????????????????????????????

  22. #22
    mike021
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    I'm for fire gear on a MVA, especially when it's a extrication. No matter what i ALWAYS have my full turnout gear with me on the Rig and always have my bunkers on. beside's chicks dig a man in fire gear hehe.

  23. #23
    Andy Henne
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    YES, YES, YES... EMTs, Paramedics, etc. need protection too...!

    Andy

    Chievres AB Fire/Rescue
    Belgium

  24. #24
    KS.KE,EMT/FIRE/RESC
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Coming form both sides of the fence, I belive that it is a must to have the proper protection on a MVC. Responding as both resc. and EMS depending on the day I've been caught both ways. It is very comforting to not worry about catching your clothes or worse your skin on any assortment of objects I teach a extrication class for the new emt students and in the class I require all PPC for everyone involved. To get use to the EMS side in Full turnouts is a learned thing just like anything else as a scene, SO don't give me that line that you can't provide proper care for the pt's in full gear. You can't provide full care if your worried about the glass stuck in your knee or that 2" laceration to your forearm and the pt's blood is everywhere. DEPT. heads let's talk cost. Everyones got old bunkers, store them in an outside compartment on the rig or keep them at the house, they're still useful. Try to imagine nine base workups from one MVC, We did, Pt has hep-c, nine personell didn't follow proper personal protection measures, rubber gloves and bloody glass don't mix...

    ------------------
    M. Cory Myers
    EMT-I/FF/RESC;TO

    it's better to load N go then stay N play

  25. #25
    EastKyFF
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs up

    Clearly EMS personnel can be cut or burned just the same as fire personnel. EMT's & medics from the local private service never wear any PPE that I've seen; doubt they've got it.

    They need it.

    The way we dodge problems here is our fortune in having our own first responders, EMT's & medics (7, 4, and 3, respectively, of our 23 members), plus an excellent relationship w/both EMS providers. This allows OUR people to secure the scene and initiate interior rescuer work prior to EMS arrival (we are five miles or more from both EMS bases). The EMS crews arrive and allow us to keep patient care until the victims are free from the vehicle.

Closed Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 Last

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register