Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
Closed Thread
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    thunter16148
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Ohio law for photographers????

    Hi everyone,We recently had a serious injury accident and it involved minors.During extrication we noticed a woman taking pictures of us working to free the one victim.We have no clue as to who she is or (exactly) what she was photographing.Our local newspaper took a picture a couple months ago very similar to our situation and published a picture in the paper later that same day.They showed the victim and the crew working to free her.The woman died the next day.I feel these kind of photos should not be aloud to be taken or at least published until the victim has recovered and gives consent.Are there any laws in OHIO that regulates how close someone is allowed to take photos or what they can shoot? Can they do so without talking to the people in charge of the scene first?

    Mike

    visit our website at www.geocities.com/oakwood_vfd

    [This message has been edited by thunter16148 (edited 05-19-2001).]


  2. #2
    Steamer
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    As long as it's news reporters/photographers and not just nosey people, there's not much you can do. There's an old adage in the news service that "if it bleeds, it leads." Unfortunately, society itself has created a sort of blood lust for these types of photos. And the freedom of the press to be insensitive and just stupid in some cases is guaranteed in the Constitution.

    Believe me, I get just as frustrated as you with this type of grandstanding by the press, but without some personal, or at least professional integrity on the part of the reporters and/or editors this isn't going to get any better.

    I don't know how many times over the years that they have shown on TV an automobile all torn up with the license plate clearly visible, and bodies just as obvious. Yet they are "sensitive" enough to say the driver's and passenger's names are being withheld until the families are notofied. I know that I could clearly recognize my kid's or wife's auto and license plate. How many other times has that happened to people that have had loved ones in an accident?

    That's a hell of a way to find out out someone in your family has been seriously injured or killed.

    ------------------
    Steve Gallagher
    Chillicothe (Ohio) Fire Department

  3. #3
    daysleeper47
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Just last night a friend of mine from high school was killed by a drunk driver. The next morning, it was all over the news. I was just grateful that someone told me and it had time to sink in before I saw it platered across my TV. No one should find something out that way.

  4. #4
    Big T
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Hey Oakwood
    Just thought I would drop you a line.. Small world I live right down the road CONTINENTAL,, Done mutual aid with you guys many times... You do have a point.. I hate when we are at a scene and some one is taking pictures. I think if you want to take pictures do it after the PT leaves the scene. I'm sure at that point in there life they DO NOT WANT there picture taken. News media or not.. Respect the patient a little.........

    Hug your kids at home and belt them in the car !!!!!!!!!!


  5. #5
    Kangakiwi
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    What you say is correct.I am a very active fire service photographer in my city.Taking pics of the patient is of no benifit to anyone but taking shots of the overall scene is of a benifit to the rescuerers.Many times i have put images on to a disc for viewing by the crews.I have had a large number of images printed over the years but none have been sent without checking with the crews involved.Unfortunately main stream media are not that considerate and use the excuse that it is a public road so it is a public photo.
    On one occasion I was asked by the ambulance service to shoot a rather graphic but difficult extracation ,I did so and gave the undeveloped film to the paramedic commander to do with what he wanted and I never saw the pics.
    Just recently there was a rather brutal murder in my city and the TV channels and one newspaper ran rather disturbing images of the victims wife arriving at the scene well the talk back radio was full of calls condemning the media for the insensitivity shown the the woman maybe that was a wake up call for them.One TV station actually chose not to run that scene to their credit.

  6. #6
    nsfirechap
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    My "full time" job is at a tv station. Often I do video shoots of fire related stuff(for obvious reasons). While we do not need a person's consent for "news" material, I use tact and good judgement and will never show a patient's face, vehicle license plate, or anything else that can identify a patient. It's all about respecting a person's right to privacy s far as I'm concerned. Unfortunately not all reporters do that.
    My peeve is those reporters that get in our way on scene(a quick chat from the Trooopers usually takes care of that), and those reporters that just don't understand that at the time we are just to busy to talk with them and they will have to wait.

  7. #7
    crazyfirechick
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Originally posted by thunter16148:
    Hi everyone,We recently had a serious injury accident and it involved minors.During extrication we noticed a woman taking pictures of us working to free the one victim.We have no clue as to who she is or (exactly) what she was photographing.Our local newspaper took a picture a couple months ago very similar to our situation and published a picture in the paper later that same day.They showed the victim and the crew working to free her.The woman died the next day.I feel these kind of photos should not be aloud to be taken or at least published until the victim has recovered and gives consent.Are there any laws in OHIO that regulates how close someone is allowed to take photos or what they can shoot? Can they do so without talking to the people in charge of the scene first?

    Mike

    visit our website at www.geocities.com/oakwood_vfd

    [This message has been edited by thunter16148 (edited 05-19-2001).]
    The whole point of freedom of expression is to give people such as artists, writers, and PHOTOGRAPHERS the right to express themselves anyway they choose. If that way is to take a close-up of a bloody car accident with the victim in the shot, than so be it. As a photographer myself, not that I personally would create such images, it scares me to think that there could be any kind of censorship. Once censorship starts, it is very hard to stop. Although the newspaper, out of respect for the victim, the newspaper should hold off on publishing the photos until there has been enough time to notify the friends and family.

