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  1. #1
    HFD_CLanger
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post Large loads of LDH: Reels vs. Beds

    *I posted these two topics in the
    "Apparatus Innovation" section, and thought that I might also want to present the questions in this forum.*

    My department protects an area of 40 square miles with no hydrants. We rely on long lays of 4" LDH with no structure more than 3000' feet from a water hole and dry hydrant. We currently utilize a 1987 KME with 2700' of 4" on a hydraulic reel and 700' more in the bed to meet this need. Typically the reel truck (also equipped with a 1,250gpm pump and 1000 gallons of water) will lay a line from the fire (and the attack truck) to the water hole and set in while another 1000gpm pumper sets up a relay valve halfway through the lay.

    I am wondering what other departments use for similar situations and what your experience has been with LDH reels vs. large hose beds (one obvious advantage of the bed being the ability to lay dual lines).

    Any discussion regarding large loads of LDH and/or relays/long lays would be appreciated.



  2. #2
    Neptune 33
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I'm just curious as to how long it takes to lay your line from the reel. The town next to mine has a reel truck, and the top speed is 5-10 mph, and it takes almost 15 mintues to lay the entire load (3500' 5") So, I'm an advocate of the flat lay in the bed, for speed and time.

  3. #3
    LHS*
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We can drop 2000 feet of 5 inch have it charged and flowing in less than 3.5 minutes with one firefighter. A 4000 foot lay flowing using a two engine relay takes just 5.5 minutes whether at draft or off a hydrant. We commonly lay home at 35 mph plus.

  4. #4
    sloepoke1
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I have not used a reel truck but when inside the area that has hydrants we have 1500' laid in the hose bed. When outside hydrant area we use a tanker shuttle system that requires the use of mutual aid from the four surrounding depts. and with an average of 1800 gals per tanker we usually have more than enough water to do the job. Then there is the rare occasion that we can draft out of a pond with portable pumps, or mini pumpers if we can get them close enough.


  5. #5
    engine198
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Originally posted by LHS*:
    We can drop 2000 feet of 5 inch have it charged and flowing in less than 3.5 minutes with one firefighter. A 4000 foot lay flowing using a two engine relay takes just 5.5 minutes whether at draft or off a hydrant. We commonly lay home at 35 mph plus.
    jeez. that seems like a little fast. doesnt it damage your couplings. I would think a coupling flying off the bed of a truck at 35 mph wouldnt last too long. Plus what if i a coupling gets hung up in the bed. No matter how good you stack it, it alsways figures out a way to get caught up.

    Dont get me wrong. I am all for hose beds over reels, but please do it with a little safety in mind.

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