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  1. #1
    JR95
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Hitting the Hydrant

    What are your departments standards for "hitting the hydrant?" How are your hose beds packed? Foward or reverse lay and which do your perform todo?


  2. #2
    Nozzleman 84
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    In my fire department we primarily use forward lays but in some situations it's practical to use a split lay. We have dry-barrel hydrants so the hydrantman hooks up a stortz for the 5inch and a gate valve for the 2 1/2. Our hose lays are as follows: the LDH is just a flat load with a dutchman at the end, the rear pre-connect 2 1/2 is a minuteman lay, one of 1 3/4 the cross lays is a triple load, one is a minute man and the third is a flat load, we also use a bumper line off the front.

    ------------------
    Real Heros Wear SCBAs Not Capes

  3. #3
    NJOUTLAW6
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    Well our hydrants all Explorers know that LEFTY-LOOSIE RIGHTY-TIGHTY... WE lay Hose to either an Engine or to the Portable Hydrant in the middle of the street for attack lines to run off.

    ------------------
    Thomas
    Protection Eng Co Explorer Post #6http://explorer506.boltpages.com/tomswebsite506/id2.html

  4. #4
    JR95
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    I figure since this is my topic, I should let you know what we do.

    Our hose beds are setup for forward lays, and we have two types of supply lines. A 3" and 2.5". Typically, the hydrant man, grabs both lines and wraps them around the hydrant while the engine continues to the scene. The 3" line gets attached to the coupling on the hydrant that is closest to the scene, while the 2.5" line gets attached to a steamer adapter, on the coupling that is facing the scene.

  5. #5
    Jr_ AssistChief
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    Both of my companies use forward lays but everything else is different. With one station, we use a pre-connected Humat valve that I wrap around the hydrant before they take off and lay in. I can then directly attach the Humat valve to the hydrant, although sometimes we need the adapter which is on the opposite end of the truck along with the mallet. Quite a hassle. With the other company, each truck has a hydrand bag next to the hose roll(instead of a bed). I wrap the hose around the hydrant, and as they lay in I connect hydrant valves to each side and use an adapter to connect the 5' to the main line. I pretty much go over what I need to do every time I am on the truck on the way to the scene so I am ready to hit it.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Cranford, NJ
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Our Policy is that an explorer should be the "Hydrant Man" because we are under-manned. First we grab the hydrant bag and the 5 inch feeder. We wrap the feeder around the hydrant and tell the supply engine to take off. Now we fit any cuplings (cause we have standard and New Yorker Hydrants) and than on the 3 inch steamer closest tot the scene we put a gated 3 inch cupling (incase the 5 inch feeder blows) and then we attach the 5 inch feeder. Put the wrench on top and wait for either a hand sidnal or the air horn (if they're out of sight)

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Egremont, Massachusettes
    Posts
    129

    Default

    JR95. One question. DO you have any large diameter supply line 4 or 5"? Seems kinda silly to be running 2.5 or 3 for supply. Not trying to diss your dept or anything..just wondering.
    HELL YEAH!!!
    The comments made by me are just that. Not of the Fire dept or Ambulance squad I am on.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Orcutt CA
    Posts
    28

    Default

    we have 2 differnt types of supply lines on our structure engine we have 850' 4" hose and 1000' 2.5" hose we have mostly wet barrel hydernts so we connect up the 2.5" and if we need the 4" we hand jack it to the hydrent and does anyone use reverse lays for hydrents? cause i dont know anyone on our type 2 and type 3 we just have 1000' of 2.5" hose no ldh
    -Tristin
    Orcutt Fire Protection District
    Explorer Post 2335
    Always remember "when the **** hits the fan turn off the fan"

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    LINCOLN, R.I.
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Our second due engine lays two 3 in. one of which has a double gate on it incase another truck comes in later. Wwe keep everything we need on the back of the truck, and the hose beds are more than adequately stocked. The hydrants in town genrally run very high pressures and have 2, 3 in ports and the 6 inch steamer port that we almost never use except in rare instances, usually if another engine tags another nearby hydrant to feed a different set of master streams.

    By the way the reason for the 2, 3's is because the trucks can run over them while the line is charged. Other departments in town use 5" and its a hassle on a crowded fire scene.

    [ 07-29-2001: Message edited by: JEFFREY ALMOND ]

    [ 08-27-2001: Message edited by: JEFFREY ALMOND ]

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Warrington Pa
    Posts
    124

    Default

    In our department juniors are usually hydrant man. We just take the humat valve and hook up to the hydrant. We have 5 inch hose on the humat.

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    10

    Default

    We have 3 engines none of which are equiped with LDH. Each engine has a bed of 2.5" and a bed of 3" Which do you think is easier to pack? I am not sure the "official" reason why our department uses 2.5/3" and not LDH

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Jefferson County, Kentucky (Louisville)
    Posts
    30

    Default

    We run with a minimum load of 800 foot of 5" LDH supply line on a flat load alternating short/long. Our first 50' section has a 10'trpile stack with a hydrant bag looped thre with rope folding over the hydrant connection. Policy states hydrant man pulls the rope attached to the hose and bag and grabs gate valve. Pulls to the Engineers side if possible if not goes to hydrant and waves company on. Connection on our hydrants is simple connect gate valve away from scene and supply to the fire side. Our hydrants our dry barrels Dual 4" openings National Standard Thread (CITY HYDRANT) or Dual 2 1/2" National Standard thread with a 4" opening in center. We carry a minimum of 800 foot of 2 1/2" on all companies to use as a last resort. We are primaraly an industrial area so we require the large flow.
    "A 4x4 **** son plywood comes in bigger sheets than that make that hole bigger boy" There are those out there that know what I mean!!!!!!

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    450

    Default

    In my dept. they tend to be pretty lenient, um we can ride all equipment, run raidos and such like that. Um normally the newer juniors will ride with the engine so they can just hook up to the hydrant, we use a steamer. But anyways, I myself ride the heavy rescue. We cannot run the jaws, drive equipment, climb a ladder at scene, or man a hose by ourself. I normally am working at the rescue however running the CASCADE system and just maitain the air bottles really.
    Firefighter/EMT Mitch Cowen
    Hose Co. 1 1st Lieutenant
    Randolph Fire Co. Inc

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