  8. #8
    kg6303
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation

    No, thats not the point. You need to remember that that victims is someones loved one, its okay if you take a picture of the overall scene, but its not okay if your pictures consist of the patients face or their drivers license. How would you feel if someone took a picture of, say, your wife who just died in an accident and the photographer on scene took pictures of her face or close ups of the body and plastered them on the news or paper? It's not about censorship its about feelings and respect.

    And just for the sake of telling it, I am a photographer and I am on the Daggett volunteer fire dept. I make sure never to take pictures that can make someone emotionally distraught.

  9. #9
    daysleeper47
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Since we are on the topic, I was on a FD website, and they showed some pretty bad MVa pics, and one had an arm of a DOA hanging out the window of an overturned car? What do you think of that? You couldnt recognize the person, as it only showed the arm, but the caption and photo were somewhat shocking, and I was quite taken aback.
    http://i.ezot.com/i/u/53731/i/EXTRICATION25.jpg

    thats the link, the caption was: SQUAD 2 ON A FATAL PIN-IN. NOTICE THE ARM HANGING OUT OF THE WINDOW.

    Am I over reacting? Or does that disturb anyone else. This website is representing the towns FD, or at least one if its company's and any citizen that sees that might be disturbed. What are your thoughts? I can handle the scene, but I think putting it on the website was a bit much.


    ------------------
    Joe
    Daysleeper47
    "When the bell goes ding-ding, its time to get on the woo-woo."
    "Dusting desire - starting to learn. Walking through fire with out a burn..."
    Youngstown Fire Department

  10. #10
    thunter16148
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I agree with you Joe.I viewed the link and think that photo should not appeared as it had.The caption should had never referred to the arm of the deceased.I have taken a great deal of photos and whenever possible I avoid getting the victim in the shot.I absolutely do not post them on our website.It is sad to say that people do not have respect.

    Crazyfirechick.............you are way off the point.There is no reason for a so called (professional) photographer to do what...EXPRESS THEMSELVES????? using someone elses serious injuries or loss of a family member or even friend.

    Thank you for your posts

  11. #11
    Steamer
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Angry

    Beyond photos, the TV news has started playing the 911 calls on serious incidents. Just last night, a Columbus TV station played the 911 tapes of the caller screaming for help. It regressed to her screaming for someone to stop. As I understand the story, she was found dead from stab wounds when the police arrived just minutes later.
    I'm sure that this person's family and freinds thouroughly enjoy hearing their loved one screaming for her life. What a way to remember someone's last few minutes of life. I don't care if family have been notified or not. Nobody has an inherent right to hear or play these tapes. Absolutely no integrity on the part of the station personnel responsible for this decision.
    Is this someone's right of personal expression? Pardon me, but BS!!

    ------------------
    Steve Gallagher
    Chillicothe (Ohio) Fire Department

  12. #12
    TruroFAO
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Our department took the run that Steamer speaks of...One guy literally had his head chopped off, the ladyhad a dozen stab wounds...Never seen a more gruesome scene in my life...The police department here took the initial 911 call...WSYX used VERY poor judgement playing the call...The other two big stations in the city decided not to play it...What public good is served by listening to someone killed? Off topic, I know, but their action really ****ed me off...Good call, Steamer...

  13. #13
    Fire29_1999
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I don't see the need for the person to be seen in the picture, I am both lucky and unlucky that I live where I do in that we have a daily paper in the bigger town 20 miles away and a weekly paper in our town if it happens on a wednesday it will get seen sooner but if it happens on a friday it may get thrown out by the next wednesday depending on how quite it is.

    ------------------
    Stay safe

  14. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1

    Default

    This is a subject close to my heart, both as a survivor of a disaster who lost a loved one in a flood, and as a writer and documentary filmmaker living in a world that has turned all aspects of our life experience into "entertainment". One must set personal standards as an artist, writer, photographer, editor...

    Increasingly, the LAW is on the side of victims whose images are used without authorization. The law is also supporting public safety agencies that set standards on scene and have PIOs or others present to maintain them. Rescuers shouldn't have to police a scene and rescue victims.

    I wrote an article for "9-1-1 Magazine" about the legal trends in "Rescuetainment." Slim Ray has a copy of the piece on his excellent web site (with permission, of course).

    See "Articles by Nancy Rigg"
    "Rescuetainment" http://www.cfspress.com/introarticles.htm

    More city and state governments need to enact laws that, regardless of the legal challenges, protect the privacy of victims and their families at the most intense and deeply personal moments of their lives. This includes photos & video shot on scene, as well as replaying 9-1-1 calls.

    Hope my article helps offer some "solutions" to this growing problem. You are not without the power to do something.

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber E229Lt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    2,987

    Default

    Your department should setup firelines and keep ALL unauthorized people out. DONE

  16. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Oakwood,Ohio USA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Nancy,That was a very informative article.Anyone with any doubts about taking pictures or video footage should read that article.
    Thank you for your reply.
    Mike
    www.geocities.com/oakwood_vfd

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts